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Rare Pink Floyd posters up for auction

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A cache of rare Pink Floyd posters is due to go under the hammer at Ewbank’s Auctions tomorrow (December 13).

They date from the first psychedelic happenings of late 1966, when the band were usually billed as The Pink Floyd. View a selection of the posters below:

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“This collection of posters comprise a fascinating historical archive of one of rock’s most influential bands on the cusp of fame,” said Ewbank’s Auctions specialist Alastair McCrea. “They demonstrate the issues that concerned them, the zeitgeist of the times and the raw energy of the designs that were typical of the period. This is a rare opportunity to acquire such a unique slice of rock history.”

For more details on Ewbank’s Entertainment Memorabilia sale, which also includes items relating to T. Rex, Oasis and Bruce Springsteen, go here.

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The January 2019 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jack White on the cover. Inside, White heads up our Review Of The Year – which also features the best new albums, archive releases, films and books of the last 12 months. Aside from White, there are exclusive interviews with Paul Weller, Elvis Costello, Stephen Malkmus, Courtney Barnett, Low and Mélissa Laveaux. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best music of 2018.

Introducing The Cure: The Deluxe Ultimate Music Guide

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From the earliest days of The Cure, it seems that Robert Smith has kept one eye focused on his band’s legacy. Earlier this year, for instance, Smith revealed that he still had a cassette recording of the band’s first gig as The Cure – on July 9, 1978 at The Rocket, a local pub in Crawley. “I used to record everything from the side of the stage,” he told BBC Radio 6 Music. The gig, we learn, ended in a fight – “as proper gigs usually do, it was a good night” – but Smith’s keen archivist instincts fortuitously remained intact.

With the absence of any new music from The Cure since 2008’s 4:13 Dream, Smith has subtly reconfigured his role in the band. He has taken on an increasingly curatorial position, overseeing expansive live sets that act as extended celebrations of his band’s singular legacy, like their show at Hyde Park over summer, or more intimate fan-pleasing events including their Cureation appearance at Meltdown.

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The band’s 40th anniversary celebrations this year further allowed Smith and his cohorts the opportunity to reflect on a remarkable career – from their earliest days in the pubs of West Sussex through to their Disintegration-era imperial phase and beyond.

All of this, incidentally, is documented in our updated and upgraded edition of our Ultimate Music Guide to The Cure, featuring a bespoke forward from Lol Tolhurst. This is available in shops from December 18, but available now from our online store.

“To me, Robert’s always been exactly the same – like he was back then, but almost sixty years old,” Tolhurt tells us. “We formed a band, just practicing in the music room. The late ‘70s in England was particularly horrible and pretty violent – trips to the pub could end up with your face smashed in. We made music to keep us out of that, and to get out of Crawley…”

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The January 2019 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jack White on the cover. Inside, White heads up our Review Of The Year – which also features the best new albums, archive releases, films and books of the last 12 months. Aside from White, there are exclusive interviews with Paul Weller, Elvis Costello, Stephen Malkmus, Courtney Barnett, Low and Mélissa Laveaux. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best music of 2018.

Nick Cave responds to Brian Eno over criticism of Israel shows

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In response to a fan question on his Red Hand Files site, Nick Cave has published an email that he sent to Brian Eno following criticism of The Bad Seeds’ decision to go ahead with their shows in Israel last year.

Eno is a key figure in the Artists For Palestine movement, which advocates a cultural boycott of Israel. In the email, Cave calls the boycott “cowardly and shameful” and says that part of the reason he played Israel was “as a principled stand against those who wish to bully, shame and silence musicians.”

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“Clearly the decision for The Bad Seeds to play in Israel is contentious for some people,” writes Cave. “But to be clear on this: I do not support the current government in Israel, yet do not accept that my decision to play in the country is any kind of tacit support for that government’s policies. Nor do I condone the atrocities that you have described; nor am I ignorant of them. I am aware of the injustices suffered by the Palestinian population, and wish, with all people of good conscience, that their suffering is ended via a comprehensive and just solution, one that involves enormous political will on both sides of the equation.”

