There are no headless bats in Black Sabbath—Never Say Die SANCTUARYRating Star and Ozzy doesn't even get to shout, "Sharon, how does the DVD work?" But we do find Osbourne in typically headbanging form in a 1978 Sabbath concert that includes "War Pigs" and "Paranoid". No extras, though.

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There are no headless bats in Black Sabbath?Never Say Die SANCTUARYRating Star and Ozzy doesn’t even get to shout, “Sharon, how does the DVD work?” But we do find Osbourne in typically headbanging form in a 1978 Sabbath concert that includes “War Pigs” and “Paranoid”. No extras, though. Together Forever?Run-DMC Greatest Hits ARISTARating Star comes in the wake of the murder of Jam Master Jay, and supplements video hits with a decent mini-documentary. Yet once groundbreaking tracks such as “You Talk Too Much” seem tame today and don’t even merit hip hop’s now obligatory parental advisory sticker. There’s certainly one on Outlawz Worldwide EAGLE VISIONRating Star as Tupac’s former Death Row crew entertain groupies, discuss their weapons of choice and generally cuss their way through a package that at least recognises it takes more than a few old MTV videos to make a worthwhile DVD. The advantages of a decent budget are obvious on Ben Harper?Pleasure And Pain VIRGINRating Star , as director Danny Clinch creates a superior film about the charismatic singer’s life on and off the road. Plenty of live performances and extras. You wonder how Electric Prunes Rewired SNAPPERRating Star can work, given there’s no surviving footage of the psychedelic pioneers who gave us “I Had Too Much To Dream (Last Night)”. The clue is in the title: Rewired is based on their 2002 reunion tour, which limits its interest. Finally, compilations of ancient performances abound. Choose your era?So You Want To Be A Rock ‘n’Roll Star CLASSIC PICTURESRating Star contains performances from the late ’60s ranging from Thunderclap Newman to the Crazy World Of Arthur Brown, while Ice Cool Eighties UNCUT DVD CORating Star is narrated by Paul Morley and proves that decade had its share of highlights, from the Style Council to Julian Cope.