Bobbie Gentry – The Girl From Chickasaw County

0

If there’s one question more perplexing than why Billie Joe McAllister jumped off the Tallahatchie Bridge in “Ode To Billie Joe”, it’s what happened 
to Bobbie Gentry. Some 14 
years after her enigmatic hit topped the charts during 1967’s Summer Of Love, Gentry appeared on American TV singing “Mama, A Rainbow” in a 1981 Mother’s Day special. It was her final performance, after which she disappeared from public view as effectively as if she had entered a nunnery.

Sporadic reports suggested that she was living unobtrusively in Los Angeles, although in 2016 the Washington Post claimed she was residing in a gated community in Memphis, a two-hour drive from the Mississippi locations in her celebrated composition.

Even those to whom she was once close don’t know for sure. “I’ve tried every way in the world to get in touch with her, but she won’t accept calls,” her one-time producer Rick Hall reported shortly before his death in 2018. Glen Campbell, her erstwhile singing partner who died in 2017, was also out of contact for years. “We have no idea where she is,” his management told an enquiring journalist. “If you find her, please get her to call us.”

Why she went into seclusion remains a mystery, and Hall’s explanation that her career left her with “a lot of bad memories of the music business” perhaps tells only part of the story.

Her entire recording history lasted just four years, between 1967–71. After that, she spent much of the 1970s on stage in Las Vegas, where a highlight of her show was apparently a gender-bending tribute to Elvis Presley, performed in a glittering, skin-tight pantsuit.

Then she abandoned that too, leaving an impressive legacy – which could surely have been so much greater – now presented for the first time in a comprehensive boxset, comprising remastered versions of her seven studio albums for Capitol, supplemented by a cornucopia of deep cuts, including outtakes, demos, rarities and an eighth disc of live performances taken from her late-1960s BBC television series.

What emerges is a revelation – at least to those who had pegged her as a straight-up country singer all these years. Gentry was actually no more country than, say Tony Joe White, whom she rivals as a Southern gothic storyteller, or Shelby Lynne, who sometimes sounds like a 
modern-day Gentry clone.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

Gentry’s debut album, Ode To Billie Joe – which ended Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’s 15-week reign at the top of the US charts – is a neglected masterpiece that spans country, folk, soul, pop, jazz and swamp rock. The opener, “Mississippi Delta” – originally the A-side to “Ode To Billie Joe” – choogles like Creedence Clearwater Revival rolling on the river. “Billie Joe” itself hardly needs further comment, except to note that Dylan, holed up in Woodstock with The Band, was so struck by Gentry’s ability to compress the plot of what could have been a novel into a four-minute song that he wrote “Clothes Line Saga” (subtitled “Answer To Ode”) as a riposte.

The album offers further rich vignettes of Southern living on “Chickasaw County Child” and “Lazy Willie”, while her sensual vocal on “Niki Hoeky” is even more erotic than Aretha Franklin’s version on Lady Soul. She followed with 1968’s The Delta Sweete, a dozen songs conceived as a concept about Mississippi life, combining original compositions with covers of “Tobacco Road”, “Big Boss Man” and “Parchman Farm”. The result is an Americana classic.

Under commercial pressure from her record company, Local Gentry, her third album in just 12 months, mixes more Delta myth-making with too many Beatles covers and overly lush arrangements. The suits at Capitol then pushed her into an easy-listening duets album with Glen Campbell that does no justice to her talents at all.

Touch ’Em With Love (1969) again suffers from too many covers, although, as you may imagine, she sings the hell out of “Son Of A Preacher Man”. Fancy (1970) sits firmly in saccharine Bacharach territory, with the rather fine pop-soul of the title track her only writing credit.

Saving the best until last, Patchwork, her 1971 swansong, finds her seizing back control from the label, and is another masterpiece. With the singer writing all 12 of its songs, which are interspersed with instrumental interludes, the influence of Carole King – whose classic set Tapestry had just been released – is evident from the title to the barefooted aesthetic and the troubadour-styled arrangements. At the same time, Gentry’s earthy storytelling ensures this is a tapestry woven not in the Californian canyons, but stitched with the grittier threads of the Deep South. It’s brilliance leaves you lamenting what she might have gone on to achieve if she hadn’t abandoned songwriting and the studio and headed for Vegas.

The previously unreleased material offers further fascinating insights, from the intimate beauty of some of the acoustic demos, to an exquisite cover of “God Bless The Child” from an abandoned acoustic jazz album and – perhaps best of all – “Love Took My Heart And Mashed That Sucker Flat”, a little-known duet with Kelly Gordon that ranks alongside Lee Hazlewood and Nancy Sinatra at their deliciously louche best.

Previously unheard originals such as “I Didn’t Know” and “Joanne” are testament to her storytelling abilities as a songwriter, while the 
live material shows why she became such a hit 
on stage in Vegas, equally capable of belting out 
a soulful “If You Gotta Make A Fool Of Somebody” 
or delivering a pin-dropping “Ode To Billie Joe”, the song that in many ways started it all.

The November 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with David Bowie on the cover. The issue also comes with two exclusive Bowie art prints, including one previously unseen image. We pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, while elsewhere in the issue you’ll find exclusive features on John Lennon, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, Cat Power, John Grant, Blondie, Connan Mockasin, Billy Gibbons, Family, Stereolab and many more. Our free 15-track CD has been exclusively curated by Sub Pop and includes tracks by J Mascis, The Afghan Whigs, Mudhoney, Luluc, Low and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

Various Artists – The Trojan Box

0

Celebrating their 50th year in operation as a record label, the release of The Trojan Box offers a germane moment of reflection on the achievements, and the cultural significance, of this most august of reggae labels. There may be imprints that have greater cachet with aficionados of the genre – Wackies, Black Ark, Firehouse, Jammy’s, more recently, reissue houses like Blood & Fire, Basic Replay, Pressure Sounds – but it’d be 
hard to take any reggae collection seriously that didn’t carry its weight in 
the Trojan catalogue.

In many ways the home of reggae in the UK, Trojan’s always had an understated yet central presence in the popular music landscape – digging into The Trojan Box, it’s sometimes surprising to realise just how many of reggae’s key tracks were released by the label. But Trojan’s beginnings, under nascent independent, Island Records, to make available the productions of Duke Reid, aren’t particularly auspicious. Indeed, from the box’s accompanying essay, written by reggae historian Laurence Cane-Honeysett, you get the sense of a label often at the whims of industry sentiment and business practices, and particularly sensitive to popular culture’s relationship with reggae.

One of the revelations of The Trojan Box is the reminder of reggae’s extended presence in the charts, that it was a fundamental part of pop music for several decades. These days, reggae’s presence in pop music is dispersed across the field – you can hear echoes of reggae and dub in pop’s production, its understanding of audio-space, and in the narrative line drawn from emceeing and toasting through rap and hip-hop. But reggae was big pop business across the ’60s and ’70s, with Trojan at the forefront, scoring an early No 1 with Dave & Ansell Collins’ 1970 hit “Double Barrel”, also sending Desmond Dekker, Bob & Marcia, Jimmy Cliff, and countless others into the higher echelons of the British charts.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

It’s no surprise, then, that Trojan should top-load The Trojan Box with their hits. The box in its entirety is an imposing thing: four LPs, two 7in singles, and two triple-CD sets, the latter including 69 songs landing on the format for the first time. Start with the LPs – two volumes of Trojan Hits, Dancing Time, and Reggae Goes Pop! – and you have a near-peerless summary of Trojan’s significance to pop. Trojan Hits Vol 1 starts with their first chart hit, Tony Tribe’s “Red Red Wine”, veers sideways with The Upsetters’ deadly “Return Of Django”, and lands soon after with Symarip’s “Skinhead Moonstomp”: in these first three songs, you’ve got the landscape of reggae in its most populist, accessible forms.

