Gang Of Four co-founder and guitarist Andy Gill dies aged 64

"Our great friend and Supreme Leader has died"

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Andy Gill, guitarist and founding member of Gang Of Four, has died following a short respiratory illness.

The news was announced in a statement posted today (February 1) on the band’s official Twitter account. “This is so hard for us to write, but our great friend and Supreme Leader has died today,” the statement begins.

“Andy’s final tour in November was the only way he was ever really going to bow out; with a Stratocaster around his neck, screaming with feedback and deafening the front row.”

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Signed by his bandmates John Sterry, Thomas McNeice and Tobias Humble, Gill is described as “one of the best to ever do it,” adding that “his influence on guitar music and the creative process was inspiring for us, as well as everyone who worked alongside him and listened to his music.” Read the full post below.

Gill played guitar for Gang Of Four since the Leeds band’s inception in 1976, alongside original members Jon King, Dave Allen and Hugo Burnham. Though the band’s line up changed several times over the years, Gill remained the sole original member of Gang Of Four throughout – a career ranging from 1978 debut single “Damaged Goods” to 2019’s Happy Now, their most recent studio album.

Gill was also a highly respected producer, not only on much of Gang Of Four’s work, but several high-profile bands including Red Hot Chili Peppers, Killing Joke, Therapy?, The Jesus Lizard and The Futureheads.

Gill is survived by his wife Catherine Mayer, his brother Martin and “many family and elective family members who will miss him terribly” according to a separate press statement.

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