Stereolab to reissue their Switched On comps

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Stereolab have announced the reissue of their three Switched On compilations from the ’90s, via their own Duophonic UHF Disks.

1992’s Switched On, 1995’s Refried Ectoplasm (Switched On Volume 2) and 1998’s Aluminum Tunes (Switched on Volume 3) have all been remastered by Calyx Mastering of Berlin, and will be re-released on September 28.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home – with no delivery charge!

Initial copies of each LP will be pressed on clear vinyl. The CD boxset will include all three compilations in individual card wallets plus an insert. Each of the albums will also be available on the usual digital services.

Check out the full tracklistings below:

Switched On LP

A1. Super Electric
A2. Doubt
A3. Au Grand Jour’
A4. The Way Will Be Opening
A5. Brittle
B1. Contact
B2. Au Grand Jour
B3. High Expectation
B4. The Light That Will Cease To Fail
B5. Changer

Refried Ectoplasm (Switched On Volume 2) LP

A1. Harmonium
A2. Lo Boob Oscillator
A3. Mountain
A4. Revox
B1. French Disko
B2. Exploding Head Movie
B3. Eloge D’Eros
B4. Tone Burst [Country]
C1. “Animal Or Vegetable [A Wonderful Wooden Reason…]” [Crumb Duck]
D1. John Cage Bubblegum
D2. Sadistic
D3. Farfisa
D4. Tempter

Aluminum Tunes (Switched On Volume 3)

A1. Pop Quiz
A2. The Extension Trip
A3. How To Play Your Internal Organs Overnight
A4. The Brush Descends The Length
A5. Melochord Seventy-Five
A6. Space Moment
B1. Iron Man
B2. The Long Hair Of Death
B3. You Used To Call Me Sadness
B4. New Orthophony
C1. Speedy Car
C2. Golden Atoms
C3. Ulan Bator
C4. One Small Step
D1. One Note Samba / Surfboard
D2. Cadriopo
D3. Klang Tone
E1. Get Carter
E2. 1000 Miles An Hour
E3. Percolations
E4. Seeperbold
F1. Check And Double Check
F2. Munich Madness
F3. Metronomic Underground (Wagon Christ Mix)
F4. The Incredible He Woman

The October 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jimi Hendrix on the cover. Elsewhere in the issue, you’ll find exclusive features on Spiritualized, Aretha Franklin, Richard Thompson, Soft Cell, Pink Floyd, Candi Staton, Garcia Peoples, Beach Boys, Mudhoney, Big Red Machine and many more. Our free CD showcases 15 tracks of this month’s best new music, including Beak>, Low, Christine And The Queens, Marissa Nadler and Eric Bachman.

John & Yoko’s Imagine film re-released with unseen footage

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John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s impressionistic visual interpretation of the Imagine album is to be re-shown in select cinemas on September 18.

Originally released in 1972, the 81-minute film featured amateur video footage of the couple at home in Tittenhurst Park and in New York City, as well as mingling with celebrities such as Andy Warhol and Fred Astaire, set to the entire tracklisting of Imagine and a few songs from Ono’s 1971 album Fly.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home – with no delivery charge!

Imagine has now been extended by 15 minutes to include never-before-released footage of Lennon playing “How Do You Sleep?” and “Oh My Love” with his band, which featured George Harrison, Nicky Hopkins, Alan White and Klaus Voormann. The soundtrack has been remixed and remastered in Dolby Atmos and 7.1 surround sound.

Watch the Imagine trailer below and find out where you can see the film here.

The October 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jimi Hendrix on the cover. Elsewhere in the issue, you’ll find exclusive features on Spiritualized, Aretha Franklin, Richard Thompson, Soft Cell, Pink Floyd, Candi Staton, Garcia Peoples, Beach Boys, Mudhoney, Big Red Machine and many more. Our free CD showcases 15 tracks of this month’s best new music, including Beak>, Low, Christine And The Queens, Marissa Nadler and Eric Bachman.

Exclusive! Hear the whole of Oh Sees’ new album, Smote Reverser

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On Friday (August 17), John Dwyer’s thundering psych-rock outfit Oh Sees – known also as Thee Oh Sees, The Oh Sees and OCS – release their excellent new album, Smote Reverser.

In the current issue of Uncut, we hailed its “exploration of an uncluttered stage of rhythm and space, Dwyer’s guitar providing insterstellar interference”, with the opening tracks “discovering an evolutionary moment between Can’s ‘Oh Yeah’ and Deep Purple’s heavy departure from psychedelic garage.”

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home – with no delivery charge!

You can read the full review in the current issue of Uncut – on sale now – while listening to the whole album exclusively below:



Oh Sees
tour the UK soon, dates below:

31/08 – Margate – Winter Gardens
1/09 – Dorset – End Of The Road Festival
2/09 – Bristol – O2 Academy
3/09 – London – O2 The Forum

The October 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jimi Hendrix on the cover. Elsewhere in the issue, you’ll find exclusive features on Spiritualized, Aretha Franklin, Richard Thompson, Soft Cell, Pink Floyd, Candi Staton, Garcia Peoples, Beach Boys, Mudhoney, Big Red Machine and many more. Our free CD showcases 15 tracks of this month’s best new music, including Beak>, Low, Christine And The Queens, Marissa Nadler and Eric Bachman.

Hear a track from Mount Eerie’s new live album

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Phil Elverum AKA Mount Eerie will release a new live album called (After) on September 21.

