Fat White Family announce UK tour

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Riding an unfamiliar wave of acclaim for their recent Serf’s Up album, Fat White Family have announced a UK tour for the autumn.

Check out the full list of dates below. Tickets go on sale on via their website at 10am on Friday (June 21).

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20/11/19 – Stylus – LEEDS
21/11/19 – Potterow – EDINBURGH
22/11/19 – QMU – GLASGOW
23/11/19 – Boilershop – NEWCASTLE
24/11/19 – Arts Centre – KENDAL
26/11/19 – Invisible Wind Factory – LIVERPOOL
27/11/19 – Tramshed – CARDIFF
28/11/19 – Institute – BIRMINGHAM
29/11/19 – The Haunt – BRIGHTON
02/12/19 – EartH Concert Hall – LONDON
03/12/19 – EartH Concert Hall – LONDON
04/12/19 – EartH Concert Hall– LONDON
05/12/19 – EartH Concert Hall- LONDON

Fat White Family have also shared a remix of Serf’s Up’s opening track “Feet” by Sheffield stalwarts Jarvis Cocker and Parrot (Crooked Man, All Seeing I, Forgemasters). Listen below:

The August 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from June 13, and available to order online now – with Bruce Springsteen on the cover. Inside, you’ll find The Rolling Stones, The Raconteurs, Woodstock, Black Sabbath, Beak>, Doves, Jimmy Cliff, Billy Childish, the Flamingo Club and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including The Black Keys, 75 Dollar Bill, House And Land, Trash Kit, Mega Bog and more.

Nick Cave & Warren Ellis’s The Road OST gets vinyl release

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Nick Cave & Warren Ellis’s soundtrack to John Hillcoat’s 2009 Cormac McCarthy adaptation The Road will be released on vinyl for the first time on August 2 via Mute/BMG.

It was the second time Cave and Ellis wrote the score for a John Hillcoat film, following 2005’s The Proposition, for which Cave himself write the screenplay.

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The Road: Original Film Score By Nick Cave & Warren Ellis
will be reissued on limited edition coloured vinyl in a gatefold sleeve. You can pre-order it here.

The August 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from June 13, and available to order online now – with Bruce Springsteen on the cover. Inside, you’ll find The Rolling Stones, The Raconteurs, Woodstock, Black Sabbath, Beak>, Doves, Jimmy Cliff, Billy Childish, the Flamingo Club and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including The Black Keys, 75 Dollar Bill, House And Land, Trash Kit, Mega Bog and more.

Peter Perrett – Humanworld

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Peter Perrett’s sudden, miraculous reappearance, back in 2017, with his first solo album proper, How The West Was Won, was one of the more surprising returns of recent times. He’d long stood, in popular music’s mythology, for peak ’70s excess – taking and selling drugs, addictive personality, wasted talent, decades of apparent non-achievement. It was particularly hard to take for fans given Perrett’s singular songwriting genius. His legend rests on the three albums he made in the late ’70s with The Only Ones, who were with, but not of, punk – the songs were too articulate and lovelorn, the musicianship too good, the sound a little too beholden to rock’s classic tropes, to really sit comfortably within punk’s purism.

But while their 1978 single “Another Girl, Another Planet” is always going to be Perrett’s classic, his entry into rock’s history books, listening back both to The Only Ones and their precursor, England’s Glory, you get a clearer, much more nuanced picture of Perrett. Equal parts consumptive poet and romantic tearaway, doomed and tragic but with a switchblade sense of humour, Perrett’s writing is remarkably full-blooded and fully formed – here’s someone who knows his way around a great melody and a set of lyrics that tell a story just so. It was every bit as evident during his short-lived ’90s comeback with The One, whose 1996 Woke Up Sticky is a masterclass of its kind, a bold and confident way to return to the fray.

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All that being said, it’s taken Perrett a good while to get back to his current form. An Only Ones reunion last decade had him going through the motions; he spent a bit of time hanging around with The Libertines, who might seem a little like kindred spirits. Perrett’s framed his recent return around opportunity and survival instinct kicking in, but even that can’t quite account for just how strong How The West Was Won was, how great it was to hear Perrett’s voice again – a slightly strained, clipped, colloquial instrument that’s still full of character, recognisable from the first lackadaisical syllable. (He has now lost that tense, uncomfortable tone he was singing with during the Only Ones reunion shows, too.)

The very welcome news, then, is that Humanworld is every bit as good as, and at points even better than, its predecessor, as though Perrett’s finally, almost five decades in, found his true métier. As with How The West Was Won, he’s making music with family, his sons Jamie and Peter Jr joining him on guitar and bass, and Jamie producing; there are other connections with the previous album, too, suggesting Perrett’s found another comfortable lineup to work with. They seem to fall in well with his songs, too – Perrett’s writing hasn’t changed too much over the years, a touch of Velvets simplicity here, some Stones swagger there, some hangover from glam’s most giddily reductive pop smarts, but that’s perfect grounding for a group to develop its collective psychology.

