Manic Street Preachers debut new song “Let’s Go To War” at Brixton gig – watch

Manic Street Preachers played new song "Let's Go To War" for the first time as they ended their UK tour in London last night (April 11). The band offered up a taste of new album Futurology during their headline performance at O2 Academy Brixton with Nicky Wire introducing the track by saying: "Please excuse me if I fuck it up. This is a nice marching song, it's called 'Let's Go To War'."

Trending Now

Pete Townshend looks back at The Who in 1967: “I don’t think I was angry”

Smashing guitars, hanging out with Small Faces and keeping Keith Moon onside

Mogwai: Album By Album

Founded in 1995 and initially a trio, Glasgow’s Mogwai made their debut with “Tuner/Lower”, a self-pressed seven-inch in thrall...

Introducing the new issue of Uncut

GETTING YOUR COPY OF THIS MONTH'S UNCUT DELIVERED STRAIGHT TO YOUR DOOR IS EASY AND HASSLE FREE - CLICK...

Introducing the Deluxe Ultimate Music Guide to Bob Marley

In-depths reviews and archive encounters with the reggae legend

Manic Street Preachers played new song “Let’s Go To War” for the first time as they ended their UK tour in London last night (April 11).

The band offered up a taste of new album Futurology during their headline performance at O2 Academy Brixton with Nicky Wire introducing the track by saying: “Please excuse me if I fuck it up. This is a nice marching song, it’s called ‘Let’s Go To War’.”

The London show marked the final night of a tour which began in Leeds late last month. That show in Yorkshire also saw new tracks played with “Europa Geht Durch Mich” and “Futurology” featuring on the setlist.

Tweeting after the gig, a message from bass player Nicky Wire read: “As I sit here in a comforting yet painful ice bath I can only thank everyone who came to brixton tonight-TRULY STUNNING CROWD.”

Futurology will be the follow-up to 2013’s Rewind The Film.

Speaking previously about Futurology to NME, James Dean Bradfield said: “It’s a lot spikier and shinier. It’s much more band-based, a tiny bit of krautrock influence. It’s not like The Holy Bible but there’s a bit of the same intent and threat. Lyrically, it’s got a European fascination. The landscape of Europe, the malaise of Europe, the malaise of us Brits not feeling part of it.”





Advertisement

Latest Issue

The Who, New York Dolls, Fugazi, Peggy Seeger, Scritti Politti, Bob Dylan, Marvin Gaye, Serge Gainsbourg, Israel Nash and Valerie June
Advertisement

Features

Advertisement