Cave goes on to suggest that the boycott “does not work… rather, it risks further entrenching positions in Israel in opposition to those you support.” Instead, he suggests musicians could make a much more powerful statement “if you were to go to Israel and tell the press and the Israeli people how you feel about their current regime, then do a concert on the understanding that the purpose of your music was to speak to the Israeli people’s better angels.

“What we actually have here is a fundamental difference of opinion as to what the purpose of music is.”

In a heartfelt addendum, Cave writes that “Brian Eno, beyond any other musician, taught my friends and me how to make music. The records he made remain some of the most important and essential recordings I have ever heard. So, if there seems to be a thread of anguish that runs through this letter, this is indeed the case. I am writing to my hero.

“Even so, certain questions need to be asked. How far must we have strayed from the transformative nature of music to feel justified in weaponising music and using it to punish ordinary Israeli citizens for the actions of their government. Furthermore, what has brought us to the point where certain musicians feel it is ethically sound to use forms of coercion and intimidation, in the form of ‘open’ letters, on fellow musicians who don’t agree with their point of view?

“Occasionally, I wonder if The Bad Seeds did the right thing in playing Israel. I cannot answer that question. I understand and accept the validity of many of the arguments that are presented to me. Indeed, some of my dearest friends in the music industry found my decision very difficult to accept, but there it is, after much consideration the decision was made: I simply could not treat my Israeli fans with the necessary contempt to do Brian Eno’s bidding.”

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The January 2019 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jack White on the cover. Inside, White heads up our Review Of The Year – which also features the best new albums, archive releases, films and books of the last 12 months. Aside from White, there are exclusive interviews with Paul Weller, Elvis Costello, Stephen Malkmus, Courtney Barnett, Low and Mélissa Laveaux. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best music of 2018.

The Waterboys, Richard Thompson and Caravan to play Cropredy

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The first batch of artists have been unveiled for Fairport’s Cropredy Convention, taking place near Banbury in Oxfordshire on August 8-10 2019.

The festival’s first night will be headlined by The Waterboys, with other acts announced including Martin Simpson, Seth Lakeman, Caravan and Richard Thompson, who will appear with his erstwhile bandmates Dave Mattacks, Dave Pegg and Simon Nicol.

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Hosts Fairport Convention will also play twice, opening the festival with an acoustic set on the Thursday and closing it with a two-hour headline set on the Saturday.

Tickets are on sale now from the official Cropredy site, priced £140 (camping tickets cost £45 for three nights). The first 1,000 orders will receive a Christmas card signed by all five members of Fairport Convention.

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The January 2019 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jack White on the cover. Inside, White heads up our Review Of The Year – which also features the best new albums, archive releases, films and books of the last 12 months. Aside from White, there are exclusive interviews with Paul Weller, Elvis Costello, Stephen Malkmus, Courtney Barnett, Low and Mélissa Laveaux. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best music of 2018.

Kate Bush – Remastered In Vinyl I-IV

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When a major artist announces a comprehensive reissue campaign it’s easy to become swept up in the excitement, especially when it’s a famously reclusive artist like Kate Bush. Having emerged from a quiet existence to reassess the sonic qualities of her full-length works, Bush’s Remastered In Vinyl feels like a gift to fans; a rare opportunity to intimately convene with her in a holistic evaluation of her artistic vision.

Anyone, however, who believes in the rarity of Kate Bush’s original albums for EMI hasn’t visited a used-record store lately. VG copies of The Kick Inside, The Dreaming, Hounds Of Love and others are pro forma in any reputable shop, and usually at a very reasonable price. However, survey Bush’s post-EMI works for the Fish People label, and the shop bins and Discogs listings become a bit thin. One crucial perk of this reissue campaign is that it obliterates price-gouging on vinyl copies of LPs such as The Red Shoes, Aerial (the least expensive Discogs listing is currently £135), Director’s Cut and 50 Words For Snow. Across three vinyl boxes, then, Bush now collects her albums The Kick Inside, Lionheart, Never For Ever, The Dreaming, Hounds Of Love, The Sensual World, The Red Shoes, Aerial, Director’s Cut and 50 Words For Snow. The fourth rounds up selected remixes, B-sides and covers never before seen together. CD versions collect the same material into two sets.