It was recorded on November 10 last year at the Jacobikerk, a 13th century gothic church in Utrecht, during Le Guess Who? festival.

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Hear a track from it, “Soria Moria”, below:

Writing about the live performances that followed the release of his grief-stricken 2017 album A Crow Looked At Me, Elverum says: “I was lucky to get to perform these songs in very well suited and beautiful rooms, nice theaters and churches, to kind and supportive listeners. The concerts ended up being something beyond strange, macabre, gawk-shows. I don’t know what they were exactly. Just strangers gathered in beautiful rooms to pay close attention to one person’s difficult details, and to open up together, quietly. They have been the most powerful shows of my life, no question.

“Even so, every time it was clear that the audiences shared the same apprehensions that I had. After the first song, every time, there was a palpable hanging question in the air: “should we clap?”. It’s a good question. What is this? Is it entertainment? What is applause for? What kind of ritual is this? Many close friends have still not listened to the records or come to a concert. What, beyond pain, is embodied here? I don’t know exactly what my job is, traveling around and delivering these feelings. The concerts in 2017 and 2018 have been unusual, unexplainable, and great.

“The best one was at Le Guess Who? festival in Utrecht, Netherlands on November 10th, 2017. Nobody was supposed to be recording these shows but fortunately someone didn’t get that message and this beautiful recording of that show has surfaced.”

The October 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jimi Hendrix on the cover. Elsewhere in the issue, you’ll find exclusive features on Spiritualized, Aretha Franklin, Richard Thompson, Soft Cell, Pink Floyd, Candi Staton, Garcia Peoples, Beach Boys, Mudhoney, Big Red Machine and many more. Our free CD showcases 15 tracks of this month’s best new music, including Beak>, Low, Christine And The Queens, Marissa Nadler and Eric Bachman.

Television’s Marquee Moon gets deluxe vinyl reissue

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The deluxe version of Television’s classic album Marquee Moon will be released on vinyl for the first time on October 2.

Pressed on blue vinyl, the first disc features the original album while the second disc features four out-takes and alternate versions, plus the full-length version of single “Little Johnny Jewel”.

These tracks were originally included on the 2003 CD reissue of Marquee Moon but several of them have never been released on vinyl before.

See the full tracklisting below:

LP1 (Original Album)
Side one

‘See No Evil’
‘Venus’
‘Friction’
‘Marquee Moon’
Side two
‘Elevation’
‘Guiding Light’
‘Prove It’
‘Torn Curtain’

LP2 (Bonus Tracks)
Side three

‘Little Johnny Jewel’ (Parts 1 & 2)
‘See No Evil’ (Alternate Version)
‘Friction’ (Alternate Version)
Side four:
‘Marquee Moon’ (Alternate Version)
‘Untitled’ (Instrumental)

The October 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jimi Hendrix on the cover. Elsewhere in the issue, you’ll find exclusive features on Spiritualized, Aretha Franklin, Richard Thompson, Soft Cell, Pink Floyd, Candi Staton, Garcia Peoples, Beach Boys, Mudhoney, Big Red Machine and many more. Our free CD showcases 15 tracks of this month’s best new music, including Beak>, Low, Christine And The Queens, Marissa Nadler and Eric Bachman.

Teenage Fanclub on their finest albums: “If writing songs wasn’t difficult, everyone would be doing it!”

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“It’s not as if we live fabulous lives,” says Gerard Love. “We just live normal lives like everyone, so to try and find something you think is worth singing about, and that fits the music, becomes quite difficult.”

Over the past three decades, Teenage Fanclub have made it look easy, though, writing consistently exquisite songs that nod to ’60s sunshine pop and folk-rock as much as they do to the grungier sounds of electric Neil Young. “If it wasn’t difficult, though, everybody would be doing it,” adds Love, “and then you wouldn’t be able to make a living!”

The Fannies are today in the perfect state of mind to look back across their work so far – they’re about to release remastered LP versions of their five Creation records, and are getting ready to rehearse for live shows later this year that will find them performing most of their back catalogue. “There are some songs you like better than others,” says Norman Blake, “and others where you feel you didn’t get there. I don’t think we would ever do anything that was very left-field, though; it just doesn’t make sense for us to do that. The band really is a vehicle for songwriters, so we’re not gonna do a Trans…”

Originally published in Uncut’s August 2018 issue

_________________________

A CATHOLIC EDUCATION
PAPERHOUSE/MATADOR, 1990
The noisier debut album, very much the odd one out

