Killing Joke – For Beginners

Jaz Coleman's (not so) merry men short-changed by another piecemeal compilation

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Their peers PiL may remain fashionable, but although Killing Joke’s influence surfaces still in bands like Metallica and The Foo Fighters, it seems their reappraisal has been lost in the post. Sadly, this album won’t help. A primer rather than a best-of, it’s frustratingly patchy. Debut single “The Wait” and a taster of the Conny Plank-produced Revelations are sensible choices, but rather than the storming “Kings & Queens” or “Eighties” from Night Time, there’s “Tabazan”, and Coleman’s woeful solo effort from ’88 is given an airing, instead of his band’s extraordinarily powerful LP of last year. Not for beginners.

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