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It’s only natural that Bush, whose close artistic control is well documented, would lead the effort of fine-tuning the aural quality of her albums. She enlisted Pink Floyd producer and engineer James Guthrie, someone she’s worked with before: he engineered the orchestral sessions for Hounds Of Love and, 
more recently, mastered Bush’s 2011 album Director’s Cut, as well as a remastered version of The Red Shoes released the same year.

Director’s Cut, which reimagined songs from The Sensual World and The Red Shoes with new vocals, drumming and reworked instrumentation, was recorded using analogue equipment exclusively. The marked warmth of the songs reads as a cozy exchange between singer and audience. Bush’s new words for “The Sensual World”, retitled “Flower Of The Mountain” on Director’s Cut, are so close, so breathy, that they feel like a secret. 
The pair elicited the same bright quality for the 2011 version of The Red Shoes, which was remastered from backup analogue tapes, 
and this amber glow has been achieved in these 
new boxsets as well.

The drums on “Running Up That Hill (A Deal With God)” pound with a more robust and exuberant energy, mirroring the heartbeat thump the song still elicits, 33 years after its release. The same goes for the frantic rhythms of “Sat In Your Lap”, which are fuller and more bouyant. The instrumentation of “Wuthering Heights” at last feels in balance with the track’s striking vocals, as if they too were invited to perform from the stage, rather than projecting towards the singer from the pit. The layered likes of “Babooshka” feel more natural too, with evident care paid to the very bucolic potential of these recordings, even the ones heavily adorned in synthesisers and effects.

Despite the evident glow of the remastering work, the greatest treasure in this set lies in the collection of rarities. Covers include a rendition of Marvin Gaye’s “Sexual Healing” backed by a gospel choir, which originally appeared as the B-side of “King Of The Mountain” in 2005. Her celebrated 1991 covers of Elton John’s “Rocket Man” and “Candle In The Wind” are here, too. But the most arresting track in this section is her a cappella version of the Irish traditional “My Lagan Love”, the B-side of 1985’s “Cloudbusting”. Without instruments and accoutrements there is nothing to date the performance, no tone that makes it retro or kitschy. Instead Bush’s honeyed soprano pays homage to the song’s timelessness, a rendition so pure of heart it halts any thoughts of agedness or period through which Bush’s other works might be viewed. It embodies the finest qualities of a traditional, that which is meant to endure.

The A-side of that single, the extended “Cloudbusting (The Organon Mix)”, appears early in the sequence of this disc, and perfectly elevates the song’s enticing theatrical arc, from music video with Donald Sutherland to fleshed-out drama for the stage. The orchestra and choir play a key role in its magnetism, and it’s a must-listen for the unitiated. The same goes for the extended mix of “Experiment IV”, a subversively enchanting hit released to promote Bush’s first greatest hits collection, The Whole Story.

In between the alternate mixes and the covers lie 20 B-sides, bonus tracks, songs written for soundtracks, and remixes, which are a joy to peruse. “You Want Alchemy”, the B-side of “The Red Shoes” single, reveals the very soulful capabilities of Bush’s voice in its delicious hook: “You want alchemy/You turn the roses into gold.” “December Will Be Magic Again”, a saving grace of many a tired Christmas playlist, is deservingly included here, along with the less graceful holiday tune “Home For Christmas”. Pretty much every Bush tune you might possibly want to find is at last lined up and easy to navigate, and that the woman herself ostensibly chose the songs and sequence makes 
it that much more alluring. Despite its pedestrian title, Remastered In Vinyl is exceptional in its completeness.

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The January 2019 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jack White on the cover. Inside, White heads up our Review Of The Year – which also features the best new albums, archive releases, films and books of the last 12 months. Aside from White, there are exclusive interviews with Paul Weller, Elvis Costello, Stephen Malkmus, Courtney Barnett, Low and Mélissa Laveaux. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best music of 2018.