NORMAN BLAKE (guitar, vocals): Teenage Fanclub then was a continuation of what Raymond and I had been doing in The Boy Hairdressers. We’d been around a lot of people trying to get record deals, and we thought, ‘That’s too much like hard work, let’s just make a record.’ Raymond inherited a fridge and an oven, so he sold those, and we bought some studio time, then we realised we had to get a band together.
GERARD LOVE (bass, vocals): I met Norman at a gig in May 1989, and then later on they asked if I’d be interested in joining them to record the album. By mid-July we were in the studio. To this day, I don’t know why they asked me to be in the band. A case of mistaken identity? I think the only thing in their mind was to make an album. I loved the proactive energy they had.
FRANCIS MACDONALD (drums): I’d been in The Boy Hairdressers with Norman and Raymond – I’d always said, “I’m happy to be on the record, but I’ll probably go back to university and finish my studies afterwards.”
BLAKE: We did some recording at a studio in Glasgow called Pet Sounds, run by Wet Wet Wet! Then Francis decided to go back to university, so we were looking for a drummer, and somehow hooked up with Brendan [O’Hare]. So we thought we’d try a few different versions of some of the songs, just to have Brendan involved. At the time, we liked Sonic Youth, and we were listening to Exile On Main Street, which I think you can sort of hear in a lot of the chord shapes. Also Syd Barrett-era Pink Floyd.
RAYMOND McGINLEY (guitar, vocals): Funnily enough, this is the record that we’ve done in the most separated way. I’ve got a memory of Gerry doing all his bass parts one after the other.
MACDONALD: One of the “Heavy Metal” tracks has got a bit of a drum mistake. We listened back, and there was this shrug like, “If you’re not listening for it, you won’t notice it.” I find it quite unlistenable now because that mistake jumps out – but that was the attitude, ‘It’ll be fine.’ They had no funding either, so they were watching the clock.
LOVE: I never get tired of playing “Everything Flows” – it’s solid gold.

Introducing the new Uncut

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We live in difficult times – and sometimes it is hard to know what the appropriate response should be. A couple of recent records have done an excellent job navigating perilous current events. Sons Of Kemet’s splendid album Your Queen Is A Reptile found fresh ways to explore cultural identity, while Sleaford Mods continue to hone their lacerating observations of contemporary Britain on a new self-titled EP. In America, meanwhile, Moses Sumney’s “Rank & File” and Lonnie Holley’s “I Woke Up In A Fucked Up America” have responded equally forcefully to social and cultural upheaval. Holley, the 68 year-old experimental musician, has described MITH – his new album – as a work of “concrete and tears; of dirt and blood; of injustice and hope”. ‘Hope’ seems a critical word here: what use are demonstrations or protests without the possibility that they will, in the end, achieve a positive outcome?

It is a sentiment, you might suspect, many people also expressed 50 years ago – during another period of uncertainty and disruption. This month’s Uncut – on sale Thursday but you can have a copy sent to you FOR FREE directly at home – digs deep into 1968, where the release of Jimi Hendrix’ Electric Ladyland provides us the opportunity to survey the extraordinary events of that era. With help from Hendrix’s collaborators, friends and confidants, Peter Watts has written a typically detailed and fascinating account of the album’s origins and its place in the wider cultural and social landscape. “There was turmoil across the world and everybody knew that was part of the landscape,” Jack Casady from Jefferson Airplane tells Peter. “Nobody tried to avoid it, it was the context.”

Peter has also assembled a crack list of 30 albums from ’68 and thereabouts that, like Electric Ladyland, were attuned to the wider social and political tensions. We hope you agree with our list: but by all means drop us a line at uncut_feedback@ti-media.com with your own suggestions.

Don’t forget you can get the current issue of Uncut sent to you FOR FREE directly at home: here’s how

Elsewhere in this issue, you can read new interviews with Soft Cell, Spiritualized, Richard Thompson, Mudhoney, The Beach Boys, Candi Station, the most excellent Garcia Peoples and more. We discover all about two brilliant new collaborative projects – Big Red Machine, from The National and Bon Iver, and Harmony Rockets, from Mercury Rev and folk guitarist Peter Walker. There’s Aretha Franklin, Nick Mason and also the inimitable Paul McCartney – back at the Cavern (or a Cavern, more precisely).

There’s also some excellent new music to share on our free CD – including Low, Beak>, The Other Years, Christine And The Queens, Swamp Dogg and Oliver Coates. But for now, I’ll leave you with a quote from Richard Thompson who, among many other things in our wide-ranging new interview, offers some reflections on songwriting that seem fortuitously apt. “You can’t fail to reflect your own morality in what you write,” he tells Tom Pinnock. “It has to be in there, and I know it is. But I don’t like people beating me over the head with their beliefs, I find it repulsive, so I try not to do it to other people. I hope what I do is non-dogmatic and subtle. My songs are about the human heart and the human condition.”

Enjoy this new issue of Uncut.

Follow me on Twitter @MichaelBonner

The October 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jimi Hendrix on the cover. Elsewhere in the issue, you’ll find exclusive features on Spiritualized, Aretha Franklin, Richard Thompson, Soft Cell, Pink Floyd, Candi Staton, Garcia Peoples, Beach Boys, Mudhoney, Big Red Machine and many more. Our free CD showcases 15 tracks of this month’s best new music, including Beak>, Low, Christine And The Queens, Marissa Nadler and Eric Bachman.

Jeff Tweedy announces details of new memoir

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Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy has announced details of a new memoir.

Let’s Go (So We Can Get Back): A Memoir Of Recording And Discording With Wilco, Etc, will be published by Faber & Faber on November 22.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home – with no delivery charge!

According to the press release, “Jeff will tell stories about his childhood in Belleville, Illinois; the St. Louis record store, rock clubs, and live-music circuit that sparked his songwriting and performing career; and the Chicago scene that brought it all together. He’ll also talk in-depth about his collaborators in Uncle Tupelo, Wilco, and more; and write lovingly about his parents, wife Sue, and sons, Spencer and Sam.”

Jeff Tweedy
headlines the Garden Stage at End Of The Road festival in Wiltshire on August 31.

