Eric Clapton – Martin Scorsese Presents The Blues: Eric Clapton

If Scorsese skimps on the British blues in his box set, he compensates with a single spin-off disc focusing solely on Slowhand's contribution to the devil's music. Ten tracks trace Clapton's development through his days with John Mayall to Cream, Blind Faith and Derek And The Dominos. We also get "Rockin' Today" from the famous 1970 London sessions with Howlin' Wolf. There's nothing of more recent vintage, such as his 2001 collaboration with BB King. But it's still an impressive summary of Clapton's credentials as—surely—the greatest white blues man of them all.

Trending Now

Pete Townshend looks back at The Who in 1967: “I don’t think I was angry”

Smashing guitars, hanging out with Small Faces and keeping Keith Moon onside

Mogwai: Album By Album

Founded in 1995 and initially a trio, Glasgow’s Mogwai made their debut with “Tuner/Lower”, a self-pressed seven-inch in thrall...

Introducing the new issue of Uncut

GETTING YOUR COPY OF THIS MONTH'S UNCUT DELIVERED STRAIGHT TO YOUR DOOR IS EASY AND HASSLE FREE - CLICK...

Introducing the Deluxe Ultimate Music Guide to Bob Marley

In-depths reviews and archive encounters with the reggae legend

If Scorsese skimps on the British blues in his box set, he compensates with a single spin-off disc focusing solely on Slowhand’s contribution to the devil’s music. Ten tracks trace Clapton’s development through his days with John Mayall to Cream, Blind Faith and Derek And The Dominos. We also get “Rockin’ Today” from the famous 1970 London sessions with Howlin’ Wolf. There’s nothing of more recent vintage, such as his 2001 collaboration with BB King. But it’s still an impressive summary of Clapton’s credentials as?surely?the greatest white blues man of them all.

Advertisement

Latest Issue

The Who, New York Dolls, Fugazi, Peggy Seeger, Scritti Politti, Bob Dylan, Marvin Gaye, Serge Gainsbourg, Israel Nash and Valerie June
Advertisement

Features

Advertisement