Elvis Costello at Glastonbury 2013 – review

What with the sun blazing dangerously down on Worthy Farm, everyone seems to be in a blissful mood at Glastonbury this afternoon. Extraneous, and in some cases, all clothing layers have been shed, and the Southwest's supply of UV facepaints has been decimated.

Trending Now

The 1st Uncut Playlist Of 2021

I hope you've had a chance to pick up our first issue of 2021 - Leonard Cohen, The Clash,...

Leonard Cohen, The Clash, Sonny Rollins and more in the new Uncut

Occasionally, in the years since his death, I’ve found myself idly speculating on what Leonard Cohen would have made...

Introducing the Ultimate Music Guide to Marc Bolan and T.Rex

With an exclusive foreword by Tony Visconti

Ways to keep reading Uncut during lockdown

Even if you can't leave the house, there's no need to miss an issue

What with the sun blazing dangerously down on Worthy Farm, everyone seems to be in a blissful mood at Glastonbury this afternoon. Extraneous, and in some cases, all clothing layers have been shed, and the Southwest’s supply of UV facepaints has been decimated.

In the midst of such good vibes then, Elvis Costello & The Imposters could probably come out in front of the Pyramid Stage crowd and play a selection of B-sides without dampening anyone’s mood. Thankfully, there’s plenty of room for “Oliver’s Army” and company in his set.

A mid-show acoustic section is perhaps a little indulgent, especially on the stately swing-time ballad, “Jimmie Standing In The Rain”, but the set picks up with a rendition of Costello’s peerless anti-Thatcher song, “Tramp The Dirt Down”.

“I would never wish anyone dead…” he says. “This isn’t about burying a person, it’s about burying an idea.” It’s a moving performance, though a little out of place performed to people eating ice creams and falafel wraps.

Costello closes the set with a marathon run of classic songs, including “(I Don’t Want To Go To) Chelsea”, “Pump It Up” and “(What’s So Funny ‘Bout) Peace, Love And Understanding”. A solid ending – and a little more suitable for serving with warm pear cider.

Tom Pinnock

The Rolling Stones at Glastonbury 2013 – review
Portishead at Glastonbury 2013 – review
Goat at Glastonbury 2013 – review
Robyn Hitchcock & The Venus 3 at Glastonbury 2013 – review
Melody’s Echo Chamber at Glastonbury 2013 – review
Matthew E White at Glastonbury 2013 – review

Follow Tom on Twitter for more Glastonbury coverage: www.twitter.com/thomaspinnock


Advertisement

Latest Issue

Leonard Cohen, The Clash, Sonny Rollins, Jane Weaver, Kraftwerk, The Black Keys, Warren Zevon, Alice Cooper, Bootsy Collins and Courtney Marie Andrews
Advertisement

Features

Advertisement