From there, the set’s an index of many of reggae’s possibilities – Bob & Marcia’s “To Be Young, Gifted & Black” is an early gem, and a cogent reminder of the activist identity that was core to reggae; Nicky Thomas’ “Love Of The Common People” features a great voice that never really got its due, with Thomas as one of reggae’s more intimate, eloquent presences. Later, Ken Boothe’s “Everything I Own” is a welcome reminder of the rich, heartbreaking timbre of someone 
who’d have good claim to be reggae’s finest vocalist.

Things get heavier on the Trojan Mix triple-CD sets. There’s a particularly thrilling run of music on the first set, kicked off by Sugar Minnott’s luscious “Ghetto-Ology”, that explores the wilder terrain of reggae and dub – spatially wrecked, melancholy yet fierce, socially conscious, songs like Tristan Palma’s “How Can A Man Be Happy” are devastating in their simplicity, their directness; early digi-dub experiments, like The Ethiopians’ “Pirate”, its simple Casio rhythm gifting the song’s chant a fragile, DIY backbone, push the music in other directions. Trojan clearly understood that reggae, at its greatest, nestled melody and experimentation 
next to each other.

The whole thing closes with a few personal gems – Susan Cadogan’s “Hurts So Good”, Ken Boothe’s “Sad And Lonely”, and Louisa Mark’s “Keep It Like It Is” – each song a different take on the yearning that is, for many, at the core of reggae. It’s a beautiful, and oddly understated, way to cap off a set that captures just how Trojan has helped direct the cultural conversation around reggae for decades, all while releasing some of the genre’s finest songs.

Extras: 8/10. Alongside the music, The Trojan Box comes with a 116-page book, Trojan: Art Of The Album, that focuses on cover art over the label’s 50 years, with annotations, and a brief introductory essay. It’s an odd assortment of cover art, mapped out chronologically, that reinforces one thing very clearly: the label’s design decisions in the digital age aren’t a patch on their LP cover art, which could be profound, corny, gorgeous and unexpectedly moving, all at once. 
The box also comes with a slipmat, A2 poster, patch and 
7in adapter.

The November 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with David Bowie on the cover. The issue also comes with two exclusive Bowie art prints, including one previously unseen image. We pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, while elsewhere in the issue you’ll find exclusive features on John Lennon, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, Cat Power, John Grant, Blondie, Connan Mockasin, Billy Gibbons, Family, Stereolab and many more. Our free 15-track CD has been exclusively curated by Sub Pop and includes tracks by J Mascis, The Afghan Whigs, Mudhoney, Luluc, Low and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

Nick Mason’s Saucerful Of Secrets announce more dates

0

Nick Mason’s Saucerful Of Secrets – the band formed to play Pink Floyd’s early material – have announced five more UK shows for spring 2018.

Currently on a sold-out tour of the UK, Saucerful Of Secrets will return next year for more dates in Cardiff, Aylesbury, Cambridge and London.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

The full tourdates are as follows:

Monday 29 April – Cardiff, St David’s Hall
Tuesday 30 April – Aylesbury, Friars
Wednesday 1 May – Cambridge, Corn Exchange
Friday 3 May – London, Roundhouse
Saturday 4 May – London, Roundhouse

Tickets go on sale at 10am on Friday 28 September from here and here.

Nick Mason’s Twitter account adds the message: “Our friends in North America, keep an eye out for an interesting announcement soon…”

The November 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with David Bowie on the cover. The issue also comes with two exclusive Bowie art prints, including one previously unseen image. We pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, while elsewhere in the issue you’ll find exclusive features on John Lennon, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, Cat Power, John Grant, Blondie, Connan Mockasin, Billy Gibbons, Family, Stereolab and many more. Our free 15-track CD has been exclusively curated by Sub Pop and includes tracks by J Mascis, The Afghan Whigs, Mudhoney, Luluc, Low and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

Nick Mulvey to curate Cambridge Folk Festival 2019

0

Nick Mulvey has been announced as the guest curator of next year’s Cambridge Folk Festival, taking place in the grounds of Cherry Hinton Hall on August 1-4, 2019.

He’ll select five of his favourite artists to play the festival, as well as taking to the main stage for his own performance.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

Said Mulvey: “As a Cambridge boy born and bred I’m honoured to be the guest curator of next year’s Folk Festival and I’m excited to bring a flavour of the music I love into the mix.”

Mulvey follows 2018’s curator Rhiannon Giddens who performed three times herself and took part in debates and Q&As.

Tickets for the 2019 Cambridge Folk Festival are available via the official site from October 1.

The November 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with David Bowie on the cover. The issue also comes with two exclusive Bowie art prints, including one previously unseen image. We pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, while elsewhere in the issue you’ll find exclusive features on John Lennon, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, Cat Power, John Grant, Blondie, Connan Mockasin, Billy Gibbons, Family, Stereolab and many more. Our free 15-track CD has been exclusively curated by Sub Pop and includes tracks by J Mascis, The Afghan Whigs, Mudhoney, Luluc, Low and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

Watch a video for Jeff Tweedy’s new single “Some Birds”

0

Jeff Tweedy has announced that his new solo album Warm will be released via dBpm records on November 30.

Watch a video for the lead single “Some Birds” below:

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

Warm was produced and recorded entirely by Tweedy at Chicago’s The Loft studio, with help from some of his usual collaborators – Spencer Tweedy, Glenn Kotche and Tom Schick.

He describes the song “Some Birds” as “like a lot of songs on Warm, being a confrontation between self and shadow self simultaneously feeling I’m to blame and not to blame, present and gone, and utterly confused, but determined to hold someone accountable.”

The November 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with David Bowie on the cover. The issue also comes with two exclusive Bowie art prints, including one previously unseen image. We pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, while elsewhere in the issue you’ll find exclusive features on John Lennon, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, Cat Power, John Grant, Blondie, Connan Mockasin, Billy Gibbons, Family, Stereolab and many more. Our free 15-track CD has been exclusively curated by Sub Pop and includes tracks by J Mascis, The Afghan Whigs, Mudhoney, Luluc, Low and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

The Beatles’ White Album anniversary editions unveiled

0

To mark its 50th anniversary, The Beatles’ The Beatles (‘White Album’) will be reissued in a variety of new packages on November 9.

The album’s 30 tracks have been newly mixed by producer Giles Martin and mix engineer Sam Okell in stereo and 5.1 surround audio, joined by 27 early acoustic demos and 50 session takes, most of which are previously unreleased in any form.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

“In remixing ‘White Album’ we’ve tried to bring you as close as possible to The Beatles in the studio,” explains Giles Martin in his written introduction for the new edition. “We’ve peeled back the layers of the ‘Glass Onion’ with the hope of immersing old and new listeners into one of the most diverse and inspiring albums ever made.”

New versions of The Beatles (‘White Album’) include the individually numbered Super Deluxe version (6xCD + Blu-Ray), Deluxe (3xCD / 4xLP) and Standard Vinyl (2xLP).

