God Save Our Mad Parade

The sex pistols have become as much of a great British institution as the ones they so chaotically threatened more than a quarter of a century ago. Retelling their stories individually, Lydon, Matlock, Jones and Cook today look and sound as harmless as the good old guy down the pub, although Lydon still employs the glittering Stare to dramatic effect.

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The sex pistols have become as much of a great British institution as the ones they so chaotically threatened more than a quarter of a century ago. Retelling their stories individually, Lydon, Matlock, Jones and Cook today look and sound as harmless as the good old guy down the pub, although Lydon still employs the glittering Stare to dramatic effect. Malcolm McLaren and Jamie Reed join journalists, record company executives and production and studio staff as the history of the Pistols, and the making of their one great album, is related in detail, with live clips accompanied by footage of such splendid outrages as the Bill Grundy show and the Jubilee boat trip. Jones’ real musical strengths in the band are revealed for the first time, and, in another surprising twist, Lydon, Jones and Cook express regrets over their treatment of Matlock.

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