Countdown to Latitude: dEUS

I remember seeing dEUS at their UK 'comeback' show at London's ICA around the time of the excellent 'Pocket Revolution' album, the band's four year hiatus having not dented the furious, urgent, wonderfully fuzzy live experience that Belgium's biggest musical export can create. Tom Barman and Klaas Janzoons' group are certainly one of the more exciting 'underground' bands to be playing on Latitude's main stage this year.

Trending Now

dEUS

I remember seeing dEUS at their UK ‘comeback’ show at London’s ICA around the time of the excellent ‘Pocket Revolution’ album, the band’s four year hiatus having not dented the furious, urgent, wonderfully fuzzy live experience that Belgium’s biggest musical export can create. Tom Barman and Klaas Janzoons‘ group are certainly one of the more exciting ‘underground’ bands to be playing on Latitude’s main stage this year.



dEUS have always mixed up folk, rock, metal and jazz in their music, and have counted the likes of R.E.M‘s Michael Stipe, Radiohead and Muse amongst their dedicated, cultish fan following since their ’94 debut ‘Worst Case Scenario’ – which contained their breakthrough single “Suds & Soda.”
Their Obelisk Arena set could feasibly (fingers crossed) feature a live collaboration with Saturday evening bill-sharers Elbow. The Mancunian group’s frontman Guy Garvey guests on “The Vanishing Of Maria Schneider” on the Belgians’ latest, eclectic as always, album ‘Vantage Point’. If Garvey’s not too busy prepping his choir of backing singers, he could well turn up in the wings for dEUS.

If you want to be swept up into a fusion of fuzzy guitars, be sure to check out the Antwerp rockers, currently on a massive world tour, when they stop off at Henham Park on Saturday July 19.

Advertisement

Latest Issue

Bruce Springsteen, Uncut’s Review Of 2021, Jason Isbell, Yasmin Williams, Jonny Greenwood, The Weather Station, Robert Plant & Alison Krauss, the Beach Boys, The Coral, and Marvin Gaye
Advertisement

Features

Yasmin Williams: “I wanted to imagine things getting better”

Released in January, Yasmin Williams’ mesmerising album Urban Driftwood respected the old traditions of folk music but simultaneously made fresh currency out of them. Stephen Deusner meets Williams in Nashville to map the course of her incredible year since – and her plans for 2022. “I’m pretty optimistic about the future,” she says. “At least, way more than I was a year ago…”
Advertisement