The September 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Rod Stewart on the cover. Elsewhere in the issue, you’ll find exclusive features on Pixies, The Byrds, Jess Williamson, Liverpool’s post-punk scene, Sly Stone, Gruff Rhys, White Denim, Beth Orton, Mary Lattimore and many more. Our free CD showcases 15 tracks of this month’s best new music, including Oh Sees, Cowboy Junkies, Elephant Micah, Papa M and Odetta Hartman.

Hear another unreleased Joe Strummer track

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Joe Strummer 001, a 32-track anthology of The Clash frontman’s solo output, will be released on September 28.

It contains a number of unreleased tracks – including “Rose Of Erin”, which originates from the unreleased soundtrack to the 1993 Sara Driver film, When Pigs Fly (starring Marianne Faithfull). Hear it below:

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home – with no delivery charge!

You can read a comprehensive review of Joe Strummer 001 in the new issue of Uncut, in shops on Thursday (August 16) or available to buy online later today. The magazine also features an interview with Joe’s wife Lucinda Tait and producer Robert Gordon McHarg III who compiled the anthology.

“Rose of Erin” is available now – along with the tracks “It’s A Rockin’ World” and “London Is Burning” – when you pre-order the album digitally and from the online store.

The September 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Rod Stewart on the cover. Elsewhere in the issue, you’ll find exclusive features on Pixies, The Byrds, Jess Williamson, Liverpool’s post-punk scene, Sly Stone, Gruff Rhys, White Denim, Beth Orton, Mary Lattimore and many more. Our free CD showcases 15 tracks of this month’s best new music, including Oh Sees, Cowboy Junkies, Elephant Micah, Papa M and Odetta Hartman.

October 2018

Have a copy sent direct to your door!

Jimi Hendrix, Aretha Franklin, Soft Cell and Spiritualized all feature in the new issue of Uncut, dated October 2018.

Hendrix is on the cover, and inside, Peter Watts explores how Electric Ladyland channelled a righteous revolution 50 years ago. The guitarist’s closest friends and collaborators – from Eddie Kramer, Steve Winwood, Dave Davies and Robert Wyatt to Joe Boyd, Dave Mason and TaharQa Aleem – recall heavy times and even heavier jams. “The gate was open,” says one, “and with Jimi, there was always a plan.”

To celebrate a half-century of the album, we also present another 30 radical albums that shook the world, from The Doors and Miles Davis to Curtis Mayfield and Nina Simone.

Also in the issue, key players tell Graeme Thomson about the making of Aretha Franklin’s “I Never Loved A Man (The Way I Love You)”, a session that “changed everything” and unleashed the Queen of Soul’s full potential.

As Soft Cell release a new boxset, Marc Almond and Dave Ball trace their faltering steps from Leeds Poly to the depraved club scene in New York and, now, to a “terrifying” show at London’s O2. “It was sex, drugs and electronic rock’n’roll!” one eyewitness tells Stephen Troussé.

Back in orbit after a long hiatus, Jason Pierce tells Piers Martin about the obsessive, solitary process of creating Spiritualized’s new album, And Nothing Hurt – a record he claims may be his last. “I function pretty reasonably,” he tells us.

Richard Thompson returns with a new album, the raw 13 Rivers, and Tom Pinnock meets him for a tour of Hampstead and a trip down memory lane, taking in Fairport Convention, Richard & Linda and life in Trump’s America. “You can’t fail to reflect your own morality in what you write,” he says.

Meanwhile, Nick Mason answers your questions on Pink Floyd, his famous moustache, cars and cooking – “sharp knives and alcohol, what’s not to like?” – while Mudhoney take us through the best albums of their career and Candi Staton reveals her favourite records.

Brian Wilson, Mike Love and more reveal how The Beach Boys were creatively revitalized between Wild Honey and Surf’s Up, making some of the most glorious music of their career. “The Beach Boys would never be the same again,” they tell Rob Hughes.

In our Instant Karma section, we catch Paul McCartney’s Cavern show, and hang out with Harmony Rockets, Garcia Peoples and Big Red Machine, the new project from Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon and The National’s Aaron Dessner.

Our reviews section features new releases from Low, Paul Simon, Paul McCartney, Anna Calvi, Dawn Landes, The Lemon Twigs, Paul Weller, Beak> and more, and archival treasures from Joe Strummer, Bobbie Gentry, the Trojan label and more – while we check out new films including Lucky, Yardie and Cold War and DVDs, Blu-rays and TV on Joni Mitchell, Leonard Cohen and Samuel Fuller. In the live arena, we’ve got reviews of Rosanne Cash and the Hyde Park BST shows, and in books, Wayne Kramer and Mars By 1980.

This month’s free CD, Electric Wonderland, features 15 tracks of the month’s best new music, from Richard Thompson, Beak>, Low, Christine & The Queens, Spiritualized, The Other Years, Dawn Landes, Mudhoney, Oliver Coates and more.

The new Uncut, dated October 2018, is out on August 16th.

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Sky Arts to screen New Order documentary

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Sky Arts will screen a new feature-length documentary about New Order on September 22 at 9pm.

Directed by Mike Christie, New Order: Decades follows the band as they prepare for their 2017 So It Goes… concerts at the Manchester International Festival, where they reimagined their back catalogue for a 12-piece synthesiser orchestra.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home – with no delivery charge!

According to the press release, “New Order: Decades offers a rare chance to enter the band’s private world, understand the visual philosophy of their aesthetic and design, and witness their collaborative, creative processes first-hand.”

