Ginger Baker’s Air Force

As with most supergroups, Air Force roared in tight and punchy and staggered out again sprawling and paunchy—and not a little junk sick. When it blows its stacks, this album is very, very good. Harold McNair and Chris Wood are on blistering form on flutes and saxes, and the presence of Graham Bond brings more than a little holy magick to the table, particularly on "Early In The Morning" and "Aiko Biaye".

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As with most supergroups, Air Force roared in tight and punchy and staggered out again sprawling and paunchy?and not a little junk sick. When it blows its stacks, this album is very, very good. Harold McNair and Chris Wood are on blistering form on flutes and saxes, and the presence of Graham Bond brings more than a little holy magick to the table, particularly on “Early In The Morning” and “Aiko Biaye”. “Toad” completists will undoubtedly be thrilled by another version of that solo, but by the end they’ve just about exhausted the dynamics of the reprised theme, and that second drum solo on “Do What You Like” is definitely one too many.

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