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John Lydon announces new book and spoken word tour

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John Lydon has announced the publication of a new book called I Could Be Wrong, I Could Be Right in Autumn 2020, coinciding with a 54-date UK spoken word tour of the same name.

According to a press release, “Lydon will reflect on the Sex Pistols, Public Image Limited (PiL), his art and his life’s story during informal evenings of conversation and audience questions.”

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Lydon himself adds: “I could be sh*t. I could be sh*te. I’m left-handed.”

Signed limited edition copies of I Could Be Wrong, I Could Be Right will be available at venues – only 5,000 numbered copies will be printed.

Check out the full list of tourdates below. Tickets go on sale on Friday November 1, with a limited number of pre-release tickets for fans available from Monday October 28. VIP meet & greet packages will also be available.

22 September Camberley Theatre
23 September Hertford Theatre
24 September Hastings White Rock Theatre
25 September Clacton-On-Sea West Cliff Theatre
26 September Watford Colosseum
27 September Basingstoke Anvil
29 September Bristol St. George’s
30 September Bournemouth International Centre
1 October Carmarthen – The Lyric
2 October Porthcawl Grand Pavilion
3 October Yeovil Westlands
4 October Exeter Corn Exchange
6 October Lincoln New Theatre Royal
7 October Hull City Hall
8 October Stafford Gatehouse
9 October Leeds City Varieties
10 October Chesterfield Winding Wheel
11 October Loughborough Town Hall
13 October Wrexham William Aston Hall
14 October Shrewsbury Theatre Severn
15 October Birmingham Town Hall
16 October Leicester De Montfort Hall
17 October Cheltenham Pump Room
18 October Crewe Lyceum
20 October Newport Riverfront
21 October Dudley Town Hall
22 October Worthing Pavilion
23 October Dorking Halls
24 October Coventry Warwick Arts Centre
25 October Kingston Rose Theatre
27 October Port Sunlight Gladstone Theatre
28 October Durham Gala Theatre
29 October Yarm Princess Alexandra Auditorium
30 October Lytham St. Annes Lowther Pavilion
31 October Lancaster Grand
1 November Burnley Mechanics
3 November Dundee Rep
4 November Greenock Beacon Arts Centre
5 November Glasgow Pavilion Theatre
6 November Falkirk FTH Theatre
7 November Glenrothes Rothes Hall
8 November Kilmarnock Grand Hall
10 November Bury St. Edmunds – The Apex
11 November Bedford Corn Exchange
12 November Wimborne Tivoli
13 November London Union Chapel
14 November Ipswich Corn Exchange
15 November Crawley – The Hawth
17 November Whitley Bay Playhouse
18 November Bradford St. Georges Hall
19 November Warrington Parr Hall
20 November Northallerton Forum
21 November Scarborough Spa
22 November St. Albans – The Alban Arena

The December 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from October 17, and available to order online now – with Bob Dylan on the cover and an exclusive unreleased Dylan track on our free CD. Elsewhere in the issue, there’s Robert Smith, Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy, Pink Floyd, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, Prince, Joni Mitchell, Bruce Springsteen, Jeff Lynne, Booker T, Tindersticks and much more.

Bob Dylan’s Tarantula to get audiobook release

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Bob Dylan‘s book of lyrics, prose, and poetry Tarantula is set to be released as an audiobook later this year.

Written in 1966, Tarantula received its first official release in 1971.

This audiobook has been narrated by the actor Will Patton and is released by Simon & Schuster on December 3.

Meanwhile, Bobcats can read about the latest instalment in Dylan’s ongoing Bootleg Series in the new issue of Uncut – on sale now and available to buy online.

Our latest cover story focusses on Bob Dylan (Featuring Johnny Cash) Travelin’ Thru, 1967 – 1969: The Bootleg Series Vol. 15 and previously unavailable recordings made with Johnny Cash.

The issue comes with a free CD which includes an exclusive unreleased Dylan track from Travelin’ Thru. You can read more about it by clicking here.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

The December 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from October 17, and available to order online now – with Bob Dylan on the cover and an exclusive unreleased Dylan track on our free CD. Elsewhere in the issue, there’s Robert Smith, Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy, Pink Floyd, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, Prince, Joni Mitchell, Bruce Springsteen, Jeff Lynne, Booker T, Tindersticks and much more.

Watch a video for Beck’s new single, “Uneventful Days”

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Beck’s new album Hyperspace will be released by Capitol on November 22.

Watch a video for the single “Uneventful Days” below – it’s directed by Blood Orange’s Dev Hynes:

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Seven of Hyperspace’s 11 tracks feature co-writing and co-production from Pharrell Williams. Vocal guests on the album include Chris Martin and Sky Ferreira.

Check out the tracklisting below:

1. Hyperlife
2. Uneventful Days
3. Saw Lightning
4. Die Waiting
5. Chemical
6. See Through
7. Hyperspace
8. Stratosphere
9. Dark Places
10. Star
11. Everlasting Nothing

The December 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from October 17, and available to order online now – with Bob Dylan on the cover and an exclusive unreleased Dylan track on our free CD. Elsewhere in the issue, there’s Robert Smith, Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy, Pink Floyd, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, Prince, Joni Mitchell, Bruce Springsteen, Jeff Lynne, Booker T, Tindersticks and much more.

“Ragged inspiration!” Nils Lofgren on Neil Young with Crazy Horse

It hopefully won’t have escaped your notice that there’s a new Neil Young album out this week – his first with Crazy Horse since Psychedelic Pill in 2012. I wrote a pretty in-depth review of the album in our November issue, but here’s also the Q&A I conducted with Nils Lofgren about his return to the Horse. Some interesting nuggets, I think, not least the slightly weird logistics about this new album’s origins…

Follow me on Twitter @MichaelBonner

The new Uncut is in shops from Thursday, October 17 but available to buy now by clicking here

How is it, being back with Crazy Horse?
They’re probably my oldest musical family – Crazy Horse. 50 years ago in May, I walked in on them at the Cellar Door. We made friends. I made the first definitive Crazy Horse album with Danny Whitten, with Jack Nitzsche producing. It was an amazing thing and have had some great chapters ever since. And here we are!