Pre-order them here and check out the tracklistings below:

Super Deluxe

CD 1: The BEATLES (‘White Album’) 2018 Stereo Mix
Back in the U.S.S.R.
Dear Prudence
Glass Onion
Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da
Wild Honey Pie
The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill
While My Guitar Gently Weeps
Happiness is a Warm Gun
Martha My Dear
I’m so tired
Blackbird
Piggies
Rocky Raccoon
Don’t Pass Me By
Why don’t we do it in the road?
I Will
Julia

CD 2: The BEATLES (‘White Album’) 2018 Stereo Mix
Birthday
Yer Blues
Mother Nature’s Son
Everybody’s Got Something to Hide
Except Me and My Monkey
Sexy Sadie
Helter Skelter
Long, Long, Long
Revolution I
Honey Pie
Savoy Truffle
Cry Baby Cry
Revolution 9
Good Night

CD 3: Esher Demos
Back in the U.S.S.R.
Dear Prudence
Glass Onion
Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da
The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill
While My Guitar Gently Weeps
Happiness is a Warm Gun
I’m so tired
Blackbird
Piggies
Rocky Raccoon
Julia
Yer Blues
Mother Nature’s Son
Everybody’s Got Something to Hide
Except Me and My Monkey
Sexy Sadie
Revolution
Honey Pie
Cry Baby Cry
Sour Milk Sea
Junk
Child of Nature
Circles
Mean Mr. Mustard
Polythene Pam
Not Guilty
What’s the New Mary Jane

CD 4: Sessions
Revolution I (Take 18)
A Beginning (Take 4) / Don’t Pass Me By (Take 7)
Blackbird (Take 28)
Everybody’s Got Something to Hide
Except Me and My Monkey (Unnumbered rehearsal)
Good Night (Unnumbered rehearsal)
Good Night (Take 10 with a guitar part from Take 5)
Good Night (Take 22)
Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da (Take 3)
Revolution (Unnumbered rehearsal)
Revolution (Take 14 – Instrumental backing track)
Cry Baby Cry (Unnumbered rehearsal)
Helter Skelter (First version – Take 2)

CD 5: Sessions
Sexy Sadie (Take 3)
While My Guitar Gently Weeps (Acoustic version – Take 2)
Hey Jude (Take 1)
St. Louis Blues (Studio jam)
Not Guilty (Take 102)
Mother Nature’s Son (Take 15)
Yer Blues (Take 5 with guide vocal)
What’s the New Mary Jane (Take 1)
Rocky Raccoon (Take 8)
Back in the U.S.S.R. (Take 5 – Instrumental backing track)
Dear Prudence (Vocal, guitar & drums)
Let It Be (Unnumbered rehearsal)
While My Guitar Gently Weeps (Third version – Take 27)
(You’re so Square) Baby, I Don’t Care (Studio jam)
Helter Skelter (Second version – Take 17)
Glass Onion (Take 10)

CD 6: Sessions
I Will (Take 13)
Blue Moon (Studio jam)
I Will (Take 29)
Step Inside Love (Studio jam)
Los Paranoias (Studio jam)
Can You Take Me Back? (Take 1)
Birthday (Take 2 – Instrumental backing track)
Piggies (Take 12 – Instrumental backing track)
Happiness is a Warm Gun (Take 19)
Honey Pie (Instrumental backing track)
Savoy Truffle (Instrumental backing track)
Martha My Dear (Without brass and strings)
Long, Long, Long (Take 44)
I’m so tired (Take 7)
I’m so tired (Take 14)
The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill (Take 2)
Why don’t we do it in the road? (Take 5)
Julia (Two rehearsals)
The Inner Light (Take 6 – Instrumental backing track)
Lady Madonna (Take 2 – Piano and drums)
Lady Madonna (Backing vocals from take 3)
Across the Universe (Take 6)

Blu-ray: The BEATLES (‘White Album’)
Audio Features:
: PCM Stereo (2018 Stereo Mix)
: DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 (2018)
: Dolby True HD 5.1 (2018)
: Mono (2018 Direct Transfer of ‘The White Album’ Original Mono Mix)

Deluxe

The BEATLES (‘White Album’) 2018 Stereo Mix

Esher Demos

Standard Vinyl

The BEATLES (‘White Album’) 2018 Stereo Mix

The November 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with David Bowie on the cover. The issue also comes with two exclusive Bowie art prints, including one previously unseen image. We pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, while elsewhere in the issue you’ll find exclusive features on John Lennon, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, Cat Power, John Grant, Blondie, Connan Mockasin, Billy Gibbons, Family, Stereolab and many more. Our free 15-track CD has been exclusively curated by Sub Pop and includes tracks by J Mascis, The Afghan Whigs, Mudhoney, Luluc, Low and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

Hear two new Rosanne Cash songs

0

Rosanne Cash will release her new album She Remembers Everything on Blue Note on November 2.

Hear two tracks from it, “She Remembers Everything” and “Everyone But Me”, below:

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

“There is a woman’s real life, complex experiences and layered understanding in these songs,” says Cash. “I could not have written them 10 years ago – not even close. Time is shorter, I have more to say.”

Check out the tracklisting for She Remembers Everything below and pre-order the album here:

1. The Only Thing Worth Fighting For
2. The Undiscovered Country
3. 8 Gods of Harlem
4. Rabbit Hole
5. Crossing To Jerusalem
6. Not Many Miles To Go
7. Everyone But Me
8. She Remembers Everything
9. Particle And Wave
10. My Least Favorite Life

The November 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with David Bowie on the cover. The issue also comes with two exclusive Bowie art prints, including one previously unseen image. We pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, while elsewhere in the issue you’ll find exclusive features on John Lennon, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, Cat Power, John Grant, Blondie, Connan Mockasin, Billy Gibbons, Family, Stereolab and many more. Our free 15-track CD has been exclusively curated by Sub Pop and includes tracks by J Mascis, The Afghan Whigs, Mudhoney, Luluc, Low and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

Big Brother & The Holding Company’s Cheap Thrills restored for 50th anniversary

0

To mark its 50th anniversary, Big Brother & The Holding Company’s 1968 album Cheap Thrills will be reissued on November 30 in the way the band originally intended.

The band’s original name for the album – Sex, Dope & Cheap Thrills – has been restored, along with alternative takes of songs, 25 of which are previously unreleased.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

Peruse the tracklising for the 2xLP and 2xCD editions of Sex, Dope & Cheap Thrills below, and pre-order the album here.

CD
Disc One

1. Combination Of The Two (Take 3)
2. I Need A Man To Love (Take 4)
3. Summertime (Take 2) *
4. Piece Of My Heart (Take 6)
5. Harry (Take 10)
6. Turtle Blues (Take 4)
7. Oh, Sweet Mary
8. Ball And Chain (live, The Winterland Ballroom, April 12, 1968)
9. Roadblock (Take 1) *
10. Catch Me Daddy (Take 1)
11. It’s A Deal (Take 1) *
12. Easy Once You Know How (Take 1) *
13. How Many Times Blues Jam
14. Farewell Song (Take 7)

Disc Two
1. Flower In The Sun (Take 3)
2. Oh Sweet Mary
3. Summertime (Take 1)
4. Piece of My Heart (Take 4)
5. Catch Me Daddy (Take 9)
6. Catch Me Daddy (Take 10)
7. I Need A Man To Love (Take 3)
8. Harry (Take 9)
9. Farewell Song (Take 4)
10. Misery’n (Takes 2 & 3)
11. Misery’n (Take 4)
12. Magic Of Love (Take 1) *
13. Turtle Blues (Take 9)
14. Turtle Blues (last verse Takes 1-3)
15. Piece Of My Heart (Take 3)
16. Farewell Song (Take 5)

LP 1
Side A

1. Combination of The Two (Demo)
2. I Need A Man To Love (Take 3)
3. Summertime (Take 2) *
4. Piece Of My Heart (Take 6)
Side B
1. Harry (Take 10)
2. Turtle Blues (Take 4)
3. Oh, Sweet Mary
4. Ball And Chain (live, The Winterland Ballroom, April 12, 1968)

LP 2
Side C

1. Roadblock (Take 1) *
2. Magic Of Love (Take 1) *
3. Oh Sweet Mary
4. Flower In The Sun (Take 3)
Side D
1. Catch Me Daddy (Take 1)
2. Turtle Blues (Take 9)
3. How Many Times Blues Jam
4. Farewell Song (Take 5)

All tracks previously unreleased except*

The November 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with David Bowie on the cover. The issue also comes with two exclusive Bowie art prints, including one previously unseen image. We pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, while elsewhere in the issue you’ll find exclusive features on John Lennon, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, Cat Power, John Grant, Blondie, Connan Mockasin, Billy Gibbons, Family, Stereolab and many more. Our free 15-track CD has been exclusively curated by Sub Pop and includes tracks by J Mascis, The Afghan Whigs, Mudhoney, Luluc, Low and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

Tributes paid to Chas & Dave’s Chas Hodges

0

Musicians have been paying tribute to Chas & Dave’s Chas Hodges, who died on Saturday (September 22) after a battle with oesophageal cancer.

