Robyn Hitchcock & John Paul Jones: Forget Led Zep, tonight was JPJ’s moment

We didn't realise quite how popular Robyn Hitchcock, the bard of all things surreal, is. The Big Top Tent at End Of The Road Festival was literally packed this evening. Or could the hordes have been there to see his sidekick, a meek man by the name of John Paul Jones? He's from some band called Led something. Anyway, this dude's hot, you should check him out sometime. Let's hope Robyn keeps him for more than one gig.

Trending Now

Fugazi’s Ian MacKaye: “We decided we were going to start a new scene”

The new issue of Uncut revisits the birth of post-hardcore in Washington DC

Mogwai: Album By Album

Founded in 1995 and initially a trio, Glasgow’s Mogwai made their debut with “Tuner/Lower”, a self-pressed seven-inch in thrall...

Pete Townshend looks back at The Who in 1967: “I don’t think I was angry”

Smashing guitars, hanging out with Small Faces and keeping Keith Moon onside

Introducing the Deluxe Ultimate Music Guide to Bob Marley

In-depths reviews and archive encounters with the reggae legend



We didn’t realise quite how popular Robyn Hitchcock, the bard of all things surreal, is. The Big Top Tent at End Of The Road Festival was literally packed this evening.

Or could the hordes have been there to see his sidekick, a meek man by the name of John Paul Jones? He’s from some band called Led something. Anyway, this dude’s hot, you should check him out sometime. Let’s hope Robyn keeps him for more than one gig.



Hitchcock was in his usual fantastic form tonight, spewing out bizarre anecdotes that will no doubt refuse to translate on your screen while sporting the best neo-psych shirt we’ve seen today.

Many of the songs the duo performed were unknown to us (the former Soft Boy does have an astounding number of solo albums), but at no point did the set drag, thanks in part to Jones‘ wonderful instrumental accompaniment. While not only playing the largest acoustic bass guitar we’ve ever seen anyone shoulder, the maestro also took on mandolin, slide guitar and backing vocals over the course of the set.

Highlights for the audience were ‘Balloon Man’ (“That’s just a taste of what you’ll see at the O2 tent on November 26,” quipped Hitchcock), the sublimely trippy ‘I Often Dream Of Trains’ and the title track of the recent ‘Ole! Tarantula’ album.

To be honest, Jones might be the more famous musician, but most of the audience were in fact here to see Hitchcock and his Barrett-esque tales. The fact that he was accompanied by one of the greatest instrumentalists of the modern age is an amazing bonus.

Words: Tom Pinnock
Pic credit: Michael Chapman

Advertisement

Latest Issue

The Who, New York Dolls, Fugazi, Peggy Seeger, Scritti Politti, Bob Dylan, Marvin Gaye, Serge Gainsbourg, Israel Nash and Valerie June
Advertisement

Features

Advertisement