When was the idea of Crazy Horse recording a new album first mooted?
This February, we did two shows in Winnipeg. We had what we called the Polar Vortex – the whole country was being slammed with ice and snow. Ralphie and I went to Billy’s house in South Dakota, really in the middle of nowhere, we rehearsed for a few days without Neil. Neil isn’t a big fan of rehearsal. He knows his songs! Then we got on a crazy, 13-hour bus journey from South Dakota to Winnipeg. All the shows were rocking and fun, but that last show in Winnipeg, to me became more of a band than we’d been. It had a special feel. So that’s when I think Neil started writing. A couple of weeks before I was going to start touring my own record Blue With Lou, Neil called and said, “I’m writing songs. Can I send you a few? I know you’re got your own record and tour, but any chance you come up to Colorado for a couple of weeks and start recording?” That was my first exposure to the idea of a new album. Neil kept sending these primitive demos to my email in batches of twos and threes. He said, “Just get a little familiar with them. Don’t get too inside them. We like things to involve.” It’s like Tonight’s The Night – if you catch people a little off guard without too much preparation you get a more emotional tape.

Tell us about the studio.
It was this mountain top studio that was scrambling to get ready for us. There was a room with oxygen tanks, because of the altitude. Amy, my wife, and I got there three days early to get acclimatised. We jumped into it with all the craziness and technical glitches and got used to playing as live as we could, without all the baffles and everyone in iso-booths. We chipped away and got 11 or 12 songs recorded. At the last minute, we had a listening party at Neil and Daryl’s, which was beautiful. It was a Sunday night. We drove down the mountain – there was snow, ice, hail and rain, terrible roads – to get to Cortez. When we left, we all felt really good about it. Neil was off to Europe to play festival shows with Promise Of The Real; he thought maybe we’d get back together in August and do some more recording. Then, as the weeks went by, he did some serious listening and figured he had a record he felt great about already. We didn’t need to keep going at it.

Reading John Hanlon’s posts on NYA, it seems that Neil was working on a solo album originally. Then it morphed into a Crazy Horse album. Is this your understanding, too?
I was not aware of that. I don’t know if he did some solo recording with John. I know he played a couple of the songs at the shows in Winnipeg – he played a 20-minute set before he brought Crazy Horse out. I remember how “Green is Blue” deeply affected me. I didn’t realise I’d be recording it with Crazy Horse months later!

How did the sessions unfold?
The main goal was to play live and record live but hear each other. We set up in the room, with all the amps bleeding into each other, but with some sense of limiting the bleeding. I’d move my amp back a bit into the room, maybe we’d put a baffle by it but not enclose it. Then it was a question of moving round the drum kit so Neil could hear me and I could hear him. But you don’t want the amps blaring into the vocal mics louder than the vocal either. So it was more a logistical thing. Last time I did a record like that was Tonight’s The Night. Even when we did Trans in the early ’80s, in Hawaii, sometimes we had to use headphones.

How did Neil manage the sessions?
There were a handful of songs where Neil and I would look at each other and he’d say, “Maybe I’ll be on acoustic.” I’d go, “You want me on piano?” We did than on “Think Of Me”. Then there were some other songs where I’d like Neil was getting an acoustic and I’d have a lap steel or an accordion. Or he’d say, “Why don’t we try rough Crazy Horse approach with two electrics?” Some of the songs came out that way, like “Rainbow Of Colors”.

“She Showed Me Love” is a classic Horse jam.
That was one where we got to an arrangement of the song – which we barely knew – and then all followed Neil into this jam. We just didn’t stop! I thought we were just getting used to the groove of the song. But 13 minutes later, there we were. It was a bunch of old friends reconnecting and rediscovering what they’ve always had.

Neil had a pretty rough start to the year, with the fire in Malibu and then losing Pegi. Has this Crazy Horse album been therapeutic?
Oh, sure. I love Pegi, I love Neil, I have such a long history with them. Just such a heartbreaking thing. And all the stuff he’s gone through with his own health, that I just felt that he wanted to play it all – he kept going out and singing and letting the music, which I believe is the planet’s sacred weapon, work through him and help him and his family. For all of us, too – we get older, we all got stuff going on. It was very therapeutic and healing – the ragged inspiration of it, playing with old friends and creating something new. It won’t bring anyone back, but it reminds you their spirits are with you and they want you to carry on.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

Follow me on Twitter @MichaelBonner

The December 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from October 17, and available to order online now – with Bob Dylan on the cover and an exclusive unreleased Dylan track on our free CD. Elsewhere in the issue, there’s Robert Smith, Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy, Pink Floyd, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, Prince, Joni Mitchell, Bruce Springsteen, Jeff Lynne, Booker T, Tindersticks and much more.

Hear PJ Harvey cover Nick Cave’s “Red Right Hand”

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The first ever official Peaky Blinders soundtrack album will be released by UMC on November 15.

Across two LPs or three CDs, it features much of the music employed in the hit series, including songs by Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, Arctic Monkeys, The White Stripes, Royal Blood, The Last Shadow Puppets, Queens of the Stone Age, Black Sabbath, David Bowie, Laura Marling and Foals.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

There are also a handful of tracks recorded exclusively for Peaky Blinders, including Richard Hawley’s cover of Bob Dylan’s “Ballad of A Thin Man”, Jehnny Beth’s “I’m The Man”, Anna Calvi’s series 5 score “You’re Not God” and PJ Harvey’s version of the show’s theme song, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds’ “Red Right Hand”. Listen to that below:

Pre-order the album and check out the full tracklisting here.

The December 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from October 17, and available to order online now – with Bob Dylan on the cover and an exclusive unreleased Dylan track on our free CD. Elsewhere in the issue, there’s Robert Smith, Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy, Pink Floyd, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, Prince, Joni Mitchell, Bruce Springsteen, Jeff Lynne, Booker T, Tindersticks and much more.

Wire announce new album, Mind Hive

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Wire have announced that their new album Mind Hive will be released through their own Pinkflag label on January 24.

The follow-up to 2017’s Silver/Lead features the same line-up of original members Colin Newman, Graham Lewis and Robert ‘Gotobed’ Grey, plus Matthew Simms on guitar.

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Listen to lead single “Cactused” below, accompanied by in-the-studio footage taken from forthcoming Wire documentary People In A Film, due later in 2020.