Speaking to BBC News, bandmate Dave Peacock hailed Hodges as a “fabulous musician and a fabulous mate. All he wanted to do was play music. He just couldn’t stop, even when he was eating his dinner he’d be humming a tune.

“When he was having chemotherapy they couldn’t believe it – he even wrote a song while he was having chemotherapy in the hospital. I always say to people Chas and Dave ain’t just a band, it’s a way of life and I’m going to miss him terribly,” he added.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

Before forming Chas & Dave in the mid-70s, Hodges was a session bass player who recorded with Joe Meek and backed Jerry Lee Lewis, Gene Vincent and many others. He was also a member of country rockers Heads, Hands & Feet.

Neil Innes of the Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band and The Rutles called him a “Premier Division musician and human being”. Luke Haines wrote: “What a musician, one of my favourite voices.” The Kinks’ Dave Davies tweeted simply: “Sad day, I love Chas Hodges”.

The November 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with David Bowie on the cover. The issue also comes with two exclusive Bowie art prints, including one previously unseen image. We pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, while elsewhere in the issue you’ll find exclusive features on John Lennon, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, Cat Power, John Grant, Blondie, Connan Mockasin, Billy Gibbons, Family, Stereolab and many more. Our free 15-track CD has been exclusively curated by Sub Pop and includes tracks by J Mascis, The Afghan Whigs, Mudhoney, Luluc, Low and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

Exclusive! The second coming of David Bowie’s Never Let Me Down

0

The new issue of Uncut – in shops now or available to order online here – presents the untold story of David Bowie’s 1980s, the decade that found him achieving fame and success on an unprecedented scale – but was it worth it?

The feature is hooked to the release of Bowie’s latest career-spanning box set, Loving The Alien (1983-1988), on October 12. Perhaps the most intriguing feature of package is the inclusion of an entirely new recording of Never Let Me Down. Initially released in April 1987, Bowie later dismissed the album as “awful”, regretting his lack of application when it came to the record’s production.

“About a year later, David and I were sitting on deckchairs by Mountain Studio in Switzerland, looking across Lake Geneva,” recalls songwriter/guitarist Reeves Gabrels, with whom Bowie had just begun recording as Tin Machine. “He started telling me, ‘Y’know, I’m proud of the songs on Never Let Me Down, but I wasn’t in the best shape and wasn’t as present as I should’ve been at the sessions.’ He later pointed to a couch in the studio and said, ‘I did most of my work on the record from there, passed out.’ He blamed himself for a lot of it and suggested we try re-recording some of those songs back then. It was a subject that would come up periodically through the years, usually late at night on the tour bus or in the studio.”

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

Under the guidance of engineer/producer Mario McNulty, Gabrels is now part of the band responsible for finally granting Bowie his wish, alongside David Torn (guitar), Sterling Campbell (drums) and Tim Lefebvre (bass). The revamped Never Let Me Down also features string arrangements by Nico Muhly and a guest appearance by Laurie Anderson. Bowie himself set the ball rolling in 2008, when he asked McNulty to re-record and remix “Time Will Crawl”, the album’s second single, for his iSelect compilation. “Oh, to redo the rest of that album,” wrote a wistful Bowie in the liner notes.

“There were three major changes that David was specifically looking for when we redid ‘Time Will Crawl’,” McNulty tells Uncut. “One was replacing the cold, badly programmed drum machines with real acoustic drums. He also wanted to have a very modern string arrangement, in the style of Philip Glass or Steve Reich. And the other thing was to make a new arrangement, getting rid of most of what was there, then taking bits and looping them. He was getting creative with the existing track.”

Tackling “Zeroes” was a particularly poignant moment for Gabrels. “Mario played it to me with bass, drums and just David’s acoustic guitar and vocals on the first day at Electric Lady,” he says. “I was like, ‘Wow! There’s a song here!’ It was obvious that a second acoustic guitar would beef it up a little. One of the things David and I often used to do, from Tin Machine through to Hours [1999], is play double acoustic guitar together. Sometimes he’d play 12-string and I’d play six-string, and vice versa. We’d sit facing each other with our guitars in front of the mics. So I started playing ‘Zeroes’ on acoustic guitar, with my eyes closed while we were recording. In my mind’s eye I saw David sitting across from me. I could see the way he would move his shoulder and even the way he’d cross his legs and bounce the crossed leg while he was playing. He’d look at you, but at the same time get this faraway look in his eye. When I got to the end of the track, I opened my eyes and of course he wasn’t there. I knew at some point during the session that I was going to feel like I was about to cry. I was just glad I was sitting alone in the studio when it happened.”

Read much more about the new version of Never Let Me Down and David Bowie’s 1980s in the new issue of Uncut, in shops now or available to order online here.

The November 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with David Bowie on the cover. The issue also comes with two exclusive Bowie art prints, including one previously unseen image. We pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, while elsewhere in the issue you’ll find exclusive features on John Lennon, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, Cat Power, John Grant, Blondie, Connan Mockasin, Billy Gibbons, Family, Stereolab and many more. Our free 15-track CD has been exclusively curated by Sub Pop and includes tracks by J Mascis, The Afghan Whigs, Mudhoney, Luluc, Low and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

Aretha Franklin: “She became greater than the greats”

0

The new issue of Uncut – in shops now or available to order online here – features an extensive tribute to Aretha Franklin, exploring how the Queen Of Soul empowered America.

Charting the singer’s rise alongside that of the civil rights movement and noting how she delivered rousing inaugurations for presidents Jimmy Carter and Barack Obama, Stephen Deusner writes that few artists in any genre or in any medium were so tied to the conscience of their country as Aretha. She was revered in a way public servants are revered, praised as though she had benevolently held public office – which is perhaps not far from reality. She was proof that the accomplishments of an artist 
could reverberate down through subsequent generations, that pop music can change the world.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

“Part of what made her great,” says Sam Moore, a lifelong friend and one half of the Stax R&B duo Sam & Dave, “was the struggle, the hurt, the pain she endured. She took it all up on the stage with her. Some of us in the industry, we would turn to drugs or alcohol or maybe even suicide, but she took it all up on that stage 
and she became greater than the greats.”

Following her journey from the gospel circuit via her Atlantic breakthrough to her 80s pop reinvention, Uncut remembers a singer who inspired awe at every turn. One of Aretha’s most popular performances came about when Luciano Pavarotti had been booked on the 1998 Grammy Awards show to perform “Nessum Dorma”, an aria from Puccini’s Turandot that had been his signature tune since the early 1970s. At the last minute he fell ill and was unable to perform. Aretha took his place with little notice and even less rehearsal, but 
to say she brought down the house would be an understatement. Her performance was disarming in its power and interpretation, as she dipped dramatically into her lower register, then hit and sustained those high notes.

Sam Moore was in the audience that night and admits he got caught up in the action. “Aretha came on with this big band, and I was like, what? I didn’t know at the time that she had been studying opera. I just thought, ‘What is she doing?’ But then I completely embarrassed myself. When she started singing, I stood up and yelled… I hope she didn’t hear me, but that woman could do anything.”