The Old Man And The Gun

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How does a movie icon bow out these days? With the haunting, soul-bearing Lucky, Harry Dean Stanton certainly raised the bar, but in The Old Man And The Gun, Robert Redford makes his swansong in a more accessible, tongue-in-cheek fashion. A literal tip of the hat to his heyday as the premier charming rogue of the late ’60s to mid-’70s, The Old Man And The Gun offers a crisp, 93-minute antidote to overblown Marvel superhero spectacles and weighty director “statements”.

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Based on the true story of The Over The Hill Gang, a loose trio of ageing criminals, David Lowery’s fantastically entertaining caper forgoes the backstories of his two sidekicks – no mean feat when they’re played by Tom Waits and Danny Glover – to focus on the ringleader, Forrest Tucker (Redford). Tucker is a gentleman and a thief, and after yet another successful bank raid, he meets and falls for the guileless Jewel (Sissy Spacek), to whom he recklessly confesses all. Inevitably, Jewel takes it for banter, setting the scene for a gentle but still surprisingly thrilling drama about a man living his life on the edge.

It says something about Redford’s presence that the sidelining of the likes of Waits and Glover barely registers, and that Casey Affleck’s performance as the cop on his trail feels more like a glorified cameo. Granted, we could perhaps have done with a little more of Spacek, a rare presence in the cinema these days, but The Old Man And The Gun is such a finely judged balance of light nostalgia and modern indie smarts that it doesn’t really matter. There’s lots for movie buffs, who can give themselves extra brownie points for getting the late Warren Oates’ guest spot; everyone else can just buckle up and enjoy the ride.

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The January 2019 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jack White on the cover. Inside, White heads up our Review Of The Year – which also features the best new albums, archive releases, films and books of the last 12 months. Aside from White, there are exclusive interviews with Paul Weller, Elvis Costello, Stephen Malkmus, Courtney Barnett, Low and Mélissa Laveaux. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best music of 2018.

Hear Lambchop’s new single, “The December-ish You”

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Lambchop have announced that their new album This (Is What I Wanted To Tell You) will be released by City Slang on March 22.

Hear lead single “The December-ish You” below. Describing the song, Lambchop majorodomo Kurt Wagner says: “Picture yourself on a boat on a river, with tangerine trees and marmalade skies… This is not that.”

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This (Is What I Wanted To Tell You) was sparked by a collaboration with Bon Iver sideman Matt McCaughan. It also features harmonica player Charlie McCoy, and trumpeter Jacob Valenzuela of Calexico.

Following the album’s release, Lambchop head out on a European tour in April, including a show at London’s EartH on April 21. See the full list of tourdates below:

12 Apr – Nijmegen, NL @ Doornroosje
13 Apr – Copenhagen, DK @ DR Koncerthuset, Studie 2
14 Apr – Oslo, NO @ Röverstaden
17 Apr – Leipzig, DE @ Felsenkeller
18 Apr – Munich, DE @ Muffathalle
19 Apr – Vienna, AT @ WUK
20 Apr – Darmstadt, DE @ Centralstation
21 Apr – London @ EartH
23 Apr – Paris, FR @ Maroquinerie
24 Apr – Bern, CH @ Dachstock, Reitschule
25 Apr – Zurich, CH @ Rote Fabrik
26 Apr – Berlin, DE @ Funkhaus
27 Apr – Cologne, DE @ Gloria
28 Apr – Brussels, BE @ Nuits Botanique Festival
29 Apr – Hamburg, DE @ Elbphilharmony
30 Apr – Amsterdam, NL @ Paradiso Noord

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The January 2019 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jack White on the cover. Inside, White heads up our Review Of The Year – which also features the best new albums, archive releases, films and books of the last 12 months. Aside from White, there are exclusive interviews with Paul Weller, Elvis Costello, Stephen Malkmus, Courtney Barnett, Low and Mélissa Laveaux. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best music of 2018.

