Send us your questions for Tom Morello

The RATM and sometime E Street Band guitarist will answer them in a future issue of Uncut

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One of the weirder scenes from the messy aftermath of the US election was the sight of confused Trump supporters in Philadelphia, dancing to Rage Against The Machine’s anti-police-brutality anthem “Killing In The Name”.

On Twitter, RATM shredder-in-chief Tom Morello – who once taped a large ‘Fuck Trump’ sign to the back of his guitar – responded with heroic understatement: “Not exactly what we had in mind”…

“Killing In The Name” was most people’s introduction to Morello’s unique guitar style – a searing combination of funk and hard rock flash, delivered with ferocious intent. It was the stunning opening salvo in a long career of blistering guitar work allied to potent political messaging, although Morello has also long since proved himself to be a versatile musician and sympathetic collaborator.

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As well as the thundering testimonies of Rage Against The Machine, Audioslave and Prophets Of Rage, he’s released four albums of protest folk as The Nightwatchman; and after impressing in several guest appearances with Bruce Springsteen, he was recruited to the E Street Band, touring with them for several years and playing on Wrecking Ball and High Hopes.

Morello’s latest solo EP Comandante returns to a more familiar mode, paying tribute to Eddie Van Halen and Jimi Hendrix and duelling with Slash. But a touching new photo memoir, Whatever It Takes, reveals the full range of his passions.

So what do you want to ask a lifelong guitar rebel? Send your questions to audiencewith@uncut.co.uk by Tuesday (November 17), and Tom will answer the best ones in a future issue of Uncut.

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