Read much more about Aretha Franklin in the new issue of Uncut, on sale now with David Bowie on the cover.

The November 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with David Bowie on the cover. The issue also comes with two exclusive Bowie art prints, including one previously unseen image. We pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, while elsewhere in the issue you’ll find exclusive features on John Lennon, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, Cat Power, John Grant, Blondie, Connan Mockasin, Billy Gibbons, Family, Stereolab and many more. Our free 15-track CD has been exclusively curated by Sub Pop and includes tracks by J Mascis, The Afghan Whigs, Mudhoney, Luluc, Low and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

The inside story of Prince’s album, Piano & A Microphone 1983

0

For this week’s archive feature, here’s part of our Prince cover story from August 2018 – this time digging deep into his posthumous album, Piano & A Microphone 1983.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

Announced on what would have been Prince’s sixtieth birthday, Piano & A Microphone 1983 is a unique, intimate portrait of an artist in full flood. Taped in January 1983 at his Kiowa Trail home studio, it’s a remarkable 35-minute window into Prince’s creative process, featuring nine songs performed alone at his Yamaha acoustic piano: some classics, some covers, some in the throes of being written, some unheard until now.

“Can you turn the lights down a little?” he asks engineer Don Batts at the start, before launching into an astonishing seven-song medley, recorded in a single take. On “17 Days”, he pumps out the beat on his piano pedal, before transitioning into a verse and a chorus of an embryonic “Purple Rain” and a beautiful version of Joni Mitchell’s “A Case Of You”.

There’s a full-blooded gospel take on “Mary Don’t You Weep”, a nineteenth-century spiritual which occasionally popped up in his live set, and an early attempt at “Strange Relationship” in which he struggles to negotiate the transition between verse and chorus. The song finally found a home on Sign O’ The Times. After a raw “International Lover” comes “Wednesday”. Written for protégé Jill Jones and briefly in the running for Purple Rain, it’s sung by Prince in an unfamiliar style, unadorned and oddly innocent. The album ends with two unreleased tracks, the funky “Cold Coffee And Cocaine” and “Why The Butterflies”.

Piano & Microphone 1983 is both an invaluable historical artefact, and an outstanding work in its own right. Though at times Prince is clearly feeling his way into these songs, there are no stops and no mistakes. There’s nothing tentative about it. We hear him road-testing arrangements, scatting rhythmic ideas and guitar parts, playing brilliantly fluid piano and flipping through his full repertoire of vocal styles. These working methods were typical, says his engineer, Susan Rogers. “He didn’t demo songs. If he had an idea he would go straight to the piano – sometimes the guitar, but mostly the piano – and record.”

Discovered while tapes were being moved from Paisley Park, Piano & Microphone 1983 is the first in what promises to be a tantalising series of releases from Prince’s infamous Vault. This is where the legacy industry is heading, transitioning from deluxe expanded editions of classic albums, fleshed out with demos, alternate takes and live cuts, towards entire ‘lost’ works conceived as discrete entities. Recent examples include David Bowie’s The Gouster, an early sketch for Young Americans, and Neil Young’s 1976 album Hitchhiker.

Prince’s catalogue is particularly ripe for this kind of exploitation (he even did it himself, famously shelving and then issuing The Black Album). His modus operandi was such that – whether in the studio, at rehearsal, or on stage – he could record everything to a high standard of audio felicity. The Vault is bursting with material, much of it dating from his imperial 80s. Matt Fink says there are “two or three albums worth of Revolution material which really need to be finished or embellished upon. Those are sitting in there, among all the other material that has accumulated over the years.”

Eric Leeds recalls conversations in early 1986, during rehearsals for the Parade tour, concerning a possible Broadway musical. “He had four or five tracks that we recorded that would ostensibly have been for [that] idea,” says Leeds. “To what degree the idea was even fleshed out in his own mind, God only knows, but he had four or five songs we were working on. ‘Maybe next year we’ll put together a stage musical and go to Broadway.’ Why the hell not!”

The post-Revolution era was perhaps even more productive. Among other conceptually unified projects that could potentially see the light of day are the New Year’s Eve 1987/88 session with Miles Davis, and the albums laid aside in favour of Sign O’ The Times: Crystal Ball, Dream Factory and Camille. There’s also a stack of material recorded with the New Power Generation and 3RDEYEGIRL. Prince was dazzlingly productive while he was alive. In death, he’s destined to be even more so.

“I met him in 1977, and he was writing at least two songs a day since then,” says Bobby Z. “Do the math. People ask me what’s in the vault and I give them that equation! Two songs, times 365, times [39]. They’re going to have stuff to put out when you and I are long gone.”

The November 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with David Bowie on the cover. The issue also comes with two exclusive Bowie art prints, including one previously unseen image. We pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, while elsewhere in the issue you’ll find exclusive features on John Lennon, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, Cat Power, John Grant, Blondie, Connan Mockasin, Billy Gibbons, Family, Stereolab and many more. Our free 15-track CD has been exclusively curated by Sub Pop and includes tracks by J Mascis, The Afghan Whigs, Mudhoney, Luluc, Low and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

Paul McCartney – Egypt Station

0

Given the jaunty, shamelessly button-pushing preamble to the release of Paul McCartney’s 17th 
solo studio album – 
a televised magical mystery tour around key Liverpool haunts in the company of James Corden; hometown gigs at the Philharmonic and Cavern; everything short of piloting a yellow submarine across the Mersey – you might have expected the actual record to be awash with ringing Rickenbacker, supercharged beat music and waggle-headed harmonies.

At 76, McCartney is entitled to trade on old glories, but Egypt Station is nothing so obvious. His first album since 2013’s New is produced by hitmaker for hire Greg Kurstin, with a sole contribution from the similarly clubbable Ryan Tedder. Following recent collaborations with Rihanna and Kanye West, the immediate suspicion is that Macca is more concerned with relevance than nostalgia, a theory backed up by the blast of youthful exuberance, even irreverence, of “Come On To You” and “Fuh You”. The former is just the right kind of dumb. Boasting thuggish drums, rattling piano, sitar solos, cool horns and a melody a toddler could master, it goes for the full “Lady Madonna” vibe. The latter is more contrived, a rather grim pitch for the millennial market that isn’t so much edgy as unseemly.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

Such is the tightrope between ‘now’ and ‘then’ traversed by Egypt Station. The pre-match puff pitches the album as a “journey”, framed by two brief, ambient instrumentals. If so, it follows a haphazard itinerary in an attempt to cover all bases. There’s pop Macca, rock Macca, experimental Macca, acoustic Macca, funky Macca – and senior Macca. “Happy With You” might be the first song on which McCartney has truly sounded like the old man he now is. A frugal campfire tune, with echoes of Peter Gabriel’s “Solsbury Hill”, his voice creaks on words that reveal a clenched fist behind the raised thumb. 
“I used to get angry,” he sings. “I sat around all day/I liked to get stoned/I used to get wasted/But these days I don’t.”

Confidante” is even more regretful, a surreal but heartsore tale of busted friendship set to a ragged minor-key folk strum, while the excellent “Do It Now” is a stately valediction (“I’ll be leaving in the morning, watch me go”), bent on seizing the day before the shadows fall. It’s one of the few occasions where McCartney and Kurstin bring out the big guns – cascading drums, orchestra, choir and all.

On these reflective songs, redolent of the long road travelled and the far shorter path ahead, the hard weather in his voice works well. That high, bell-like tone may not ring so sweet these days, but McCartney can still raise a serviceable scream when the mood takes him, as it does on “Who Cares”, a low-slung blues boogie powered by greased-up ZZ Top guitars, and “Caesar Rock”, a rousing semi-acoustic funk-rock curio that finds McCartney apparently auditioning for Spinal Tap vocal duties.

