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Il Generale / dj kote giacalone

The Immortal Lee County Killers II – …Love Is A Charm Of Powerful Trouble

Punk blues recorded in a condemned shack

Smallville – Eastwest

The fastest-growing TV show in the US, wherein tales of a young Superman are accompanied by a radio-soft blend of American rock, from Remy Zero's theme to Ryan Adams' "Nuclear". Von Ray's "Inside Out" is the spit of Nickelback, and the new single. Best thing here by a mile is The Flaming Lips' "Fight Test", the opening track of what's been described in these pages as the greatest album since Best Of Jesus Christ Volume One. It's lovely, but owes an extraordinary debt to the Cat Stevens song "Father To Son".

Medium 21 – Killings From The Dial

Young English heirs to The Flaming Lips

Harry Nilsson – The Point

Fairytale concept album from 1970 that evolved into first feature-length, made-for-TV animated musical

April March – Triggers

Second album from former Ren And Stimpy writer and animator

Mark Bacino – The Million Dollar Milkshake

Power pop with guts

The Wild Thornberrys Movie – Jive

An animated kiddies' thing which, to my untrained eye, looks scarily like Rugrats, this is set in the African wilderness. And has elephants in it. So you don't need to trouble your inner genius to work out that Peter Gabriel, Youssou N'Dour and Paul Simon will feature. "Father And Daughter" is the latter's first song for a film in 15 years, and he can still turn a lyric and craft a tune like an unlikely deft demi-god. He can even mumble "trust your intuition, it's just like goin'fishin'" and sound wry. It's no "Mrs Robinson" but it's warm as a puma's gums.

The Driller Killer

Abel Ferrara's 1979 directorial debut achieved notoriety as a video nasty, but those seeking gore will be largely disappointed. It's an exceedingly bleak portrait of an artist (Ferrara) cracking up and relieving the stress by offing homeless bums with a hand drill. Doom-laden angst that's almost unbearable on any level.

Miracle Mile – Alaska

Gentle melodic pop and weeping pedal steels from British singer-songwriter

Villa Des Roses

Belgian director Frank Van Passel's handsome Euro-pudding adaptation of a novel by Flemish writer Willem Elsschot evokes bohemian, early 20th-century Paris with sepia-toned style—think Moulin Rouge meets Delicatessen. Sadly, a fine ensemble cast (including Julie Delpy, Shirley Henderson, Timothy West) are wasted on a routine, soapy plot about class, manners, infidelity and looming war. DVD EXTRAS: Trailers and scene selection.Rating Star
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