Kenny Wheeler – Song For Someone

Evan Parker ought to be knighted for re-mastering and reissuing this, one of the great British orchestral jazz records. Utilising stalwart British jazzers alongside wildcard improvisers like saxophonist Parker, guitarist Derek Bailey and percussionist Tony Oxley, Wheeler brilliantly fuses gorgeously limpid melodies ("Ballad Two") with free-form interludes. Great cliffs of brass echo Gil Evans, but note the subtle nod to electric Miles (those two electric pianos) and the inspired use of Norma Winstone's voice as an instrument.

Trending Now

Introducing the new Uncut… Bob Dylan at 80 and our free 15-track Dylan CD!

Welcome to a very special issue of Uncut, as we celebrate Bob Dylan’s 80th birthday. As you might imagine,...

Introducing Uncut’s amazing Bob Dylan covers CD

Featuring 14 brand new versions of Dylan songs by The Flaming Lips, Cowboy Junkies, The Weather Station and more - plus one previously unreleased Dylan track

Introducing the Deluxe Ultimate Music Guide to Neil Young

Updated with a deep dive into Archives II and more

Prince’s “lost” album Welcome 2 America is finally getting released

The Prince Estate have announced details of a new release. Dating from 2010, Welcome 2 America is finally due for...

George Martin’s ‘Ray Cathode’ tracks to be reissued

Two electronic instrumental tracks from George Martin dating from the early Sixties are being reissued. A collaboration with BBC Radiophonic...

Evan Parker ought to be knighted for re-mastering and reissuing this, one of the great British orchestral jazz records. Utilising stalwart British jazzers alongside wildcard improvisers like saxophonist Parker, guitarist Derek Bailey and percussionist Tony Oxley, Wheeler brilliantly fuses gorgeously limpid melodies (“Ballad Two”) with free-form interludes. Great cliffs of brass echo Gil Evans, but note the subtle nod to electric Miles (those two electric pianos) and the inspired use of Norma Winstone’s voice as an instrument. The highlight is the 15-minute “The Good Doctor”, its wan lyricism simultaneously underlined and derailed by the explosive and still shocking climactic freak-out from Parker, Bailey and Oxley. Forget Matthew Herbert’s big band; this still sounds like the future.

Advertisement

Latest Issue

Advertisement

Features

Advertisement