Obi – Dice Man Lopez

Debut from London quartet named after an Arlo Guthrie creation, not an Alec Guinness character. Sorry

Trending Now

Pete Townshend looks back at The Who in 1967: “I don’t think I was angry”

Smashing guitars, hanging out with Small Faces and keeping Keith Moon onside

Mogwai: Album By Album

Founded in 1995 and initially a trio, Glasgow’s Mogwai made their debut with “Tuner/Lower”, a self-pressed seven-inch in thrall...

Introducing the new issue of Uncut

GETTING YOUR COPY OF THIS MONTH'S UNCUT DELIVERED STRAIGHT TO YOUR DOOR IS EASY AND HASSLE FREE - CLICK...

Introducing the Deluxe Ultimate Music Guide to Bob Marley

In-depths reviews and archive encounters with the reggae legend

If Alfie or Gorky’s yank your chain, chances are Obi will too. As on 2002’s sprightly mini album The Magic Land Of Radio, there are nods to classic American heritage (country-fiddler “Chewing My Soul”; “The Tale Of Old Rodriquez” trumpeting Arthur Lee-isms), but this is distinctly English fare, a latterday Lilac Time with Ian McCulloch out front. The La’s without the shoulder chips, perhaps. Leader Damian Katkhuda’s easy ear for a melody makes sad-sweet work of “Sleep Well Dear Friend” and the lovely “To Some Folk” which, wedded to Dom Hazlehurst’s soothing arpeggios, partly compensates for the lack of cutting edge.

Advertisement

Latest Issue

The Who, New York Dolls, Fugazi, Peggy Seeger, Scritti Politti, Bob Dylan, Marvin Gaye, Serge Gainsbourg, Israel Nash and Valerie June
Advertisement

Features

Advertisement