For ballast, there’s a handful of tunes that could have appeared on any McCartney album since Flowers In The Dirt. On the ropey “People Want Peace” – “I know that you’ve heard it before…” – you can only admire his fealty to this particular theme while acknowledging that it has become a creative bone-yard. Opener “I Don’t Know” is better, a solid, mid-tempo piano archetype flooded with late-night anxiety. “Crows at my window, dogs at my door,” he pines over simple, chunky chords, “Where am I going wrong?” “Dominoes” – a favourite pensioners’ pastime, lest we forget – offers an embarrassment of melodic hooks, with a rare sunburst of harmonies and some Revolver-style backwards guitar on the outro. “Hand In Hand” is a wisp-like beauty, pastoral and fragile, with a superb, serpentine melody.

If these are the album’s equivalent of central stations, McCartney ventures further afield on the branch lines. “Back In Brazil” is an eccentric electro bossa nova, surfing a funky clavinet groove and featuring a flute solo that raises the spectre of Ron Burgundy in Anchorman. It comes close to pastiche while foregrounding an experimental spirit that reaches full bloom on “Despite Repeated Warnings”, a seven-minute multi-part suite on which Macca unburdens himself of his thoughts on Brexit (“We have been misled… What can we do to stop this foolish plan going through?”) and Trump (“The captain’s crazy… How can we stop him, grab the keys and lock him up?”) via the extended metaphor of a capering quest to stop a mad skipper running his ship aground. Consciously doffing its hat to “Band On The Run”, “Live And Let Die” and “Happiness Is A Warm Gun”, among others, the music flips from proggy piano plod to chugging rocker, before undertaking further handbrake turns into thrusting orchestral rock and crunchy blues. The last words we hear as the vessel veers towards the rocks is a mocking, “It’s the will of the people!” It’s as inventive as it is endearingly silly. Hidden track “Hunt You Down/Naked/C-Link” evolves from primal rock through warped doo-wop to crying blues in similarly entertaining fashion.

It all adds up to an artist in rude creative health. If none of Egypt Station is quite startling enough to shift preconceptions about the most famous musician on the planet, it’s sufficiently vibrant to justify its existence, and strong enough to ensure that McCartney can sprinkle three or four tracks into the set on his upcoming world tour without setting off any alarms. Despite the distance travelled, at this late stage Beatle Paul is still travelling forward, yet to reach his destination.

The November 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with David Bowie on the cover. The issue also comes with two exclusive Bowie art prints, including one previously unseen image. We pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, while elsewhere in the issue you’ll find exclusive features on John Lennon, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, Cat Power, John Grant, Blondie, Connan Mockasin, Billy Gibbons, Family, Stereolab and many more. Our free 15-track CD has been exclusively curated by Sub Pop and includes tracks by J Mascis, The Afghan Whigs, Mudhoney, Luluc, Low and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

Fleet Foxes announce First Collection 2006 – 2009

0

To mark the 10th anniversary of their self-titled debut album, Fleet Foxes are re-releasing it as part of a lavish early years box set called First Collection 2006 – 2009.

The package also includes the Sun Giant EP on 10” vinyl; the previously only self-released The Fleet Foxes EP on 10”; and B-sides & Rarities on 10”. In addition to its musical offerings, the release will feature a 32-page booklet including flyers, lyrics, and artwork from the period. First Collection 2006 – 2009 will also be released on CD and on all digital platforms.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

Watch a trailer for the release here:

Peruse the tracklisting below and pre-order First Collection 2006 – 2009 here.

Fleet Foxes 12”
Side A
1. Sun It Rises
2. White Winter Hymnal
3. Ragged Wood
4. Tiger Mountain Peasant Song
5. Quiet Houses
6. He Doesn’t Know Why
Side B
1. Heard Them Stirring
2. Your Protector
3. Meadlowlarks
4. Blue Ridge Mountains
5. Oliver James

Sun Giant 10”
Side A
1. Sun Giant
2. Drops in the River
3. English House
Side B
1. Mykonos
2. Innocent Son

The Fleet Foxes EP 10”
Side A
1. She Got Dressed
2. In the Hot Hot Rays
3. Anyone Who’s Anyone
Side B
1. Textbook Love
2. So Long to the Headstrong
3. Icicle Tusk

B-Sides & Rarities 10”
Side A
1. False Knight On The Road
2. Silver Dagger
3. White Lace Regretfully
4. Isles
Side B
1. Ragged Wood (transition basement sketch)
2. He Doesn’t Know Why (basement demo)
3. English House (basement demo)
4. Hot Air (basement sketch)

The November 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with David Bowie on the cover. The issue also comes with two exclusive Bowie art prints, including one previously unseen image. We pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, while elsewhere in the issue you’ll find exclusive features on John Lennon, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, Cat Power, John Grant, Blondie, Connan Mockasin, Billy Gibbons, Family, Stereolab and many more. Our free 15-track CD has been exclusively curated by Sub Pop and includes tracks by J Mascis, The Afghan Whigs, Mudhoney, Luluc, Low and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

Hear Richard Swift’s posthumous album, The Hex

0

When singer-songwriter, producer and musician’s musician Richard Swift died tragically in July at the age of 41, he left behind a completed album – his first solo record since 2009.

According to a press release, The Hex was conceived sometime in 2012, really finding its conceptual footing in 2016, and finalised in the month before his death with plans for its release already in place.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

It includes a song about Swift’s mother (“Wendy”) and his sister (“Sister Song”) whom he lost in back-to-back years, as well “Dirty Jim”, an ironically jaunty and buoyant song about substance abuse; the lies you tell yourself in its grip; and the loved ones you hurt along the way.

The album is released digitally today – hear it below:

A physical release of The Hex follows on December 7 – pre-order it here.

The November 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with David Bowie on the cover. The issue also comes with two exclusive Bowie art prints, including one previously unseen image. We pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, while elsewhere in the issue you’ll find exclusive features on John Lennon, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, Cat Power, John Grant, Blondie, Connan Mockasin, Billy Gibbons, Family, Stereolab and many more. Our free 15-track CD has been exclusively curated by Sub Pop and includes tracks by J Mascis, The Afghan Whigs, Mudhoney, Luluc, Low and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

Read the complete tracklisting for Bob Dylan’s More Blood, More Tracks – The Bootleg Series Vol. 14

0

Bob Dylan’s 1975 album Blood On The Tracks is to provide the focus for the next instalment of his ongoing Bootleg Series.

More Blood, More Tracks – The Bootleg Series Vol. 14 is released by Columbia Records and Legacy Recordings on November 2.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

A single disc / 2LP edition showcases alternate New York versions of all 10 songs from the original album along with an unreleased take of “Up To Me”.

A 6CD Limited Edition Deluxe Set, meanwhile, presents the complete New York City recording sessions and the five existing Minneapolis/Sound 80 recordings in chronological order. You can pre-order the deluxe set by clicking here.

You can hear “If You See Her, So Hello [Take 1]” below.

The deluxe box set includes a hardcover photo book featuring liner notes and a complete reproduction of one of Dylan’s legendary handwritten 57 page notebooks, where you can follow the lyrical development of the songs that would eventually comprise Blood on the Tracks.