Pre-order Mind Hive here and check out Wire’s latest tourdates below:

January 27 – Bristol, UK @ The Fleece
January 28 – Manchester, UK @ Band on the Wall
January 29 – Birmingham, UK @ Hare & Hounds
January 30 – Glasgow, UK @ G2 (The Garage)
January 31 – Leeds, UK @ Brudenell Social Club
February 1 – Brighton, UK @ Chalk

March 3 – Minneapolis, MN @ Fine Line
March 4 – Chicago, IL @ Metro
March 6 – Nashville, TN @ Mercy Lounge
March 7 – Atlanta, GA @ Variety Playhouse
March 9 – Washington, DC @ Union Stage
March 10 – Philadelphia, PA @ Underground Arts
March 11 – Brooklyn, NY @ Music Hall of Williamsburg
March 12 – Brooklyn, NY @ Music Hall of Williamsburg
March 13 – Boston, MA @ Sinclair
March 14 – Ottawa, ON @ Bronson Centre
March 16 – Toronto, ON @ Great Hall
May 21 – London, UK @ Islington Assembly Hall

The December 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from October 17, and available to order online now – with Bob Dylan on the cover and an exclusive unreleased Dylan track on our free CD. Elsewhere in the issue, there’s Robert Smith, Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy, Pink Floyd, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, Prince, Joni Mitchell, Bruce Springsteen, Jeff Lynne, Booker T, Tindersticks and much more.

Kacy & Clayton – Carrying On

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If there’s one song on the new album from Kacy Anderson and Clayton Linthicum that speaks to life’s rhythm – something of a preoccupation in folk and country music – it’s “Providence Place”. Employing effortless vocal harmonies and an elegant swing, the cousins paint a tender portrait of an elderly musician hanging up a fiddle on the wall and laying a mandolin in its case, ready for the move into a care home – very likely the same centre in Moose Jaw, south Saskatchewan, where the teenage Kacy & Clayton used to play a regular Sunday evening set. The emotional force of the song lies in its unsentimental acknowledgement that all things must pass, but that there’s real comfort in longstanding friendships and shared pleasures – making music, especially – given extra resonance by being rooted in a specific place.

Anderson and Linthicum cut their teeth on folk, polka and country standards, which explains why their 2011 self-released debut leaned so heavily on the past, with the likes of “Ain’t No Tellin’” and “Henry Lee”. The follow-up was similarly indebted, with just three originals, but 2016’s British-folk-attuned Strange Country flipped that ratio, their fine instrumental teamwork and Anderson’s effortlessly emotive voice marking them as significant new talents. Their breakthrough, though, was The Siren’s Song, a year later. Produced by Jeff Tweedy, it proved that the duo were nether revivalists nor modernists; rather, translators of tradition with an intuitive syntax of their own.

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As the title suggests, Carrying On follows through. Its 10 electro-acoustic songs were written on the road out of necessity, not choice: Kacy & Clayton went straight from a tour of western Canada to recording at Tweedy’s Loft in Chicago, which they did in just four days, mostly live. It’s a warm, beguiling set that tips its hat to roots music interpreters as disparate as Hoyt Axton (Linthicum cites his moody, baroque folk-pop effort, My Griffin Is Gone), Fairport Convention, Dolly Parton, The Byrds and Bobbie Gentry (notably, her Delta Sweete), while also tapping Cajun fiddle music and the work of Ralph Mooney, a celebrated steel guitarist on the Bakersfield country scene. It’s to their credit, though, that there’s no strained lifting. Explaining her own relationship with the past, Anderson tells Uncut: “A favourite folk musician of mine, Shirley Collins, said when she sings she feels past generations standing behind her. It’s a real feeling that speaks louder than the fear of bastardising a song that’s not my mother tongue.”

Kacy & Clayton’s
natural eloquence shines throughout, from airily twanging opener “The Forty-Ninth Parallel” – where, with the same bell-like purity and unforced warble of a young Parton, Anderson chastises herself for marrying for love, rather than money, “like any woman in her right mind would do” – to “That Sweet Orchestra Sound”, a jangling charmer with a gaggle of guitars set to a bar-room swing, that’s dedicated to “the memory of Bud Romanski, Bob McGlynn, Lonnie Harden and the many other pickers from our region”. In between sit the alluringly woody and rhythmic “The South Saskatchewan River”, Linthicum conjuring a singular landscape via mention of hoar frost on aspen and polluting factories, and the deceptively romantic, slo-mo “Mom And Dad’s Waltz #2”, which ponders the fate of a “child passed around for years and years” between his struggling mother, grandmother and a father who works away.

It’s one of the album’s two sober tracks, the other “In A Time Of Doubt”, which suggests Julia Jacklin having a ’70s country moment, its cheerfully fat chunks of 12-string guitar disguising Anderson’s snapshot of a cruelly manipulative relationship. “Intervention”, though, is a brief but joyous counter to that pain, set to a steady canter, her strong, clear voice announcing that thanks to her new love, “the pills I take to keep my mind, I don’t need them anymore”.
That there are no covers on Carrying On (a first) says much: Kacy & Clayton are so in tune with their heritage they no longer need to exercise it explicitly. For them it’s not an obligation to carry the traditional country-folk baton, more a deep pleasure and privilege, interpretation with flair being their right.

The December 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from October 17, and available to order online now – with Bob Dylan on the cover and an exclusive unreleased Dylan track on our free CD. Elsewhere in the issue, there’s Robert Smith, Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy, Pink Floyd, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, Prince, Joni Mitchell, Bruce Springsteen, Jeff Lynne, Booker T, Tindersticks and much more.

The Replacements – Dead Man’s Pop

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If ever an album was a fixer-upper, it’s The Replacements’ 1989 Don’t Tell A Soul. With a recording process that was chaotic and self-destructive even by the Minnesota quartet’s peerless standards, a firestorm of external and internal band pressures, and sky-high expectations after their peak Let It Be/Tim/Pleased To Meet Me run, the album was primed to fail.

So Dead Man’s Pop, the working title for Don’t Tell A Soul, is the rarer form of deluxe-edition boxset, not an obsessive documentation of a treasured work, but a reclamation project. Presenting essentially two new versions of the record, in addition to a live show and bonus tracks from the period, it argues that a few tweaks can rewrite the historical place of The Replacements’ sixth record from the start of their decline to a last gasp of their ’80s college-rock dominance.