Music world pays tribute to Buzzcocks frontman Pete Shelley

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Buzzcocks frontman Pete Shelley has died of a suspected heart attack, aged 63.

The band’s official Twitter account confirmed the news last night (December 6). Shelley died in Estonia where he had been living since 2012 with his Estonian-Canadian wife Greta.

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Shelley (né McNeish) formed Buzzcocks with Howard Devoto (né Trafford) in Bolton in 1975. They organised Sex Pistols’ seminal gig at Manchester’s Lesser Free Trade Hall in June 1976 and supported them when the Pistols returned to play the same venue a month later.

Buzzcocks’ self-released debut EP, Spiral Scratch, helped kickstart a DIY revolution. Devoto left the band soon afterwards, with guitarist Shelley stepping forward as frontman. He wrote the majority of the band’s indelible punk-pop singles, including “What Do I Get?”, “I Don’t Mind”, “Everybody’s Happy Nowadays” and UK No. 12 hit “Ever Fallen in Love (With Someone You Shouldn’t’ve)”.

Buzzcocks split in 1981 with Shelley launching a solo career that took his songwriting in a more electronic direction on singles such as “Homosapien”, banned by the BBC for its “explicit reference to gay sex”. Buzzcocks reformed in 1989, recording six more albums to add to the three they made in the late-70s, and touring with the likes of Nirvana and Pearl Jam.

Peter Hook, who played his first gig with Warsaw (soon to become Joy Division) supporting Buzzcocks, called Shelley “a true gent… He helped us so much at the start of our career out of a sheer love for all things punk. Without Pete & the Buzzcocks I would probably still be working at the docks.”

Pete Wylie wrote: “He should be remembered forever for the guitar solo in ‘Boredom’ alone. How utterly sad. And that Starway guitar was the punkrockest thing ever! Night night pretty Pete.”

“Pete Shelley wrote perfect three minute pop songs,” wrote The Charlatans’ Tim Burgess. “The soundtrack to being a teenager. You’ll be missed Pete but you’ll be remembered for a long long time for your brilliant music.”

R.E.M.’s Mike Mills wrote: “Damn. Pete Shelley gone. The Buzzcocks were and are a favorite of mine, and I was fortunate to be able to hang with Pete a few times and tell him so.”

Pearl Jam’s Jeff Ament wrote that “playing shows with the Buzzcocks was one of the highlights of my life. I listened to Singles and Tension as much as any records I’ve owned. Thank you Pete for all the great words and music.”

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The January 2019 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jack White on the cover. Inside, White heads up our Review Of The Year – which also features the best new albums, archive releases, films and books of the last 12 months. Aside from White, there are exclusive interviews with Paul Weller, Elvis Costello, Stephen Malkmus, Courtney Barnett, Low and Mélissa Laveaux. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best music of 2018.

The 34th Uncut New Music Playlist Of 2018

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1.
MICHAEL CHAPMAN

“It’s Too Late”
(Paradise Of Bachelors)

2.
SADE

“The Big Unknown”
(Sony)

3.
NORAH JONES

“Wintertime”
(Capitol Records)

4.
CORNELIA MURR

“Tokyo Kyoto”
(Autumn Tone Records)

5.
IAN DANIEL KEHOE

“Secret Republic”
(Tin Angel Records)

6.
DURAND JONES & THE INDICATIONS

“Don’t You Know [feat. Aaron Frazer”
(Dead Oceans/Colemine Records)

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7.
YOLA

“Ride In The Country”
(Easy Eye Sound)

8.
THE DECEMBERISTS

“Traveling On”
(Rough Trade)

9.
ONEOHTRIX POINT NEVER

“Last Known Image Of A Song [Ryuichi Sakamoto remix]
(Warp)

10.
GUIDED BY VOICES

“My Angel”
(www.RockathonRecords.com)

11.
CAT POWER

“What The World Needs Now”
(Domino Records)

12.
DANIEL KNOX

“The Poisoner [feat. Nina Nastasia]”
(H.P. Johnson Presents)

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The January 2019 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jack White on the cover. Inside, White heads up our Review Of The Year – which also features the best new albums, archive releases, films and books of the last 12 months. Aside from White, there are exclusive interviews with Paul Weller, Elvis Costello, Stephen Malkmus, Courtney Barnett, Low and Mélissa Laveaux. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best music of 2018.

