Chris Smither – Train Home

Born in Miami but weaned on the mid-'60's coffee house scene around Boston, Smither remains a strangely undiscovered talent. The 11th album of his 33-year recording career is a masterclass in deftly-picked country blues guitar, drawing on Lightnin' Hopkins and Mississippi John Hurt (a sunny-side-up cover of "Candy Man") alongside the more lugubrious Fred Neil. Smither's weathered old pipes are a joy as he tramples over melting chords like a bear with a migraine.

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Born in Miami but weaned on the mid-’60’s coffee house scene around Boston, Smither remains a strangely undiscovered talent. The 11th album of his 33-year recording career is a masterclass in deftly-picked country blues guitar, drawing on Lightnin’ Hopkins and Mississippi John Hurt (a sunny-side-up cover of “Candy Man”) alongside the more lugubrious Fred Neil. Smither’s weathered old pipes are a joy as he tramples over melting chords like a bear with a migraine. Old Boston running mate Bonnie Raitt joins him for a quietly stunning version of “Desolation Row”, replacing Dylan’s bile with weary acceptance. Warm and wise in equal measures.

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