Jonny Greenwood shares unreleased Radiohead song

'Spooks' now features Joanna Newsom and Supergrass's Gaz Coombes and Danny Goffey...

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‘Spooks’ now features Joanna Newsom and Supergrass’s Gaz Coombes and Danny Goffey…

Previously unreleased Radiohead track “Spooks“, which will feature in director Paul Thomas Anderson’s new film Inherent Vice, is now streaming online.

Visit Stereogum to listen to the new version of the song, which features spoken word from musician and one of the film’s stars, Joanna Newsom, as well as instrumentation from former Supergrass members Gaz Coombes and Danny Goffey.

The song was originally unveiled during a live performance by Radiohead eight years ago, in May 2006 in Copenhagen. The new version sees Jonny Greenwood, who has composed the Inherent Vice soundtrack, at the helm. Greenwood’s soundtrack also features Neil Young song “Journey Through The Past”, “Vitamin C” by Can, Minnie Ripperton’s “Les Fleur” and a host of original compositions from Greenwood himself.

Greenwood also provided music for Anderson’s last two films, There Will Be Blood and The Master. His Inherent Vice score features London’s Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. The film stars Joaquin Phoenix, Josh Brolin, Owen Wilson, Katherine Waterston, Reese Witherspoon, Benicio Del Toro, Martin Short and Jena Malone. It’s due for release in the UK on January 30.

This autumn Thom Yorke took to Twitter to confirm recording had been taking place at the Radiohead studio for the band’s newest LP. In a series of posts, the frontman revealed that he and Stanley Donwood – creator of the band’s artwork since 1994 – were going through 15 years’ worth of unused images and words, and that overdubs were happening in the studio on the second day of recording.

You can read our first look review of Inherent Vice Uncut – in shops now!


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