The Lemonheads announce European tour

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The Lemonheads have announced a European tour in support of their new covers album Varshons 2, due for release on February 8.

Peruse the full list of tourdates below:

06 Feb: The Academy, Dublin, Ireland
07 Feb: Cyprus Avenue, Cork, Ireland
08 Feb: Elmwood Hall, Belfast, UK
09 Feb: SWG3, Glasgow, UK
11 Feb: Wylam Brewery, Newcastle, UK
12 Feb: O2 Ritz, Manchester, UK
13 Feb: Leeds University Stylus, Leeds, UK
14 Feb: Junction, Cambridge, UK
15 Feb: O2 Academy 2, Birmingham, UK
17 Feb: Engine Rooms, Southampton, UK
18 Feb: SWX, Bristol, UK
19 Feb: O2 Forum Kentish Town, London, UK

21 Feb: Tivoli Vredenburg Pandora, Utrecht, Netherlands
22 Feb: Rotondes, Luxembourg, Luxembourg
23 Feb: Mascotte, Zurich, Switzerland
24 Feb: Locomotiv, Bologna, Italy
26 Feb: Biko, Milan, Italy
27 Feb: Culture Factory, Zagreb, Croatia
28 Feb: Chelsea, Vienna, Austria
01 Mar: Ampere, Munich, Germany
03 Mar: SO36, Berlin, Germany
04 Mar: Pumpehuset, Copenhagen, Denmark
05 Mar: Blaa, Oslo, Norway
06 Mar: Nalen, Stockholm, Sweden
08 Mar: Molotow, Hamburg, Germany
09 Mar: Reflektor Club, Liege, Belgium
10 Mar: Gibus Club, Paris, France

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Tickets go on sale on Friday (December 7).

Today, the band released a second song from Varshons 2, a cover of The Bevis Frond’s “Old Man Blank”. Hear it below:

Hear another track from Varshons 2 and find out how to pre-order the album here.

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The January 2019 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jack White on the cover. Inside, White heads up our Review Of The Year – which also features the best new albums, archive releases, films and books of the last 12 months. Aside from White, there are exclusive interviews with Paul Weller, Elvis Costello, Stephen Malkmus, Courtney Barnett, Low and Mélissa Laveaux. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best music of 2018.

Jenny Lewis on her favourite music: “It’s pretty magical stuff”

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Originally published in Uncut’s Take 208.

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_______________

My dressing room soundtrack
The Durutti Column
Amigos Em Portugal
1983

I toured with The Postal Service last year, and in the dressing room we had a record player, and Jimmy [Tamborello] would go out in the town where we were and buy a bunch of records. Jimmy bought this, and we would listen to it backstage, before playing the Barclays Center and headlining Lollapalooza, all these monumental shows. I assumed that it was some sort of world music, but then when you find out it’s world music through this Manchester filter it’s really fucking cool.

_______________

An album that reminds me of my father
The War On Drugs
Lost In The Dream
2014

This record has been on constant rotation since it came out. My dad was from Philadelphia, and so although I’ve never lived in Philly I feel somewhat connected to Philly bands. My dad was in a comedy harmonica troupe. He got a start at a really famous harmonica school in Philadelphia, and initially learned how to play on a wax harmonica, so the legend goes. So whenever I listen to these Philly bands, I imagine a lonely harmonica solo off in the distance.

Christine & The Queens to headline new All Points East date

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Christine & The Queens have been unveiled as the latest headliners for the All Points East festival taking place in London’s Victoria Park in May/June next year.

Chris AKA Héloïse Letissier will be supported by on May 26 by Metronomy, Maribou State, Beach House, Kurt Vile & The Violators, Toro Y Moi, Ezra Collective, Baloji and more.