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At the time, Don’t Tell A Soul set its sights even higher, as the Warner Brothers executive suite felt they were ready to graduate to mainstream success. With frontman Paul Westerberg finally taking his singer-songwriter role seriously and wildman guitarist Bob Stinson officially departed, the industry was ready to anoint them, alongside their friendly rivals REM, as The Great American Rock Hope at the end of the ’80s.

But after two troubled sessions with inexperienced producers steamrolled by The Replacements’ path of bottle-draining destruction, Don’t Tell A Soul landed like the double compromise it was – between Westerberg’s ambitions and the limitations of his band, and between the polished hit single dreams of the record company and the band’s untameable anarchy.

Funnily enough, one of those production casualties gets first crack at a salvage job, as original producer Matt Wallace – who would later record successes for Maroon 5, John Hiatt and Faith No More – helms the remixed, “redux” version of Don’t Tell A Soul. Beyond just updating the original’s reedy, compressed mix to modern loudness standards and reshuffling the tracklist, Wallace chips away at the ’80s jangle and gated drums to reveal the ragtag glory beneath.

“We’ll Inherit The Earth”, which originally sidled in with Mellotron and a morse-code diddle, now stomps into the room with distorted bass and unhinged arpeggios, while quirky, radio-unfriendly decisions – a banjo in “Talent Show”, a trumpet in “Back To Back”, assorted studio chatter – are restored. Most dramatically altered is “They’re Blind”, a gauzy slow dance now even slower, lengthened by almost a minute and menaced by guitar feedback instead of an insipid mandolin.

The second disc presents yet another alternate-dimension Don’t Tell A Soul, this time drawn from the infamously scrapped Bearsville sessions, concisely summed up by Westerberg (in Bob Mehr’s brilliant biography Trouble Boys) as, “We went up there, hit a fucking tree, threw knives at each other, walked across the board, smashed up some shit, scared Metallica.”

For the most part, these sessions sound like very, very expensive demos, not put through The Hit Machine yet, but not particularly energetic either. Here, the real gem is an early version of “Portland”, a countrified apology for one of their legendarily worst concerts, later stripped for parts and repurposed as “Talent Show”. There’s also an unadorned “Rock’N’Roll Ghost” – just acoustic 
guitar, voice, and organ – that puts the song up with “Here Comes A Regular” in the echelon of disquieting Westerberg self-assessments.

Another holy grail for ’Mats completists is the impromptu session with Tom Waits, recorded one whiskey-fuelled overnight in a Los Angeles studio. Waits and Westerberg trade improvised lines over stock blues in “Lowdown Monkey Blues”, and rehearse a couple of Replacements tracks and Billy Swan’s “I Can Help”. Like a lot of drunken nights, it was probably more fun to experience than to hear about later.

The other two discs, The Complete Inconcerated Live, present a full June 1989 show from Milwaukee that nicely complements For Sale: Live at Maxwell’s 1986, released in 2017. Where that set captured the ’Mats on their hyperactive upswing, feverishly launching into covers they only barely knew how to 
play, the 1989 show is the band, if not exactly mature, at least at the peak of their songbook and still ornery in all 
the right ways.

Live is also probably where the Don’t Tell A Soul material sounds most naturally Replacements, fitting snugly alongside classics “Bastards Of Young” and “Little Mascara”. In fact, the best version of the record might be assembled from these pressure-free versions. A forgettable album track like the bubblegummy “Asking Me Lies” finds new life in Westerberg’s slurred, sweary vocals and the rhythm section’s gutter swing, while “Darlin’ One” hits the sweet spot in their Venn diagram of sad, angry and anthemic.

That Dead Man’s Pop even exists is a small miracle, given the band’s propensity to erase master tapes or throw them into rivers. And for a band whose chaotic vibe was infamously difficult to capture in the studio, having so many data points by which to triangulate this less-lauded era is valuable. While the full deluxe treatment might not lift Don’t Tell A Soul all the way to “lost classic” status, it at least fleshes out an underappreciated chapter of The Replacements’ messy saga.

The December 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from October 17, and available to order online now – with Bob Dylan on the cover and an exclusive unreleased Dylan track on our free CD. Elsewhere in the issue, there’s Robert Smith, Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy, Pink Floyd, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, Prince, Joni Mitchell, Bruce Springsteen, Jeff Lynne, Booker T, Tindersticks and much more.

Gary Numan: “David Bowie asked for me to be thrown out of the studio”

Originally published in Uncut’s March 2018 issue

While Gary Numan’s music is defiantly industrial in construction and dystopian in theme, the man himself cuts a pleasingly down-to-earth figure. Here he is, explaining to Uncut what’s on his touring rider: “Americans aren’t very good at bread,” he says. “So I ask for some decent bread, some butter and peanut butter. I’m so easily pleased, it’s embarrassing…”

It is late December and Numan is in Colorado on the closing dates of a 30-date North American tour. It is the latest leg in a global trek that has been running since September in support of Numan’s current album, Savage: Songs From A Broken World. “The energy level is good,” he reports. “But the repetitive nature is beginning to wear a little bit.” Nevertheless, Numan is still vibed up for the business of the day: soon he has a pre-show meet-and-greet with fans, a soundcheck and then emails to catch up with before the gig. But first, he has your questions to answer – on a range of subjects, including voting Tory in his youth, ferrying indie pop stars round the UK in his private airplane and an unexpected encounter with Queen in the Far East. “It’s easy – talking about myself! I could do that all day!”

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

__________________________

A lot of people fetishise old synths: ARPs, Wasps and so on. Do you see the appeal 
in that? Or are you 
glad technology 
has moved on?
Nat Wellington, London
I don’t see any appeal in it at all. To me, synthesisers have always been like screwdrivers, hammers – tools you use to do a certain job, and once that job is done then I prefer to move on and find a new tool for the next job. There are a lot of people who look back on that early era of synthesisers, but those machines are of a kind. I think if you’ve made a number of albums with them, you’ve used the available palette of sound. Electronic music is about finding new sounds and new methods and moving forward.

Do you still have the 
fabled Mini Moog you discovered in the studio 
in late 1978?
Grace Astor, Leeds
I have few items of 
the original gear, but I do have a Mini Moog. When I lived in East Sussex, I had 
a garage with an attic roof. We put the house on the market, and I decided to clean out all this ivy that had grown in through the attic and smothered everything up there. I was hacking away, and I found a fucking 
Mini Moog pretty much growing under a bush. I got it done up again and it’s all lovely. I think my dad’s got it.