The September 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Rod Stewart on the cover. Elsewhere in the issue, you’ll find exclusive features on Pixies, The Byrds, Jess Williamson, Liverpool’s post-punk scene, Sly Stone, Gruff Rhys, White Denim, Beth Orton, Mary Lattimore and many more. Our free CD showcases 15 tracks of this month’s best new music, including Oh Sees, Cowboy Junkies, Elephant Micah, Papa M and Odetta Hartman.

The 26th Uncut new music playlist of 2018

Something calm (ish) to end the week; some beautiful work from Big Thief’s Adrianne Lenker and the brackish folk of Mountain Man’s Amelia Meath, Alexandra Sauser-Monnig, and Molly Sarlé, as well as the witchy charms of Vera Sola. Some choons, too, thanks to returning Aphex, Lindstrøm and Mount Kimbie.

Anyway, have a good weekend – we’re back next week a new issue.

More of that soon…

Follow me on Twitter @MichaelBonner

1.
ADRIANNE LENKER

“abysskiss”
(Saddle Creek)

2.
MOUNTAIN MAN

“Rang Tang Ring Toon”
(Bella Union)

3.
MATTHEW DEAR

“Bunny’s Dream”
(Ghostly International)

4.
APHEX TWIN

“T69 Collapse”
(Warp)

5.
MOUNT KIMBIE

“Southgate”
(K7 Records)

6.
LINDSTRØM

“Blinded By The LEDs”
(Feedelity Recordings/Smalltown Supersound)

7.
ALYNDA SEGARRA

“Dunken Angel”
(Light In The Attic)

8.
BIG RED MACHINE

“I Won’t Run From It”
(Jagjaguwar)

9.
JERRY PAPER

“Grey Area”
(Stones Throw)

10.
VERA SOLA

“Small Minds”
(Spectraphonic Records)

11.
TUNE-YARDS + MOORS

“Mango”
(4AD)

12.
RESOUND

“I Will Always Love You”
(Spacebomb)

The September 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Rod Stewart on the cover. Elsewhere in the issue, you’ll find exclusive features on Pixies, The Byrds, Jess Williamson, Liverpool’s post-punk scene, Sly Stone, Gruff Rhys, White Denim, Beth Orton, Mary Lattimore and many more. Our free CD showcases 15 tracks of this month’s best new music, including Oh Sees, Cowboy Junkies, Elephant Micah, Papa M and Odetta Hartman.

Dave Evans – The Words In Between

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Bangor-born singer, songwriter and guitarist Dave Evans briefly popped up in 2010 on a compilation called Ghosts From The Basement, which raided defunct Bristol label Village Thing’s vaults from the early ’70s and featured tracks by Wizz Jones, Steve Tilston and label co-founder Ian A Anderson, among others. Two songs by Evans (one from this debut) were included, and although it hardly turned him into a household name, this seems to have nudged a wheel into motion.

Beyond that compilation, enthusiasts of 
late-’60s and ’70s British pastoral folk might 
have found Evans’ The Words In Between by following their love of Nick Drake to Tilston’s 
1971 debut, An Acoustic Confusion, on which Evans played second guitar and sang. When Tilston invited his former flatmate to join him 
in Bristol for recording, Evans was living in Honiton and working as a designer at the local pottery, but left a week after he got back and moved to Bristol, where he got a job as a road inspector and became a resident singer at the Troubadour. He released four albums and in the late ’70s moved to Brussels, where he still lives, repairing and restoring musical instruments 
and playing for pleasure.

Don’t forget you can get the current issue of Uncut sent to you FOR FREE directly at home: here’s how

Evans has inevitably been overshadowed by necromancers of fingerpicking and alternative tunings, Fahey, Graham, Jansch and Renbourn, but his guitar technique – mostly performed on a distinctive, green-topped acoustic he made himself and using low-C tuning, plus the 
odd percussive thwack – dazzles. Footage 
of his Old Grey Whistle Test performance of “Stagefright” is mesmerising, and although 
that song is from his second album, Evans’ playing on his debut impresses in an equally unflashy way. Rather than flights of mystic fancy, the songs are sweetly observed, quotidian vignettes often featuring characters he knew: the touching, Fred Neil-ish “City Road”, which depicts a day in the life of that Bristol street; and the forlorn but fond “Rosie”, the sketch of a woman (“Only very slightly round the bend”) Evans lodged with in Honiton.

The album – well received in its day – features Pete Airey on second guitar, harmonica player Keith Warmington and harmony singer Adrienne Webber, and was recorded in Anderson’s basement flat in Bristol, using two microphones plugged directly into a reel-to-reel. The setup suits both the intimacy of the songs and Evans’ light, unfussy voice, which is less mournful than Nick Drake’s, and shines particularly brightly on breezy closer “Sailor”.

It’s odd that it’s taken so long for new light to be cast on The Words In Between, given that archival interest in obscure ’60s/’70s British folk has never been stronger, but maybe Evans’ own character is partly responsible. According to former label boss Anderson, “He never really got motivated to the struggles of a big-time music career.” Accidental success for an ambivalent star, then – cult status guaranteed.

The September 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Rod Stewart on the cover. Elsewhere in the issue, you’ll find exclusive features on Pixies, The Byrds, Jess Williamson, Liverpool’s post-punk scene, Sly Stone, Gruff Rhys, White Denim, Beth Orton, Mary Lattimore and many more. Our free CD showcases 15 tracks of this month’s best new music, including Oh Sees, Cowboy Junkies, Elephant Micah, Papa M and Odetta Hartman.

