The 29th Uncut new music playlist of 2018

A soundtrack to the Indian Summer

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A lot of more ambient, experimental sounds at the start of this week’s playlist – I should really thank Richard Williams for recommending Arve Henriksen’s The Height Of The Reeds the other day, which started me off down this route. What else? A new venture from Steve Jansen, the return of Thom Yorke, some vintage cuts from Zimbabwe’s mbira queen, Stella Chiweshe. Now dive in.

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1.
ARVE HENRIKSEN

“Pink Cherry Trees”
(Rune Grammofon)

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2.
EXIT NORTH

“Bested Bones”
(via Bandcamp)

Book of Romance and Dust by Exit North

3.
FEDERICO DURAND

“Los Juguetes De Minka Podhajska”
(Iikki)

4.
THOM YORKE

“Suspirium”
(XL Recordings)

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5.
DISCLOSURE

“Moonlight” [Extended Mix]
(UMG)

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6.
HAIKU SALUT

“The More And Moreness”
(PRAH Recordings)

7.
STELLA CHIWESHE

“Mayaya (Part 1 & 2)”
(Glitterbeat Records)

8.
CAMERA

“Emotional Detox” [Snippets]
(Bureau B)

9.
TUNNG

“ABOP”
(Full Time Hobby)

10.
BLUE ORCHIDS

“Get Bramah”
(Tiny Global Productions)

11.
MICAH P. HINSON

“Small Spaces”
(Full Time Hobby)

12.
DUR DUR BAND

“Jaceyl Mirahiis”
(Analog Africa)

The October 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jimi Hendrix on the cover. Elsewhere in the issue, you’ll find exclusive features on Spiritualized, Aretha Franklin, Richard Thompson, Soft Cell, Pink Floyd, Candi Staton, Garcia Peoples, Beach Boys, Mudhoney, Big Red Machine and many more. Our free CD showcases 15 tracks of this month’s best new music, including Beak>, Low, Christine And The Queens, Marissa Nadler and Eric Bachman.

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