Eric Clapton – Martin Scorsese Presents The Blues: Eric Clapton

If Scorsese skimps on the British blues in his box set, he compensates with a single spin-off disc focusing solely on Slowhand's contribution to the devil's music. Ten tracks trace Clapton's development through his days with John Mayall to Cream, Blind Faith and Derek And The Dominos. We also get "Rockin' Today" from the famous 1970 London sessions with Howlin' Wolf. There's nothing of more recent vintage, such as his 2001 collaboration with BB King. But it's still an impressive summary of Clapton's credentials as—surely—the greatest white blues man of them all.

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If Scorsese skimps on the British blues in his box set, he compensates with a single spin-off disc focusing solely on Slowhand’s contribution to the devil’s music. Ten tracks trace Clapton’s development through his days with John Mayall to Cream, Blind Faith and Derek And The Dominos. We also get “Rockin’ Today” from the famous 1970 London sessions with Howlin’ Wolf. There’s nothing of more recent vintage, such as his 2001 collaboration with BB King. But it’s still an impressive summary of Clapton’s credentials as?surely?the greatest white blues man of them all.

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