Here’s the tracklisting for the 1 CD / 2LP set:

Tangled Up In Blue (19/9/74, Take 3, Remake 3)
Simple Twist Of Fate (16/9/74, Take 1)
Shelter From The Storm (17/9/74, Take 2)
You’re A Big Girl Now (16/9/74, Take 2)
Buckets Of Rain (18/9/74, Take 2, Remake)
If You See Her, Say Hello (16/9/74, Take 1)
Lily, Rosemary And The Jack Of Hearts (16/9/74, Take 2)
Meet Me In The Morning (19/9/74, Take 1, Remake)
Idiot Wind (19/9/74, Take 4, Remake)
You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go (17/9/74, Take 1, Remake)
Up To Me (19/9/74, Take 2, Remake)

Here’s the tracklising for the 6 CD Deluxe Edition

DISC 1
A & R Studios
New York
September 16, 1974

If You See Her, Say Hello (Take 1) – solo
If You See Her, Say Hello (Take 2) – solo – previously released on The Bootleg Series, Vols. 1-3: Rare and Unreleased, 1961-1991
You’re a Big Girl Now (Take 1) – solo
You’re a Big Girl Now (Take 2) – solo
Simple Twist of Fate (Take 1) – solo
Simple Twist of Fate (Take 2) – solo
You’re a Big Girl Now (Take 3) – solo
Up to Me (Rehearsal) – solo
Up to Me (Take 1) – solo
Lily, Rosemary and the Jack of Hearts (Take 1) – solo
Lily, Rosemary and the Jack of Hearts (Take 2) – solo – included on Blood on the Tracks test pressing

Bob Dylan – vocals, guitar, harmonica

DISC 2
A & R Studios
New York
September 16, 1974

Simple Twist of Fate (Take 1A) – with band
Simple Twist of Fate (Take 2A) – with band
Simple Twist of Fate (Take 3A) – with band
Call Letter Blues (Take 1) – with band
Meet Me in the Morning (Take 1) – with band – edited version included on Blood on the Tracks test pressing and previously released on Blood on the Tracks
Call Letter Blues (Take 2) – with band – previously released on The Bootleg Series, Vols. 1-3: Rare and Unreleased, 1961-1991
Idiot Wind (Take 1) – with bass
Idiot Wind (Take 1, Remake) – with bass
Idiot Wind (Take 3 with insert) – with bass
Idiot Wind (Take 5) – with bass
Idiot Wind (Take 6) – with bass
You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go (Rehearsal and Take 1) – with band
You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go (Take 2) – with band
You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go (Take 3) – with band
You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go (Take 4) – with bass
You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go (Take 5) – with band
You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go (Take 6) – with band
You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go (Take 6, Remake) – with band
You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go (Take 7) – with band
You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go (Take 8) – with band

Bob Dylan: vocals, guitar, harmonica
Eric Weissberg, Charles Brown III, Barry Kornfeld: guitars
Thomas McFaul: keyboards
Tony Brown: bass
Richard Crooks: drums
Buddy Cage: steel guitar (5-6)

DISC 3
A & R Studios
New York
September 16, 1974

Tangled Up in Blue (Take 1) – with bass

A & R Studios
New York
September 17, 1974

You’re a Big Girl Now (Take 1, Remake) – with bass and organ
You’re a Big Girl Now (Take 2, Remake) – with bass, organ, and steel guitar –included on Blood on the Tracks test pressing and previously released on Biograph
Tangled Up in Blue (Rehearsal) – with bass and organ
Tangled Up in Blue (Take 2, Remake) – with bass and organ
Spanish is the Loving Tongue (Take 1) – with bass and piano
Call Letter Blues (Rehearsal) – with bass and piano
You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go (Take 1, Remake) – with bass and piano
Shelter From The Storm (Take 1) – with bass and piano – previously released on the Jerry McGuire original soundtrack
Buckets of Rain (Take 1) – with bass
Tangled Up in Blue (Take 3, Remake) – with bass
Buckets of Rain (Take 2) – with bass
Shelter From The Storm (Take 2) – with bass
Shelter From The Storm (Take 3) – with bass
Shelter From The Storm (Take 4) – with bass – previously released on Blood on the Tracks

Bob Dylan: vocals, guitar, harmonica
Tony Brown: bass
Paul Griffin: keyboards (2-9)
Buddy Cage: steel guitar (3)

DISC 4
A & R Studios
New York
September 17, 1974

You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go (Take 1, Remake 2) – with bass
You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go (Take 2, Remake 2) – with bass – previously released on Blood on the Tracks

A & R Studios
New York
September 18, 1974

Buckets of Rain (Take 1, Remake) – solo
Buckets of Rain (Take 2, Remake) – solo
Buckets of Rain (Take 3, Remake) – solo
Buckets of Rain (Take 4, Remake) – solo

A & R Studios
New York
September 19, 1974

Up to Me (Take 1, Remake) – with bass
Up to Me (Take 2, Remake) – with bass
Buckets of Rain (Take 1, Remake 2) – with bass
Buckets of Rain (Take 2, Remake 2) – with bass
Buckets of Rain (Take 3, Remake 2) – with bass
Buckets of Rain (Take 4, Remake 2) – with bass – previously released on Blood on the Tracks
If You See Her, Say Hello (Take 1, Remake) – with bass – previously included on Blood on the Tracks test pressing
Up to Me (Take 1, Remake 2) – with bass
Up to Me (Take 2, Remake 2) – with bass
Up to Me (Take 3, Remake 2) – with bass
Buckets of Rain (Rehearsal) – with bass
Meet Me in the Morning (Take 1, Remake) – with bass – previously released on the “Duquesne Whistle” 7” single
Meet Me in the Morning (Take 2, Remake) – with bass
Buckets of Rain (Take 5, Remake 2) – with bass

Bob Dylan: vocals, guitar, harmonica
Tony Brown: bass (1-2, 7-20)

DISC 5
A & R Studios
New York
September 19, 1974

Tangled Up in Blue (Rehearsal and Take 1, Remake 2) – with bass
Tangled Up in Blue (Take 2, Remake 2) – with bass
Tangled Up in Blue (Take 3, Remake 2) – with bass – included on Blood on the Tracks test pressing and previously released on The Bootleg Series, Vols. 1-3: Rare and Unreleased, 1961-1991
Simple Twist of Fate (Take 2, Remake) – with bass
Simple Twist of Fate (Take 3, Remake) – with bass – previously released on Blood on the Tracks
Up to Me (Rehearsal and Take 1, Remake 3) – with bass
Up to Me (Take 2, Remake 3) – with bass – previously released on Biograph
Idiot Wind (Rehearsal and Takes 1-3, Remake) – with bass
Idiot Wind (Take 4, Remake) – with bass
Idiot Wind (Take 4, Remake) – with organ overdub – included on Blood on the Tracks test pressing and previously released on The Bootleg Series, Vols. 1-3: Rare and Unreleased, 1961-1991
You’re a Big Girl Now (Take 1, Remake 2) – with bass
Meet Me in the Morning (Take 1, Remake 2) – with bass
Meet Me in the Morning (Takes 2-3, Remake 2) – with bass

Bob Dylan: vocals, guitar, harmonica
Tony Brown: bass

DISC 6
A & R Studios
New York
September 19, 1974

You’re a Big Girl Now (Takes 3-6, Remake 2) – with bass
Tangled Up in Blue (Rehearsal and Takes 1-2, Remake 3) – with bass
Tangled Up in Blue (Take 3, Remake 3) – with bass

Sound 80 Studio
Minneapolis, MN
December 27, 1974

Idiot Wind – with band – previously released on Blood on the Tracks
You’re a Big Girl Now – with band – previously released on Blood on the Tracks

Sound 80 Studio
Minneapolis, MN
December 30, 1974

Tangled Up in Blue – with band – previously released on Blood on the Tracks
Lily, Rosemary and the Jack of Hearts – with band – previously released on Blood on the Tracks
If You See Her, Say Hello – with band – previously released on Blood on the Tracks

The November 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with David Bowie on the cover. The issue also comes with two exclusive Bowie art prints, including one previously unseen image. We pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, while elsewhere in the issue you’ll find exclusive features on John Lennon, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, Cat Power, John Grant, Blondie, Connan Mockasin, Billy Gibbons, Family, Stereolab and many more. Our free 15-track CD has been exclusively curated by Sub Pop and includes tracks by J Mascis, The Afghan Whigs, Mudhoney, Luluc, Low and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

Get a free, 15-track Sub Pop CD with this month’s issue of Uncut!