You were at Victoria Station in May 1976 when Bowie arrived off the Orient Express. Did he really make 
a Nazi salute?
Nick Edwards, Cambridge
I was there all day and never saw him! 
I was 18. I’m pretty sure I was wearing a green boiler suit. I just remember being there with lots and lots of Bowie fans and everyone went mad, screaming with exciting, but I couldn’t see him. In the ’80s, I did the Kenny Everett show and Bowie was on, too. I was a massive fan, I had seen him countless times; I had an embarrassing array of bootlegs. The chance to even be remotely near him was an honour. But he asked for me to be thrown out of the studio and then taken off the programme, which was very disappointing. But as the years have gone by, I understood far more the way he saw things then. He was still a young man, with ups and downs in his own career, and I think he saw people like me as little upstarts. But later he said some nice 
things about me, so that made the whole thing better!

Nick Cave And The Bad Seeds announce European and UK tour dates

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Nick Cave And The Bad Seeds have announce details of a 2020 European and UK tour.

The tour begins in April in Portugal and closes in June in Israel. The band also play seven shows in the UK, including two shows at London’s O2 Arena.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

The band’s latest album, Ghosteen, is reviewed in the new issue of Uncut – in shops now.

Wednesday 22 April Campo Pequeno, Lisbon, Portugal
Thursday 23 April Campo Pequeno, Lisbon, Portugal
Saturday 25 April WiZink Center, Madrid, Spain
Sunday 26 April Palau Sant Jordi, Barcelona, Spain
Wednesday 29 April Ziggo Dome, Amsterdam, Holland
Thursday 30 April Sportpaleis, Antwerp, Belgium
Saturday 2 May Arena Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
Sunday 3 May Motorpoint Arena, Cardiff, UK
Tuesday 5 May The SSE Hydro, Glasgow, UK
Wednesday 6 May Manchester Arena, Manchester, UK
Friday 8 May 3Arena, Dublin, Ireland
Tuesday 12 May First Direct Arena, Leeds, UK
Thursday 14 May The O2, London, UK
Friday 15 May The O2, London, UK
Sunday 17 May Lanxess Arena, Cologne, Germany
Monday 18 May Barclaycard Arena, Hamburg, Germany
Wednesday 20 May Royal Arena, Copenhagen, Denmark
Thursday 21 May Royal Arena, Copenhagen, Denmark
Saturday 23 May Ericsson Globe, Stockholm, Sweden
Monday 25 May Spektrum, Oslo, Norway
Wednesday 27 May Mercedes-Benz Arena, Berlin, Germany
Thursday 28 May Arena Gliwice, Gliwice, Poland
Saturday 30 May O2 Arena, Prague, Czech Republic
Monday 1 June Stadthalle, Vienna, Austria
Tuesday 2 June László Papp Budapest Sportaréna, Budapest, Hungary
Thursday 4 June Stark Arena, Belgrade, Serbia
Saturday 6 June Olympiahalle, Munich, Germany
Monday 8 June Hallenstadion, Zurich, Switzerland
Tuesday 9 June Mediolanum Forum, Milan, Italy
Thursday 11 June Cavea Auditorium Parco della Musica, Rome, Italy
Sunday 14 June AccorHotels Arena, Paris, France
Wednesday 17 June Bloomfield Stadium, Tel Aviv, Israel

Tickets on sale Friday 25 October at 10am local times at nickcave.com
*Paris on sale Monday 28 October at 10am local time
*Tel Aviv on sale Tuesday 22 October at 8am local time

The December 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from October 17, and available to order online now – with Bob Dylan on the cover and an exclusive unreleased Dylan track on our free CD. Elsewhere in the issue, there’s Robert Smith, Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy, Pink Floyd, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, Prince, Joni Mitchell, Bruce Springsteen, Jeff Lynne, Booker T, Tindersticks and much more.

Revealed! The inside story of Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash’s Nashville summit

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With Travelin’ Thru, 1967 – 1969: The Bootleg Series Vol. 15 – the latest lavish archeological survey of Bob Dylan‘s archive – due for release on November 1, Uncut talks to the musicians closest to Dylan about this remarkable chapter in his career – and his momentous summit with a fellow titan of American music, Johnny Cash.

The issue also comes with an exclusive unreleased Dylan track on our free CD.

In the new issue of Uncut, in UK shops now or available to order online by clicking here, Cash biographer Graeme Thomson unearths the truth behind Dylan’s Nashville sojourn – including a momentous February 1969 session with Cash.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

“You know, it wasn’t anything that we thought was strange, Dylan being in Nashville,” insists Cash’s drummer, WS “Fluke” Holland. “We were happy for him to be there; it made a kind of sense. If you think about types of music – country, rockabilly, rock’n’roll, blues, whatever – I don’t really know what you’d call the type of music that Bob was doing. It was always something different, but always him.”

On the night of February 17, Dylan and Cash cut three songs together. Documentary maker Bob Elfstrom was among those watching the session. “Neither of them could remember the lyrics, and the session had to stop for an hour if not longer,” Elfstrom recalls. “They had people dashing around the building to find a copy of the lyrics so they could do the song… The general impression I had was that it was highly improvised. They would 
go and listen to playback and then try something else. Very casual. They were having fun together.”

This light-hearted mood sustains throughout the takes featured on Travelin’ Thru. The highlight of the first night is a mash-up of Dylan’s “Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right” and Cash’s brazen doppelgänger, “Understand Your Man”. The men 
sing their own compositions separately before, at Cash’s behest, they swap, singing the other’s song simultaneously over the same chord pattern. “Do you know it?” Cash asks Dylan with a chuckle, adding, “We both stole it from the same song…” – a reference to the fact that the melody was liberally ‘adapted’ from Paul Clayton’s 1960 song, “Who’s Gonna Buy You Ribbons When I’m Gone?”

They convened again the following day, cutting further versions of their own songs alongside old country tunes, rock’n’roll staples, traditional standards, religious hymns, Jimmie Rodgers blue yodels and much else besides. “It was kind of like a Sun Records session,” says WS Holland, who played drums on both days. “We go in, and nobody knew exactly what they were going to do or sing. We were more or less cutting up and having a big time, and not really all that serious about being really good. We didn’t think too much about what we were doing.”

In Cash, Dylan had also found a man who shared his love of making music on the hoof. “We didn’t ever really know what John was thinking when he 
went into a session,” says Holland. “He liked to be spontaneous. He did things on impulse, and often 
it worked really good.”

