Pink Floyd sue EMI over royalty dispute

Case relates to contracts signed in 1998 and 1999

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Pink Floyd‘s former members are suing their record label EMI over a dispute regarding royalty payments for tracks sold online.

The band’s lawyer Rupert Howe took their case – which was originally filed last April – to a court hearing in London yesterday (March 9), and said that his clients wanted clarification on a contract with EMI that they negotiated in 1998 and 1999.

The contract is said to state that Pink Floyd albums should be sold as one and not separated into individual songs, reports Businessweek.com. Since the signing of contract, Pink Floyd songs were made available from download clients including iTunes.

Howe said of the contract, “It was unclear whether record companies would be selling direct to the consumer or through retailers.”

He added, “It’s a matter of fact that the defendant has been permitting individual tracks to be downloaded online and that therefore they have been allowing albums not to be sold in their original configuration.”

EMI lawyer Elizabeth Jones said that the contract did not cover online sales of the band’s music.

The case continues.

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