Dire Straights

Who'd have thought after the debacle of Velvet Goldmine that Todd Haynes' next film would be as clever, meaningful and powerfully resonant as this masterpiece of stylised social commentary? In the 1950s, the expatriate German director Douglas Sirk directed a series of Hollywood films that at the time were sniffily known as "women's pictures", which only later were recognised as brilliantly crafted satires, as sharply observed as novels like Revolutionary Road, Richard Yates' classic dissection of the Eisenhower years.

Trending Now

Who’d have thought after the debacle of Velvet Goldmine that Todd Haynes’ next film would be as clever, meaningful and powerfully resonant as this masterpiece of stylised social commentary?

In the 1950s, the expatriate German director Douglas Sirk directed a series of Hollywood films that at the time were sniffily known as “women’s pictures”, which only later were recognised as brilliantly crafted satires, as sharply observed as novels like Revolutionary Road, Richard Yates’ classic dissection of the Eisenhower years. Haynes here appropriates Sirk’s uniquely melodramatic template?the heightened emotions, the ravishing colour schemes, soaring music?and subverts the form further than Sirk would’ve dared. The result is a riveting expos

Advertisement

Latest Issue

Advertisement

Features

The Waterboys on Room To Roam’s legacy: “We were a lot wilder and more exciting than the record conveyed”

Riding high on the momentum of Fisherman’s Blues, in 1989 The Waterboys reconvened at their new spiritual home in Ireland to make the follow-up. Mike Scott’s plan to broaden the sound didn’t quite go to plan, but as a new box-set reveals, Room To Roam was far from a misfire
Advertisement