The Marbles

Best known for their late-'60s hit "Only One Woman" and its identically arranged follow-up "The Walls Fall Down", the Marbles were driven by the sheet metal-bending larynx of Graham Bonnet and the prolific writing of the Gibb brothers, who are responsible for half of the tracks featured here.

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Best known for their late-’60s hit “Only One Woman” and its identically arranged follow-up “The Walls Fall Down”, the Marbles were driven by the sheet metal-bending larynx of Graham Bonnet and the prolific writing of the Gibb brothers, who are responsible for half of the tracks featured here. Bonnet, who a decade later would front Ritchie Blackmore’s Rainbow, leads a convincingly impassioned charge through “I Can’t See Nobody” and “Stay With Me Baby” but fares less well with “A House Is Not A Home” and a somewhat overwrought “To Love Somebody”. Although Bonnet’s occasionally graceless histrionics get a little too much over the spread of a whole album, pastoral relief is provided by his partner Trevor Gordon, whose two self-penned contributions, “Daytime” and “Elizabeth Johnson”, provide a welcomingly delicate counterpoint.

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