Robert Johnson – The Old School Blues

Look closely at the cover of Dylan's Bringing It All Back Home, and you'll see a copy of Robert Johnson's King Of The Delta Blues Singers. Released in 1961 but recorded a quarter of a century earlier, the Stones, Cream and Led Zeppelin all plundered it for source material, making it arguably the single most influential album on '60s rock. All 29 sides recorded by Johnson in his short lifetime are included here, and if you don't already own them, now's your chance. That they come with a second disc rounding up 25 of Johnson's contemporaries from Bessie Smith to Son House is a bonus.

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Look closely at the cover of Dylan’s Bringing It All Back Home, and you’ll see a copy of Robert Johnson’s King Of The Delta Blues Singers. Released in 1961 but recorded a quarter of a century earlier, the Stones, Cream and Led Zeppelin all plundered it for source material, making it arguably the single most influential album on ’60s rock. All 29 sides recorded by Johnson in his short lifetime are included here, and if you don’t already own them, now’s your chance. That they come with a second disc rounding up 25 of Johnson’s contemporaries from Bessie Smith to Son House is a bonus.

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The Who, New York Dolls, Fugazi, Peggy Seeger, Scritti Politti, Bob Dylan, Marvin Gaye, Serge Gainsbourg, Israel Nash and Valerie June
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