The National ‘wouldn’t have existed without REM’

The National’s Bryce Dessner has revealed that the band wouldn’t have formed without REM.

Trending Now

Fugazi’s Ian MacKaye: “We decided we were going to start a new scene”

The new issue of Uncut revisits the birth of post-hardcore in Washington DC

Mogwai: Album By Album

Founded in 1995 and initially a trio, Glasgow’s Mogwai made their debut with “Tuner/Lower”, a self-pressed seven-inch in thrall...

Pete Townshend looks back at The Who in 1967: “I don’t think I was angry”

Smashing guitars, hanging out with Small Faces and keeping Keith Moon onside

Introducing the Deluxe Ultimate Music Guide to Bob Marley

In-depths reviews and archive encounters with the reggae legend

The National’s Bryce Dessner has revealed that the band wouldn’t have formed without REM.

In the new issue of Uncut, in stores on January 31, the guitarist explains that the legacy of the Athens, Georgia band, especially the influence of singer Michael Stipe, has allowed groups like his to flourish.

“For American musicians especially,” he says, ”they opened up a door in terms of what they symbolised.

“They provided an alternative to the mainstream, especially Michael as a frontman. The National wouldn’t have existed if REM hadn’t.”

Dessner goes on to reveal that his most treasured REM album is 1986’s ‘Lifes Rich Pageant’.

For more of Bryce Dessner on the most important albums of his life, check out the new March issue of Uncut, out January 31.

Advertisement

Latest Issue

The Who, New York Dolls, Fugazi, Peggy Seeger, Scritti Politti, Bob Dylan, Marvin Gaye, Serge Gainsbourg, Israel Nash and Valerie June
Advertisement

Features

Advertisement