On the tapes, you hear Cash generate the fuel that keeps the session running. He’s a fount of ideas, demands, suggestions, ad libs and cornball jokes. 
On “Mountain Dew”, Cash says, “You know, this would be real funny if you talked off a verse…” and Dylan duly gives it a good-natured stab. Later the Man in Black asks, “What religious songs do you know, Bob?”, prompting Dylan to offer a strangulated “amen” in response to Cash’s earnest testifying. On “Careless Love”, there’s much light-hearted messing around with numbers relating to various firearms. There’s further joshing on “Five Feet High And Rising”: “How high’s the water, Bob?” jabs Cash. “How high’s the manure, Bob?”

“It’s a recording of two guys doing a song pull on 
a porch – except it’s those two guys!” says Bootleg Series co-producer Steve Berkowitz. “There is clearly a joy and mutual respect. They’re liking doing this – and they know a lot of songs! They’ve had incomparable success, but they really love playing and they love music. They’re doing this American history thing, just calling it out like brothers or cousins. It’s a beautiful thing to hear that moment of creation.”

You can read much more about Dylan and Cash in the new issue of Uncut, out now with Bob Dylan on the cover.

The December 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from October 17, and available to order online now – with Bob Dylan on the cover and an exclusive unreleased Dylan track on our free CD. Elsewhere in the issue, there’s Robert Smith, Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy, Pink Floyd, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, Prince, Joni Mitchell, Bruce Springsteen, Jeff Lynne, Booker T, Tindersticks and much more.

The Beatles’ singles compiled on 7″ box set

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The Beatles: The Singles Collection is a new 7″ box set to be released by Apple Corps on November 22.

It includes reproductions of the 22 UK singles released during the band’s lifetime, plus mid-’90s efforts “Free As A Bird” / “Real Life”.

All singles have been newly cut for vinyl from their original mono and stereo master tapes by Sean Magee at Abbey Road Studios and pressed onto 180-gram 7″ vinyl singles in faithfully reproduced international picture sleeves.

The Beatles: The Singles Collection comes accompanied by a 40-page booklet with photos, ephemera, and detailed essays by Beatles historian Kevin Howlett.

Peruse the tracklisting below and pre-order the box set here.

1962 [sleeve art: U.S.]
A: Love Me Do
B: P. S. I Love You

1963 [sleeve art: Italy]
A: Please Please Me
B: Ask Me Why

1963 [sleeve art: Norway]
A: From Me To You
B: Thank You Girl

1963 [sleeve art: Greece]
A: She Loves You
B: I’ll Get You

1963 [sleeve art: Chile]
A: I Want To Hold Your Hand
B: This Boy

1964 [sleeve art: Austria]
A: Can’t Buy Me Love
B: You Can’t Do That

1964 [sleeve art: Holland]
A: A Hard Day’s Night
B: Things We Said Today

1964 [sleeve art: Sweden]
A: I Feel Fine
B: She’s A Woman

1965 [sleeve art: Spain]
A: Ticket To Ride
B: Yes It Is

1965 [sleeve art: Belgium]
A: Help!
B: I’m Down

1965 [double A-side / sleeve art: France]
A: We Can Work It Out
A: Day Tripper

1966 [sleeve art: Turkey]
A: Paperback Writer
B: Rain

1966 [double A-side / sleeve art: Argentina]
A: Eleanor Rigby
A: Yellow Submarine

1967 [double A-side / sleeve art: Australia]
A: Strawberry Fields Forever
A: Penny Lane

1967 [sleeve art: West Germany]
A: All You Need Is Love
B: Baby, You’re A Rich Man

1967 [sleeve art: Mexico]
A: Hello, Goodbye
B: I Am The Walrus

1968 [sleeve art: Japan]
A: Lady Madonna
B: The Inner Light

1968 [sleeve art: South Africa]
A: Hey Jude
B: Revolution

1969 [sleeve art: Denmark]
A: Get Back
B: Don’t Let Me Down

1969 [sleeve art: Portugal]
A: The Ballad Of John And Yoko
B: Old Brown Shoe

1969 [sleeve art: Israel]
A: Something
B: Come Together

1970 [sleeve art: UK]
A: Let It Be
B: You Know My Name (Look Up The Number)

1995 / 1996 [exclusive double A-side single / sleeve art: worldwide]
A: Free As A Bird [1995]
A: Real Love [1996]

The November 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale now, with Jimmy Page on the cover. Our free CD features 17 exclusive cover versions of Wilco songs recorded for us by Low, Courtney Barnett, Cate Le Bon, Kurt Vile and many more. Elsewhere in the issue, there’s Kim Gordon, The Clash live and unseen, Angel Olsen, Tinariwen, Bruce Hornsby, Super Furry Animals, Bob Nastanovich on David Berman and Roger McGuinn.

Hear Steve Gunn’s new acoustic EP

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Steve Gunn has released a compilation of performance videos from recent European tours, capturing him playing live, in session and in various unusual locations such as a bookshop, a converted convent in Ghent and on a London street.

Watch the ‘Unseen Anthology’ below:

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It coincides with the release today of a seven-track EP, featuring acoustic versions of songs from Gunn’s album The Unseen In Between. Listen to Acoustic Unseen below:

The November 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale now, with Jimmy Page on the cover. Our free CD features 17 exclusive cover versions of Wilco songs recorded for us by Low, Courtney Barnett, Cate Le Bon, Kurt Vile and many more. Elsewhere in the issue, there’s Kim Gordon, The Clash live and unseen, Angel Olsen, Tinariwen, Bruce Hornsby, Super Furry Animals, Bob Nastanovich on David Berman and Roger McGuinn.

Watch a video for Michael Kiwanuka’s new single, “Hero”

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Michael Kiwanuka’s new album Kiwanuka will be released by Polydor on November 1.

Today, he’s posted a video for the next single to be taken from it, “Hero”. Watch below:

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Says Kiwanuka: “‘Hero’ is a song about how the gems of this world always seem to die young, and how those who are oppressed often seem to have the most to offer us.”