Hear two new Big Red Machine songs

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Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon and The National’s Aaron Dessner have released two more Big Red Machine songs as part of a mixtape showcasing their new collaborative music platform, People.

People Mixtape 1 features Vernon and Dessner in several other permutations, collaborating with the likes of Kristin Anna Valtysdottir (Múm), Ryan Olson (Gayngs) and Mouse On Mars, as well as new music from Mina Tindle and Beat Detectives.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home – with no delivery charge!

There is also an intriguing team-up between Dessner, Lisa Hannigan and playwright Enda Walsh, plus a track from Aaron and Bryce Dessner’s acoustic folk project Red Bird Hollow.

Listen to People Mixtape 1 below:

The People festival takes place on August 18-19 in Berlin, while Big Red Machine’s debut album is released on August 31. You can read much more about both endeavours in the new issue of Uncut, out next week (August 16).

The September 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Rod Stewart on the cover. Elsewhere in the issue, you’ll find exclusive features on Pixies, The Byrds, Jess Williamson, Liverpool’s post-punk scene, Sly Stone, Gruff Rhys, White Denim, Beth Orton, Mary Lattimore and many more. Our free CD showcases 15 tracks of this month’s best new music, including Oh Sees, Cowboy Junkies, Elephant Micah, Papa M and Odetta Hartman.

Ray Davies – Our Country: Americana Act II

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Ray Davies has often had an uneasy relationship with America. The Kinks were banned from touring in the States between 1965 and 1969; many years later, in 2004, Davies was shot in New Orleans, where he lived at the time. The latter incident cast a shadow over his first two solo albums, Other People’s Lives (2006) and Working Man’s Café (2007) – to the extent that a number of songs from Working Man’s Café were written in the emergency ward during Davies’ recovery from gunshot wounds. As anyone who has read his 2013 memoir, Americana, will attest, these events understandably continue to nag at Davies.

Today, the American experiences are among the thematic sources for his latest set of albums, along with 1972 LP Everybody’s In Show-Biz – which reported from life on tour in the States, once it restarted – and its great predecessor, Muswell Hillbillies (1971). But the Americana albums view events from a distance. The content has been left to settle – in some cases for decades. For instance, “A Place In Your Heart”, from last year’s Americana, dated from the 1980s.

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Our Country takes this process further. The album is littered with remakes of earlier songs and references to his wider career. He re-records “Oklahoma USA”, the gorgeous song from Muswell Hillbillies, along with “The Getaway” from Other People’s Lives and “The Real World” from Working Man’s Café. Meanwhile, “See My Friends” recalls 
the Mississippi setting of “Calling 
Home”, while “Muswell Hillbilly” 
haunts “Muswell Kills”. Everything 
here remains personal, but it is also 
a cooler proposition.

There’s a degree of studio craft and narrative control here that Davies has never bettered. Preservation Act 1 and 2 (1973-4), the project Americana most recalls in scale and title, suffered from all the lumbering, prosaic faults of 1970s rock operas. Today, after his experience on the successful Sunny Afternoon musical, Davies has the technique to match his ambitions. He also has The Jayhawks – house band on this project, who have spoken about Davies directing their high-energy sessions in the spirit 
of a theatrical production. As Kinks 
fans, they are more amenable to such control than The Kinks themselves ever were. When “The Invaders”, from Americana, is replayed as a spoken-word duet with John Dagleish – the actor who played Davies in Sunny Afternoon – and the narrative of Our Country moves towards Davies’ shooting, the threads 
of a future theatre piece are clear. 
Davies’ old conceptual desires are 
being realised again.

The opening track inadvertently addresses current concerns with its wish to “make this country great once more”. Written long before Brexit, it splices Davies’s move from what was then Blair’s Britain to New Orleans together with the dreams of more fervent American immigrants. Typically, the effect is ambiguous. The album then follows several characters’ stories. “We Will Get There” is a lullaby for an internal migrant, where Karen Grotberg’s keyboard washes add to Davies’ companionable support for his protagonist’s unsteady progress. Like “Louisiana Sky”, it has the feeling of a dream. “A Street Called Hope” is a lovely, jazzy effort about avoiding the pitfalls waiting at the dark end of the street, which precedes the existential “The Empty Room”.

Throughout, The Jayhawks replicate the post-war American styles that have inspired Davies though the years – everything from doo-wop to crunching blues. Just when Our Country is starting to drift in the slipstream of such comfortable sounds, “The Take” adds a sneering jolt of CBGB energy, as Grotberg adopts the persona of Roxy, a “rock chick” looking to “fuck me an icon tonight”. Davies’s own slyly humorous vocal fully enters into the raunchy spirit of the song.

Our Country’s final section halts the restless, self-destructive momentum of the earlier songs. Instead, it settles into Davies’s New Orleans sojourn, awaiting the gunshot. In “The Big Guy”, we find him after it hits, facedown and shivering in the gutter. But that’s when Davies springs his most satisfying surprise. Abandoning all decorum, Davies – the original London punk – bellows out the chorus of “Muswell Hillbilly” and gives his mugger a gleeful kicking. It’s taken 
14 years, four albums and one book to reach that purging moment. It’s worth it.