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Tickets go on sale at 9am on Friday (December 7) from here, priced £62.95 (general admission) or £109.95 (VIP).

All Points East have previously announced early lineups for May 24 and June 2, headlined by The Chemical Brothers and Bon Iver respectively.

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The January 2019 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jack White on the cover. Inside, White heads up our Review Of The Year – which also features the best new albums, archive releases, films and books of the last 12 months. Aside from White, there are exclusive interviews with Paul Weller, Elvis Costello, Stephen Malkmus, Courtney Barnett, Low and Mélissa Laveaux. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best music of 2018.

Win tickets to see Johnny Marr in London!

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As previously reported, Johnny Marr has added an intimate London date to the end of his current European tour. He’ll play new Hackney venue EartH on December 9.

We have five pairs of tickets to give away. All you have to do is answer the following question correctly and five winners will be chosen at random from the Uncut office hat.

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What is the name of Johnny Marr’s 2018 solo album?

a) Spiral Cities
b) Call The Comet
c) Adrenalin Baby

Send your answers to UncutComp@timeinc.com by Wednesday December 5.

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The January 2019 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jack White on the cover. Inside, White heads up our Review Of The Year – which also features the best new albums, archive releases, films and books of the last 12 months. Aside from White, there are exclusive interviews with Paul Weller, Elvis Costello, Stephen Malkmus, Courtney Barnett, Low and Mélissa Laveaux. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best music of 2018.

Doves announce first show in nine years for Teenage Cancer Trust

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Following a long hiatus, Doves have announced their first live date in nine years.

The Manchester band will headline the Royal Albert Hall on March 29 as part of the annual series of Teenage Cancer Trust shows at the historic London venue.

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Doves‘ official Twitter feed announced the news today, adding the line “More announcements to follow”, suggesting that a bigger tour and new material is in the works. Their last album was 2009’s Kingdom Of Rust.

Other acts playing the Royal Albert Hall in March as part of the Teenage Cancer Trust series include The Levellers, Take That and The Script.

Tickets go on sale at 9am on Friday (December 7) from here.

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The January 2019 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jack White on the cover. Inside, White heads up our Review Of The Year – which also features the best new albums, archive releases, films and books of the last 12 months. Aside from White, there are exclusive interviews with Paul Weller, Elvis Costello, Stephen Malkmus, Courtney Barnett, Low and Mélissa Laveaux. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best music of 2018.

The National, Florence + The Machine to play new BST Hyde Park date

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Florence + The Machine have been unveiled as the latest headliners for 2019’s Barclaycard Presents British Summer Time Hyde Park.

Florence Welch and her band will play London’s Hyde Park on Saturday July 13, supported by The National, Lykke Li, Khruangbin and Nadine Shah, with more acts to be announced.

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Tickets go on sale at 9am on Friday (December 7) from here. A Barclaycard presale is currently underway here.

Last week, BST Hyde Park 2019’s first headliners were revealed as Bob Dylan and Neil Young. The two musical giants will co-headline on July 12 – more details here.

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The January 2019 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jack White on the cover. Inside, White heads up our Review Of The Year – which also features the best new albums, archive releases, films and books of the last 12 months. Aside from White, there are exclusive interviews with Paul Weller, Elvis Costello, Stephen Malkmus, Courtney Barnett, Low and Mélissa Laveaux. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best music of 2018.

David Bowie – Glastonbury 2000

The afterlife of David Bowie is proving surprisingly rich. The ongoing Five Years boxsets, live albums, reissues, repressings, an EP of unreleased material. And now his 2000 Glastonbury headline performance – unseen and unreleased for 18 years. BBC producer Mark Cooper filmed the show in its entirely but was strictly limited by Bowie to a one-off live broadcast of just seven songs. Cooper calls it “surely his greatest concert since he buried Ziggy Stardust at Hammersmith in July 1973.”

