Wild Mercury Sound

The 33rd Uncut Playlist Of 2012

The 33rd Uncut Playlist Of 2012
John Mulvey

Twenty mostly new records for your delectation this week, with particular emphasis on: the Michael Chapman full and free download from Black Dirt Studios’ consistently excellent “Natch” project; Cody ChesnuTT’s plush, upscale return; Corin Tucker tapping back into the punch of earlyish Sleater-Kinney; Jeff Lynne’s weird forensic re-recordings of his greatest hits; that Crazy Horse boot I wrote about yesterday; and Rangda, of course.

Follow me on Twitter: www.twitter.com/JohnRMulvey

1 Michael Chapman & The Woodpiles – Natch 7 (http://natchmusic.tumblr.com/)

2 Neil Young & Crazy Horse – Live at the Red Rocks Amphitheatre, Morrison, CO; August 5, 2012 (Bootleg)

3 Menomena – Moms (Barsuk)

4 The Be Good Tanyas – Collection (Nettwerk)

5 The Pyramids – Otherworldly (Disko B)

6 Cody ChesnuTT – Landing On A Hundred (One Little Indian)

7 Yo La Tengo – Painful (Matador)

8 Jason Lytle – Dept Of Disappearance (Anti-)

9 Rickie Lee Jones – The Devil You Know (Concord)

10 Martha Wainwright – Come Home To Mama (Drowned In Sound/V2)

11 Tim Maia – Nobody Can Live Forever: The Existential Soul Of Tim Maia (Luaka Bop)

12 Mark Eitzel – Don’t Be A Stranger (Décor)

13 David Hidalgo/Mato Nanji/Luther Dickinson – Three Skulls And The Truth (Provogue)

14 Corin Tucker Band – Kill My Blues (Kill Rock Stars)

15 Diana Krall – Glad Rag Doll (Verve)

16 Jeff Lynne/Electric Light Orchestra – Mr. Blue Sky: The Very Best Of ELO (Frontiers)

17 Trin Tran – Dark Radar (God?/Drag City)

18 Hladowski & Joynes – The Wild Wild Berry (Bo’Weavil)

19 The Touré-Raichel Collective – The Tel Aviv Session (Cumbancha)

20 Rangda – Formerly Extinct (Drag City)


Newsletter


Editor's Letter

"Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye": Cosimo Matassa 1926-2014


Among my post last week, I received a nice care package from Ace Records that included one quite weird Duke Ellington album ("My People"); Volume 3 of their "Where Country Meets Soul" series (I cannot recommend Ralph ''Soul'' Jackson's version of ''Jambalaya'' highly enough); and, maybe best of...