The September 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Rod Stewart on the cover. Elsewhere in the issue, you’ll find exclusive features on Pixies, The Byrds, Jess Williamson, Liverpool’s post-punk scene, Sly Stone, Gruff Rhys, White Denim, Beth Orton, Mary Lattimore and many more. Our free CD showcases 15 tracks of this month’s best new music, including Oh Sees, Cowboy Junkies, Elephant Micah, Papa M and Odetta Hartman.

Hear A Certain Ratio’s new track, featuring Barry Adamson and Tony Wilson

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A Certain Ratio have announced the release of a new ‘best of’ compilation called acr:set on October 12.

It includes two brand new tracks, their first new music for a decade. Hear one of them, “Dirty Boy”, below. It features vocals by Barry Adamson as well as a recording of Tony Wilson preparing the band for “The Fox” recording session.

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Check out the tracklisting for acr:set below and pre-order the album here:

Do The Du (Casse) (1979)
Wild Party – 12” version (1985)
Flight – 12” version (1980)
And Then Again – 12” version (1980)
Forced Laugh (1981)
Wonder Y (1992)
Mickey Way (12” version, 1986)
27 Forever – 7” version (1991)
Won’t Stop Loving You – Bernard Sumner mix (1990)
Good Together – 12” version (1990)
Be What You Wanna Be – 12” version (1990)
Shack Up – 7” version (1980)
The Fox – US 12” version (1980)
Knife Slits Water – 7” version (1982)
Si Firmir O Grido (1986)
Dirty Boy Extended – featuring Barry Adamson (2018)
Make It Happen (2018)

The September 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Rod Stewart on the cover. Elsewhere in the issue, you’ll find exclusive features on Pixies, The Byrds, Jess Williamson, Liverpool’s post-punk scene, Sly Stone, Gruff Rhys, White Denim, Beth Orton, Mary Lattimore and many more. Our free CD showcases 15 tracks of this month’s best new music, including Oh Sees, Cowboy Junkies, Elephant Micah, Papa M and Odetta Hartman.

George Harrison’s Cavern guitar up for auction

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The guitar that George Harrison played at The Beatles’ last ever Cavern Club show is to be auctioned next month.

1963 Maton Mastersound MS-500 was loaned to Harrison in the summer of 1963 by Barratts in Manchester while his Gretsch Country Gentleman was being repaired.

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Although his Gretsch was quickly returned, Harrison kept the Maton for a few months, playing it at concerts throughout July and August 1963, including The Beatles’ last performance at The Cavern Club in Liverpool on August 3.

After the Maton was returned to Barratts, it was picked up by Roy Barber of Dave Berry And The Cruisers. Barber’s widow Val auctioned it in 2002, and it was auctioned again in 2015 with a listed ‘sold’ price of $485,000. For the auction on September 12 at Gardiner Houlgate near Bath, the guitar has been given an estimate of £300,000 – £400,000.

Also going under the hammer is a Pink Floyd amplifier, a guitar owned by Steve Howe and an acoustic guitar used by the Bee Gees’ Maurice Gibb to compose “Jive Talkin'”.

The September 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Rod Stewart on the cover. Elsewhere in the issue, you’ll find exclusive features on Pixies, The Byrds, Jess Williamson, Liverpool’s post-punk scene, Sly Stone, Gruff Rhys, White Denim, Beth Orton, Mary Lattimore and many more. Our free CD showcases 15 tracks of this month’s best new music, including Oh Sees, Cowboy Junkies, Elephant Micah, Papa M and Odetta Hartman.

Watch a video for Aphex Twin’s new track, “T69 Collapse”

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Following a typically cryptic poster campaign, it has now been revealed that Aphex Twin’s new Collapse EP will be released by Warp on September 14.

Watch a video for the lead track, “T69 Collapse” below:

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The accompanying press release is equally obscure / obscured, but it suggests that other tracks may be called “T69 Interruption”, “Abundancel 0 edit” and “Pthex”. It also gives the EP a “Frolic rating” of 23.

The September 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Rod Stewart on the cover. Elsewhere in the issue, you’ll find exclusive features on Pixies, The Byrds, Jess Williamson, Liverpool’s post-punk scene, Sly Stone, Gruff Rhys, White Denim, Beth Orton, Mary Lattimore and many more. Our free CD showcases 15 tracks of this month’s best new music, including Oh Sees, Cowboy Junkies, Elephant Micah, Papa M and Odetta Hartman.

Hear a track from John Hiatt’s new album, The Eclipse Sessions

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John Hiatt has announced that his new album, The Eclipse Sessions, will be released via New West Records on October 12.

It was produced by Kevin McKendree and features Hiatt’s longtime drummer Kenneth Blevins and bassist Patrick O’Hearn, as well as Yates McKendree (Kevin’s 17-year old son, who also engineered).

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home – with no delivery charge!

Hear a track from the album, “Cry To Me”, below:

Regarding the title, Hiatt and his band were in the studio on August 21, 2017 when a solar eclipse travelled the length of the continental US. “I think we recorded three songs that day, and then we took a break to go outside and watch everything happen,” Hiatt says. “It seemed everything stopped for a minute or two. It was like a magical little bit of time, a harmonic convergence or something. Like everybody was on the same page.”

You can check out the tracklisting for The Eclipse Sessions below and pre-order the album here.