Now, following years of negotiation, the full Glastonbury set finally makes its debut as a live DVD and album. Bowie was always oddly allergic to official concert films, even in his world-conquering prime. DA Pennebaker’s 1973 Ziggy feature only earned a full release after a decade of wrangling, while a full-length film of his 1978 Isolar II tour, directed by David Hemmings, has been sitting in limbo for decades. “I simply didn’t like the way it had been shot,” Bowie told Uncut in 2001. “Now, of course, it looks pretty good and I suspect it would make it out some time in the future.” That was 17 years ago. Keep watching this space.

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I witnessed this millennial Glastonbury show first hand. At the time, after numerous ’90s tours, seeing Bowie live did not feel like such a momentous event. But history has given this performance extra mythic weight, especially in the light of his abrupt retirement from touring just four years later. Revisiting it now in crisp BBC-filmed close-up, this bespoke two-hour banquet of wall-to-wall hits surpasses my shaky memory of it. There is scarcely a dud performance or a weak choice among these 21 tracks. It’s a godawful huge affair.

Sporting a technicolor dreamcoat designed by Alexander McQueen, his long blond hair crimped and swept into an asymmetrical swoosh, Bowie looks fabulous, preposterous and absurdly youthful for his 53 years. This striking androgynous look pays knowing homage to his 1971 Hunky Dory album, which coincided with his only ever previous appearance at the embryonic Glastonbury Fayre 29 years before. “I left my Bipperty-Bopperty hat there, in the farmhouse,” Bowie writes in the accompanying archive diary pieces included in this DVD package. “I wonder if it’s still on the chair? With my bottle of cannabis tincture?”

The career-spanning set-list draws heavily on this proto-glam period, with a generous side order of Station To Station. The band includes familiar lieutenants like avant-jazz pianist Mike Garson, latterday bass queen Gail Ann Dorsey and guitarist Earl Slick, returning to the Bowie family after more than 20 years away.

Slick channels his guitar-shredding younger self on the tensile, tightly wound funk-rocker “Stay” and the monumental prog-soul juggernaut of “Station To Station” itself, whose incantatory vocals and kabbalah-laced lyrics now sound like early blueprints for Blackstar. Another rich cut is “Golden Years”, with Bowie fully engaged as a vocal stylist, constantly tweaking the timbre and grain of his voice, teasing out new harmonies from ancient material.

Bowie’s ingratiating cockney-geezer shtick feels forced at first: “Glastonbury you’ve got a very, very lucky face!” But once the band start cooking with rollicking versions of “Changes”, “Life On Mars?”, “Starman” and more, he stops looking like an actor playing a rock star and relaxes into being the real thing. Four tracks in, he trades his eye-catching coat for a slightly less flamboyant charcoal-grey frock number. “I’m really hot and sweaty,” he grins. “I wore a stupid jacket, I’m too vain to take it off.”

A soaring take on “Absolute Beginners” and a swashbuckling “All The Young Dudes” whip Bowie up into a full-throated frenzy of preening. “The Man Who Sold The World” gets the same lusty treatment, with some gorgeous intertwined vocals in its fade-out section. Meanwhile, the band throw in a couple of false starts. Always a tricky prospect live, with a tendency to plod, “Heroes” opens as a gentle bluesy stroll before powering up into the shuddering edge-of-mania anthem it needs to be. Likewise, “Let’s Dance” begins as a breezy flamenco-pop ballad before that knife-sharp Nile Rodgers arrangement kicks in around the first chorus. The only real weakling here is a decaffeinated “Fame”, which sorely lacks the sour coke-hangover bite of its Lennon-assisted original.

Whatever Bowie’s objections to sharing this performance 18 years ago, they seem ill-conceived today. When it ends, he is on his knees, miming air guitar and bowing effusively to the Glastonbury crowd. He’s in the best-selling show. The greatest since he killed off Ziggy? Arguably, but certainly an autumnal peak.

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The January 2019 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – with Jack White on the cover. Inside, White heads up our Review Of The Year – which also features the best new albums, archive releases, films and books of the last 12 months. Aside from White, there are exclusive interviews with Paul Weller, Elvis Costello, Stephen Malkmus, Courtney Barnett, Low and Mélissa Laveaux. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best music of 2018.