0

The new issue of Uncut – in shops now or available to buy online here – comes with a free CD curated by Sub Pop head honcho Jonathan Poneman.

Celebrating the legendary Seattle label’s 30th anniversary, it features 15 tracks from the cream of Sub Pop’s current roster, including Low, Iron & Wine, Sleater-Kinney, J Mascis, Luluc, The Afghan Whigs and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

“It’s been a busy 30 years but the last year in particular has been really crazy,” says Poneman. “The monolithic Sub Pop sound, the singular grunge thing, has long been built upon, and the roster’s a reflection of the musical interests of all the people at the label.”

Peruse the full CD tracklisting below, and order a copy of the mag here.

1. Rolling Blackouts CF – Sister’s Jeans
2. Loma – Relay Runner
3. Low – Fly
4. Yuno – No Going Back
5. Knife Knights – Give You Game
6. Moaning – Don’t Go
7. King Tuff – Psycho Star
8. Frankie Cosmos – Jesse
9. J Mascis – See You At The Movies
10. Iron & Wine – What Hurts Worse
11. Luluc – Kids
12. The Afghan Whigs – Demon In Profile
13. Mass Gothic – How I Love You
14. Sleater-Kinney – Surface Envy
15. Jo Passed – MDM

The November 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with David Bowie on the cover. The issue also comes with two exclusive Bowie art prints, including one previously unseen image. We pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, while elsewhere in the issue you’ll find exclusive features on John Lennon, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, Cat Power, John Grant, Blondie, Connan Mockasin, Billy Gibbons, Family, Stereolab and many more. Our free 15-track CD has been exclusively curated by Sub Pop and includes tracks by J Mascis, The Afghan Whigs, Mudhoney, Luluc, Low and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

Tom Petty: “He was committed to being great”

0

One year on from his sudden and tragic death at the age of 66, Tom Petty is the subject of a memorial feature in the new issue of Uncut, on sale tomorrow (September 20).

In it, Petty’s Heartbreakers bandmates and lifelong friends Mike Campbell and Benmont Tench pay tribute to their former bandleader and guide us through the highlights from the new Tom Petty anthology An American Treasure.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

“Tom was a great leader in every sense of the word,” says Mike Campbell. “He was definitely in control; we were following his lead every step of the way. Fortunately, he was almost always right! Every band needs somebody like that, with that drive, yet it was also a democracy in lots of ways. He would bring in a new song and 
be very free: ‘Just play what you feel.’ … We believed in him, and he believed in us, too. He believed we could get him there.”

“He was committed to being great. We’d work on stuff sometimes that sounded pretty good, and he’d say, ‘Let’s throw that one out, I can do better.’ He saw through bullshit instantly; he knew what was good and what wasn’t. He knew what was phoney and he knew what was real. He had that in spades. I’d look at him sometimes and think, ‘This guy is on his game. He knows who he is, and he knows how to get it across.’ He was a great songwriter, good rhythm-guitar player, great bass player. Great record maker. He was all those things. Perhaps his defining characteristic as a player was his confidence. Plus, he was really fucking smart.”

Reflecting on Tom Petty the man, Benmont Tench says: “He was a very, very funny guy. He didn’t let that out much, every now and then you’d see some whimsy in a video or a lyric, but he could be an absolute riot… He got real quiet when he was mad. That was some force, too!”

Adds Campbell, “I’m still grieving, I’ll probably be grieving for a long time, but I feel blessed that we had our time, and we wrote a lot of great songs which I think are going to hold up long after I’m gone. Everything is in the songs. The guy who wrote those songs, that’s who Tom is, that’s what he was like. He had a deep love of humanity. He had a deep belief in hope and the power of rock’n’roll, and he was compassionate towards people in pain… I’m very grateful and proud of what we did together.”

Read much more about Tom Petty in the new issue of Uncut, in shops now or available online now by following this link.

The November 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with David Bowie on the cover. The issue also comes with two exclusive Bowie art prints, including one previously unseen image. We pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, while elsewhere in the issue you’ll find exclusive features on John Lennon, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, Cat Power, John Grant, Blondie, Connan Mockasin, Billy Gibbons, Family, Stereolab and many more. Our free 15-track CD has been exclusively curated by Sub Pop and includes tracks by J Mascis, The Afghan Whigs, Mudhoney, Luluc, Low and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

Mark Knopfler announces new solo album

0

Mark Knopfler has announced that his new solo album, Down The Road Wherever, will be released on November 16 on his own British Grove label via Universal/Virgin EMI.

The band features Mark Knopfler on guitars, Jim Cox and Guy Fletcher on keyboards, Nigel Hitchcock on saxophone and Tom Walsh on trumpet, John McCusker on fiddle, Mike McGoldrick on whistle and flute, Glenn Worf on bass, Ian ‘Ianto’ Thomas on drums and Danny Cummings on percussion. Richard Bennett and Robbie McIntosh also feature on guitar and Trevor Mires on trombone. Imelda May, Lance Ellington, Kris Drever, Beverley Skeete and Katie Kissoon add backing vocals.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

All songs are written by Mark Knopfler apart from “Just A Boy Away From Home” where he shares the credits with Rodgers and Hammerstein, as the song uses a piece of “You’ll Never Walk Alone” to spin its tale of a lone Liverpool fan wandering the empty streets of Newcastle after midnight.

Other topics broached on Down The Road Wherever include his early days in Deptford with Dire Straits, the compulsion of a musician hitching home through the snow, and a man out of time in his local greasy spoon.

“You get to an age where you’ve written quite a few songs,” says Knopfler. “But Down The Road Wherever seems to be appropriate for me just because it’s what I’ve always done. I’ve always tried to make a record and also to keep my own geography happening in the songs.”

Down The Road Wherever will be available on digital, CD, double vinyl (with one bonus track), deluxe CD with two bonus tracks, and a box set that will include the album on both vinyl and deluxe CD and an additional 12” vinyl EP with four bonus tracks, a 12” print of the artwork and a 12” guitar tablature of a selected song. The album is available to pre-order here.

The November 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with David Bowie on the cover. The issue also comes with two exclusive Bowie art prints, including one previously unseen image. We pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, while elsewhere in the issue you’ll find exclusive features on John Lennon, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, Cat Power, John Grant, Blondie, Connan Mockasin, Billy Gibbons, Family, Stereolab and many more. Our free 15-track CD has been exclusively curated by Sub Pop and includes tracks by J Mascis, The Afghan Whigs, Mudhoney, Luluc, Low and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

Hear Marianne Faithfull’s new song, featuring Nick Cave

0

Marianne Faithfull will release her 21st album, Negative Capability, on November 2.

Hear the first single, “The Gypsy Faerie Queen” featuring Nick Cave, below:

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

Inspired by Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream, “The Gypsy Faerie Queen” was co-written with Nick Cave and features his vocals and piano playing. “It’s a little miracle,” says Faithfull. “It’s just gorgeous… I think it’s one of the loveliest songs we’ve ever written together. It was so great working with Nick again.”

The song also features Warren Ellis, Ed Harcourt and Rob Ellis, who all make further appearances on Negative Capability.

The November 2018 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with David Bowie on the cover. The issue also comes with two exclusive Bowie art prints, including one previously unseen image. We pay tribute to Aretha Franklin, while elsewhere in the issue you’ll find exclusive features on John Lennon, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, Cat Power, John Grant, Blondie, Connan Mockasin, Billy Gibbons, Family, Stereolab and many more. Our free 15-track CD has been exclusively curated by Sub Pop and includes tracks by J Mascis, The Afghan Whigs, Mudhoney, Luluc, Low and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.