1. Cry To Me
2. All The Way To The River
3. Aces Up Your Sleeve
4. Poor Imitation Of God
5. Nothing In My Heart
6. Over The Hill
7. Outrunning My Soul
8. Hide Your Tears
9. The Odds Of Loving You
10. One Stiff Breeze
11. Robber’s Highway

The September 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Rod Stewart on the cover. Elsewhere in the issue, you’ll find exclusive features on Pixies, The Byrds, Jess Williamson, Liverpool’s post-punk scene, Sly Stone, Gruff Rhys, White Denim, Beth Orton, Mary Lattimore and many more. Our free CD showcases 15 tracks of this month’s best new music, including Oh Sees, Cowboy Junkies, Elephant Micah, Papa M and Odetta Hartman.

Judee Sill – Songs Of Rapture And Redemption

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Taking a five-second break to eat a strawberry while playing a support slot to Crosby & Nash at the Boston Music Hall in October 1971, Judee Sill tells her audience, “I used to be the church organist in a reform school.” There is a smattering of disbelieving laughter. 
“I did, I swear.”

In her brief period as the golden girl of David Geffen’s newly founded Asylum label, Sill took a certain cool delight in sharing her past misfortunes. She certainly had plenty to go around. One tragedy or another had wiped out her immediate family, she was on the brink of a second divorce, and had also been an armed robber’s accomplice, a heroin addict and an occasional prostitute before being sent to prison for forgery. In person, she had a desire to shock; in music, the ability to awe.

Songs Of Rapture And Redemption features live tracks, demos and outtakes originally available on the first generation of CD reissues of her two LPs. The songs on Judee Sill (1971) and Heart Food (1973) warped the holy terror’s miserable experiences into things of rapturous beauty, and even in their unfinished form they are ruggedly perfect. When Sill’s voice wobbles slightly in a solo demo of “The Kiss” – one of her many jaw-dropping songs of spiritual yearning – it’s a jarring deviation from the gospel, Christ dropping his fork at the Last Supper.

Not a confessional songwriter by any stretch of the imagination, Sill’s stock-in-trade was a kind of astrally projected Americana, full of death-defying melodies and spiralling chord changes; music by Brian Wilson, lyrics by Kahlil Gibran. She would assert – perhaps with a certain sneery twinkle – that her two greatest influences were Bach and Pythagoras, and was sufficiently proud of her classically literate horn arrangements to sing them while on stage in Boston.

However, if the mood is rhapsodic, the delivery is always mathematically precise. Few this side of Karen Carpenter could deliver startling lines with such chilling restraint. Sill’s most famous song, “Jesus Was A Crossmaker”, is full of awkward melodic twists, but on the demo and live versions here, there are no unplaned edges, no wandering notes and no emotional signposting. Moreover, these stunningly intricate pieces seemingly came fully formed; “The Donor”, a huge, multi-layered fandango in its final Heart Food incarnation, is perfectly mapped out in miniature on the demo, Sill slathering on her own geometrically perfect harmonies. There is no room for improvement.

In a loose-slung era, such precision 
may have done Sill no favours. Her 
esoteric beliefs may also have been a 
little too far out for most. At the Boston concert, she introduces the Charlie Brown-jazz of “Enchanted Sky Machines” baldly as “a religious song about flying saucers coming at the end of the world to take all of the deserving people away until the holocaust is over”.

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Meanwhile, Sill’s Jesus (alluded to frequently, and given a close-up in Heart Food outtake “The Vigilante”) swaggers the Earth righting wrongs like a sexy Western hero. Sill was baptised (by crooner Pat Boone, according to friends), but her spiritual path was an idiosyncratic one; as she sings on the skeletal version of “There’s A Rugged Road” that closes this set, “blindly faithful but following none”.

If her songs were a little obtuse, her contemporaries recognised their quality. In 1969, The Turtles recorded her undulating “Lady-O” – delivered succinctly by Sill in the live section of Songs Of Rapture And Redemption – and didn’t change a note. Singer-songwriter JD Souther, who had an unhappy romantic dalliance with Sill, later said, “I thought Jackson Browne was the furthest along 
at having learned songwriting, but then 
I met Judee and thought, ‘Fuck, man, she’s school for all of us.’”

Kudos, however, was Sill’s only tangible reward. Unremarkable record sales – and some ill-considered comments about label boss David Geffen – spelled the end of her Asylum deal, and a car accident sparked a marked decline in already poor fortunes (Sill told friends that Danny Kaye rear-ended her, and John Wayne then took her to hospital). Suffering severe back pain when she recorded demos in 1974 for a third LP (released in 2005 as Dreams Come True), botched corrective operations would send Sill back to serious drug use. She overdosed alone in her North Hollywood home in November 1979.

“She went through a lot of pain and I think you get that in her music, from the accidents and just her earlier lifestyle, but she was able to get over that and overcome that,” says former accomplice Tommy Peltier in a sleevenote to Songs Of Rapture And Redemption. Sill’s songs acknowledge her suffering, but demand no sympathy; bad things happen, but better things are to come. These unvarnished versions highlight the phenomenal craftsmanship that underpins her reputation, and how – in art if not in life – she conquered all. Unbelievable, but true. Extras: None.

The September 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Rod Stewart on the cover. Elsewhere in the issue, you’ll find exclusive features on Pixies, The Byrds, Jess Williamson, Liverpool’s post-punk scene, Sly Stone, Gruff Rhys, White Denim, Beth Orton, Mary Lattimore and many more. Our free CD showcases 15 tracks of this month’s best new music, including Oh Sees, Cowboy Junkies, Elephant Micah, Papa M and Odetta Hartman.