The Mendoza Line – Fortune

If 2002's wonderful Lost In Revelry was Blonde On Blonde rescrambled by Westerberg and barbed by Costello, the more buoyant Fortune thrashes to the classic American assembly-line rock of Springsteen and the choppy pop of early Nick Lowe/Joe Jackson.

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If 2002’s wonderful Lost In Revelry was Blonde On Blonde rescrambled by Westerberg and barbed by Costello, the more buoyant Fortune thrashes to the classic American assembly-line rock of Springsteen and the choppy pop of early Nick Lowe/Joe Jackson. Shannon Mary McArdle’s Runaways-like “Faithful Brother (Scourge Of The Land)” is typical of the broader, chrome’n’ketchup approach, but?as on the Brooklyn sextet’s previous outings?the finest moments are found in the shadows: the piano smoke of Timothy Bracy and Peter Hofmann’s “Metro Pictures”, the delicately frosted “Will You Be Here Tomorrow?”, and McArdle’s countrified slow waltz “They Never Bat An Eye”.

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