Ahead of a full tour next year, Kiwanuka will play three in-store performances later this month. Details are listed below, with tickets available here for fans who pre-order the album:

24th October – Pryzm, London for Banquet Records
27th October – Fat Sam’s, Dundee for Assai Records
28th October – Liquid Room, Edinburgh for Assai Records

The December 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from October 17, and available to order online now – with Bob Dylan on the cover and an exclusive unreleased Dylan track on our free CD. Elsewhere in the issue, there’s Robert Smith, Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy, Pink Floyd, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, Prince, Joni Mitchell, Bruce Springsteen, Jeff Lynne, Booker T, Tindersticks and much more.

Uncut – December 2019

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Bob Dylan, Robert Smith, Nick Cave And The Bad Seeds, Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy and Pink Floyd all feature in the new Uncut, dated December 2019 and available to buy from October 17. International readers, scroll below to find out where you can pick up a copy.

BOB DYLAN: As pivotal sessions are released on the new Bootleg Sessions album, we tell the full story of the legendary Nashville summit between Dylan and Johnny Cash. Along the way, there are tales of velvet suits, trips to the circus and nocturnal shenanigans at the Black Poodle in Printer’s Alley. “There was an incredible electricity!”

NEW MUSIC CD: Featuring an unreleased Bob Dylan track, and great new songs from Warmduscher, Itasca, Tindersticks, Jim Sullivan, Girl Ray, JR Bohannon, Sudan Archives and more.

Plus! Inside the issue, you’ll find…

ROBERT SMITH: Having brought The Cure’s 40th anniversary celebrations to a close, Smith is finally ready to unleash the band’s first new album since 2008. He explains all: “I think it’s going to alienate any kind of pop audience we still have…”

NICK CAVE AND THE BAD SEEDS: The group’s powerful new album, Ghosteen, is our Album Of The Month, and is reviewed at length here – ‘Nick Cave has surpassed himself, redefining the shape and purpose of his writing…’

BONNIE ‘PRINCE’ BILLY:
As Will Oldham returns with his first album of original songs in eight years, we catch up with him in the recesses of a Kentucky bookshop to discuss octopus hunting in Hawaii, the joy of pseudonyms and songwriting.

PINK FLOYD:
How does a 1970s giant embrace a new decade? We hear all about the Floyd’s ’80s creative rebirth, from band members, old friends and collaborators. “They were in it, heart and soul. It wasn’t just some money-making thing.”

JONI MITCHELL:
We take a look inside Morning Glory On The Vine, Joni’s 1971 scrapbook of drawings and lyrics that’s being published for the first time.

JEFF LYNNE:
The ELO conductor and chicken pie connoisseur tells Uncut about his lifelong search for sonic perfection.

TINDERSTICKS:
Stuart A Staples takes us through his band’s work to date – “I’m used to sitting in my studio considering everything for quite a long time!”

PRINCE: The making of his breakthrough hit “1999” – “It was an epiphany!”

In our expansive reviews section, we take a look at new records from The Who, Itasca, Desert Sessions, Sudan Archives, Miranda Lambert and more, and archival releases from REM, Gene Clark, The Dukes Of Stratosphear, Jim Sullivan and Peter Green’s Fleetwood Mac. We catch Richard Thompson’s 70th birthday celebrations live, and also review The Beach Bum, That’ll Be The Day, Stardust and more.Plus, Jane Weaver takes us through her favourite records, Booker T answers your questions, Martha High discusses James Brown and her new album, and we meet Warmduscher.

Subscribe to Uncut and make huge savings on the cover price – find out by clicking here!

International readers can pick up a copy at the following stores:

The Netherlands: Bruna and AKO (Schiphol)

Sweden: Pressbyrån

Norway: Narvesen

U.S.A. (out in November): Barnes & Noble

Canada (out December): Indigo

Australia (out December): Independent newsagents

Bob Dylan is on the cover of the new Uncut – with an exclusive unreleased Dylan track on our free CD

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Before I introduce the issue, just a quick note about Ginger Baker. The news of Ginger’s death reached Uncut after our December issue had gone to press. As a consequence, we were unable to include a tribute this; but rest assured, we’ll mark his passing in the January 2020 edition of Uncut.

The new Uncut is in shops from Thursday, October 17 but available to buy now by clicking here

You find us, though, already busying ourselves on our end of year polls. It’s too early to start predicting what our albums of the year will be – you’ll need to come back next month for the finished poll – but browsing a personal list I’ve been keeping on my own favourite albums from 2019, I’m heartened about how much excellent new music there’s been this year. You’ll have read about much of it in the pages of Uncut, of course. This year, we’ve brought you features on younger artists including Jessica Pratt, Big Thief, Jake Xerxes Fussell, Joan Shelley and Angel Olsen, as well as introductory pieces on Hen Ogledd, Olivia Chaney, Bodega, Kel Assouf, Drug Dealer, Sunwatchers, Jamila Woods, Mega Bog, Nérija, Altin Gun and Arp. This month, we bring you Fat White Family offshoot Warmduscher – who arrive in Uncut complete with a testimonial from Iggy Pop – while among the month’s new releases there are splendid albums from Itasca, Sudan Archives and Sessa to recommend.

You’ll probably have spotted a few familiar faces in this issue, too. Among these, we’re thrilled to bring you a story not previously told in Uncut, centred around Bob Dylan’s potent hook ups with Johnny Cash in Columbia’s Studio A in Nashville. Graeme Thomson has unearthed some excellent eyewitnesses to reveal the full story of this momentous summit – and the making of Dylan’s two albums around the Cash team-up. We’re thrilled, also, to host an exclusive unreleased Dylan track on our CD, one of the highlights of the Travelin’ Thru, 1967 – 1969: The Bootleg Series Vol. 15 box set.

If the Dylan/Cash story is ultimately about two dominant cultural figures as they navigate transitionary periods in their careers, then I guess much of the issue conveniently follows a similar theme. There’s Robert Smith, mulling over the end of his band’s 40th anniversary celebrations and looking forwards towards – finally! – a new Cure album; Will Oldham, meanwhile, prepares once again to release his first new music as Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy in eight years; Jeff Lynne contemplates an ever shifting career as a Brumbeat contender, Traveling Wilbury and beyond; Prince’s former collaborators recall an apocalypse-baiting breakthrough; finally, we find Pink Floyd reflecting on a period of intense recalibration following the departure of their principal composer…

There’s plenty more, as you’d imagine. Alas, the spreadsheet beckons, Back to those end of year charts…

Follow me on Twitter @MichaelBonner

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

The December 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from October 17, and available to order online now – with Bob Dylan on the cover and an exclusive unreleased Dylan track on our free CD. Elsewhere in the issue, there’s Robert Smith, Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy, Pink Floyd, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, Prince, Joni Mitchell, Bruce Springsteen, Jeff Lynne, Booker T, Tindersticks and much more.

