Friday: The Afternoon Shift – Chairlift, 1990s and Amazing Baby

Hello campers - since touching down a couple of hours ago, I've made it my mission to dash around the Latitude site catching as many bands as possible, giving my boots their first coat of brown since Green Man '07 in the process. Hopefully they won't see quite as much muddy action this time around.

Trending Now

Fugazi’s Ian MacKaye: “We decided we were going to start a new scene”

The new issue of Uncut revisits the birth of post-hardcore in Washington DC

Mogwai: Album By Album

Founded in 1995 and initially a trio, Glasgow’s Mogwai made their debut with “Tuner/Lower”, a self-pressed seven-inch in thrall...

Pete Townshend looks back at The Who in 1967: “I don’t think I was angry”

Smashing guitars, hanging out with Small Faces and keeping Keith Moon onside

Introducing the Deluxe Ultimate Music Guide to Bob Marley

In-depths reviews and archive encounters with the reggae legend

Hello campers – since touching down a couple of hours ago, I’ve made it my mission to dash around the Latitude site catching as many bands as possible, giving my boots their first coat of brown since Green Man ’07 in the process. Hopefully they won’t see quite as much muddy action this time around.



First up, to the Uncut Arena for Chairlift, three young New Yorkers currently perhaps best known for giving a song, “Bruises”, to an iPod advert. It’s exposure they deserve, though, as this set of gently psychedelic synth-pop is both beautifully made and packed with tunes that quietly weevil their way into your consciousness. Co-frontpeople Aaron Pfenning, deadpan behind terribly cool shades, and Caroline Polachek trade vocals, while drummer Patrick Wimberly darts between kit and billowing electronics. A neat reminder that if you look beyond the current media scrum around Little Boots, La Roux et al, there’s outfits doing electronic pop with more subtlety and more success – well, artistic success, anyroad.

Then, over to the Sunset Arena to catch the end of Scottish indie-rock royalty the 1990s. Who are very good, at least what I see, but it’s worth mentioning the Sunset Arena as an example of Latitude’s main selling points. A little tent buried deep in the woods, it’s the sort of beautiful little space you don’t so much walk up to as ramble into, surrounded by ferns and set under towering oaks.

Leaving, I run into sometime Uncut snapper Neil Thompson, who is heading in to catch the hotly tipped Goldheart Assembly. But I’m back down the hill to catch Brooklyn’s Amazing Baby on the Obelisk Stage (that’s the main stage, to you and me). Heard varying reports on this lot, but in the beating sun their longhaired lite-psychedelia – think MGMT, or a Mercury Rev on designer drugs – is not without its charms.

More in a bit, but right now I can hear Of Montreal playing in the distance, and if they have an actual live horse on stage – it wouldn’t be the first time – well, I’m not about to miss it.

LOUIS PATTISON

Advertisement

Latest Issue

The Who, New York Dolls, Fugazi, Peggy Seeger, Scritti Politti, Bob Dylan, Marvin Gaye, Serge Gainsbourg, Israel Nash and Valerie June
Advertisement

Features

Advertisement