Watch Bruce Springsteen’s London Film Festival Q&A

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Bruce Springsteen made a public appearance at the London Film Festival this weekend, to present his new Western Stars film.

You can watch a clip from the post-screening Q&A with Springsteen and co-director Thom Zimny below:

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Western Stars is showing in select cinemas from October 28, with the accompanying soundtrack album released a few days earlier on October 25. Watch the trailer below:

You can read more about Springsteen and the Western Stars film in the new issue of Uncut, in UK shops on Thursday (October 17).

The November 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale now, with Jimmy Page on the cover. Our free CD features 17 exclusive cover versions of Wilco songs recorded for us by Low, Courtney Barnett, Cate Le Bon, Kurt Vile and many more. Elsewhere in the issue, there’s Kim Gordon, The Clash live and unseen, Angel Olsen, Tinariwen, Bruce Hornsby, Super Furry Animals, Bob Nastanovich on David Berman and Roger McGuinn.

Richard Dawson’s favourite albums: “It takes a while to learn your lessons”

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The radical folk warrior on the records that have altered his brain chemistry, from Iron Maiden to Sun Ra…

Originally published in Uncut’s January 2018 issue

______________________________

IRON MAIDEN
IRON MAIDEN
1980

When I was about 12, I used to creep into my sister’s room and try out her records. One of the first ones I tried was this, because of the amazing artwork. It was so exciting. I loved the raw sound of it, but there’s also stuff in there that’s as complex as classical music. I’d only heard pop up to that point, so it really blew my mind. I think when people think about Iron Maiden they think about the cod-rock fantasy thing, which is all well and good, but the first couple of albums are really urban, and feel quite dangerous. I’ve still got it, it’s out on the play pile.

______________________________

SUN RA
ATLANTIS
1969

I could have picked any number of Sun Ra albums, but recently we’ve been listening to this one on tour. It’s really great, you can really hear the room. To me, it teaches something about how to play free music: you don’t have to be wild, you can just be very spacious and loose. It almost sounds like an odd little wooden puzzle, it’s got this clockwork feeling to it. It’s helped us in many a rainy traffic jam, it just keeps your momentum up. I’m totally into the myths too – he wasn’t human, he didn’t identify as such, and he has good reasons not to do so. To me, he’s the cornerstone of all music.

______________________________

DIANA ROSS & THE SUPREMES
REFLECTIONS
1967

It’s a beautiful record, just completely faultless. But it’s so strange – the bass on it is turned up so loud, it’s fabulous. What I really like about Diana is that she has this glassiness about her delivery, which I think makes everything much more moving. I got into this when I worked in a record shop, and it wormed its way in. I didn’t love it at first, but then I started to see it less as a Motown record and more as a slightly odd space band. I had to track down a copy myself – I’ve got it for five or six people since, that’s how much I like it.

______________________________

ORCHESTRA BAOBAB
MANSA
1999

This was recorded in 1978, I think, so you can hear the tape hiss, you can hear all these imperfections on the tape. Also the bass is tuned flat, and it gives the record this full feeling, it’s really amazing. If that bass was perfectly in tune and on the nose, the record wouldn’t sound half as good. When everything isn’t quite fitting together, then things have to bleed over the edges of everything else, and it makes for a really interesting sound. It’s also got one of my favourite guitar solos – it’s almost like a little tweeting bird. I know this isn’t very helpful for a magazine article, but you’ll have to hear it!

Send us your questions for Bill Callahan

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An Audience With Bill Callahan! There was a time, back in the days of Smog – the obfuscatory band name under which Callahan released 11 albums between 1990 and 2005 – when such a thing would have seemed unthinkable.

Interviews were rare and often halting affairs, with Callahan pleading that his personal life was irrelevant to an understanding of the numb and desolate characters who peopled his songs.

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But this year’s terrific Shepherd In A Sheepskin Vest revealed a very different Bill Callahan. Released after a hiatus of six years during which time he got married and became a father, it’s intimate, inviting and surprisingly easygoing.

“We’re not going to get anywhere if we are guarded with ourselves,” Callahan told Uncut earlier this year. And so here he is, generously inviting you, the Uncut readers, to give him a good-natured grilling.

So what do you want to ask one of America’s most celebrated and mysterious songwriters? Send your questions to audiencewith@uncut.co.uk by Monday October 21 and Bill will answer the best ones in a future issue of Uncut.

The November 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale now, with Jimmy Page on the cover. Our free CD features 17 exclusive cover versions of Wilco songs recorded for us by Low, Courtney Barnett, Cate Le Bon, Kurt Vile and many more. Elsewhere in the issue, there’s Kim Gordon, The Clash live and unseen, Angel Olsen, Tinariwen, Bruce Hornsby, Super Furry Animals, Bob Nastanovich on David Berman and Roger McGuinn.

Watch Bob Dylan play “Lenny Bruce” for the first time in 11 years

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Bob Dylan played the first date of his latest North American tour at the Donald Bren Events Center in Irvine, California, on Friday (October 11).

After opening the show with “Beyond Here Lies Nothin'” – presumably in tribute to the song’s co-writer Robert Hunter, who died last monthDylan added a couple more songs to the set list from his preceding European tour.

One of those was Time Out Of Mind’s “Not Dark Yet”; another was Shot Of Love’s “Lenny Bruce”, last played live in 2008 – watch that below:

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

Dylan also introduced two new members to his band: Matt Chamberlain, once of Pearl Jam, has replaced long-term drummer George Recile; while Bob Britt – who played on Time Out Of Mind – has joined as an additional guitarist.

You can hear the full Irvine show below:

The November 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale now, with Jimmy Page on the cover. Our free CD features 17 exclusive cover versions of Wilco songs recorded for us by Low, Courtney Barnett, Cate Le Bon, Kurt Vile and many more. Elsewhere in the issue, there’s Kim Gordon, The Clash live and unseen, Angel Olsen, Tinariwen, Bruce Hornsby, Super Furry Animals, Bob Nastanovich on David Berman and Roger McGuinn.