The album itself flies past – it’s brief, sharp, urgent, 12 songs clocking in at around 36 minutes, each song punched in and out with brittle economy. If some of the production touches expand the remit a little, with more backing vocals, more keyboards and synths filling in the sonic spectrum, some sharp, skirling viola from Jenny Maxwell winding between the other instruments, Perrett squeezes everything into perfect pop forms – “I Want Your Dreams” opens, an incessant pulse building, stealthily, steadily, cut brutally short for “Once Is Enough”’s tensile clatter and strum. In songs like this, Perrett’s gift is compressing all the drama of life’s ups and downs into simple, unpretentious pop.

Elsewhere, he’s as adept as ever at capturing blossoming romance, as on the beautiful “Heavenly Day”, which rides on a one-note arpeggio that’s pure John Cale in the Velvets, or Josephine Wiggs in The Perfect Disaster – indeed, it recalls the latter’s “TV (Girl On Fire)”, and The Perfect Disaster were one of the few groups over the past 30 years who truly understood what Perrett was trying to do with The Only Ones. Perrett’s recent turn to the political in the everyday is here, too, with “Believe In Nothing”’s scathing pessimism – “Blackest hole’s drawing us in/Bleakest future there’s ever been/It’s not a time of hope/Living is a joke” – and the fierce scepticism of “War Plan Red”.

At moments like this, Perrett skirts carefully around the edges of the dogmatic, never submitting to any tendency to proselytise. He’s clear-eyed, never losing the concise, plain-speaking poetry at the heart of his writing, which really, when it comes down to it, is the core of Humanworld – an everyday observational that pans out to capture 
the collective when need be.

The August 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from June 13, and available to order online now – with Bruce Springsteen on the cover. Inside, you’ll find The Rolling Stones, The Raconteurs, Woodstock, Black Sabbath, Beak>, Doves, Jimmy Cliff, Billy Childish, the Flamingo Club and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including The Black Keys, 75 Dollar Bill, House And Land, Trash Kit, Mega Bog and more.

Bill Callahan – Shepherd In A Sheepskin Vest

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Bill Callahan’s parents were national security operatives – language analysts; secrecy is in his blood. While he has produced a huge catalogue of supremely affecting music in the past 30 
years, Maryland’s master of minimalism could 
never be accused of oversharing. Over 17 albums – 
the first 11 as Smog, the latter six under his own name – the 52-year-old has developed an uncanny knack of speaking volumes by giving very little away, his songs an inscrutable mix of allegory, desert-dry humour and plausible personal deniability. The mildly prurient fascination in the indie community with his past romantic dalliances – with the late Cynthia Dall, 
’zine queen Lisa Crystal Carver, Chan Marshall (aka Cat Power) and Joanna Newsom – stemmed at least in part from how little he revealed about any of them.

Contrast that to the twinkly “Son Of The Sea” – one of the most immediately arresting songs on his first album in five years – where Callahan fills in his audience on exactly what he has been doing since the release of 2013’s amorous Dream River: “I got married, to my wife, she’s lovely, and I had a son.” This from a man who, when Uncut visited him at his home in Austin, Texas, five years ago, bridled at admitting to any new love in his life, and even hemmed and hawed over confessing – despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary – that he owned a bicycle.

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A kind of hand-whittled Astral Weeks shot through with therapy static, the 20-track Shepherd In A Sheepskin Vest is without doubt the most revealing record of Callahan’s uniquely uptight career; at times it documents his marriage to filmmaker-turned-psychotherapist Hanly Banks, and their life with toddler Bass (as in the fish, not to rhyme with “pace”) with luminous candour. He depicts the sounds of Sesame Street drifting through an open door to interrupt his reverie on the summer-love sensation “Confederate Jasmine” (“Grover counts to 50 in the other room sweetly forlorn,” he sings). Meanwhile, the one-time nightmare prowler of Smog’s 1997 anti-hit “Ex-Con” embraces suburban life with heavenly gratitude on “What Comes After Certainty”: “I never thought I’d make it this far, little old house, recent model car/And I’ve got the woman of my dreams, and an imitation Eames.”

However, if Callahan now 
has somewhere comfortable 
to sit, he does not rest easy. Shepherd In A Sheepskin Vest’s central concern is not domestic bliss, but what comes next; the need to be a grown-up, to resolve your own issues rather than leaving the next generation to deal with them. It’s also a much less expansive-sounding work than its immediate predecessors, 2011’s American apologia Apocalypse and the humid Dream River. Those records were cavernous, echo laden; this one is decidedly small scale. Callahan took the opportunity to overdub lots of tiny details onto these songs – plinky-plonk thumb pianos, New Age keyboards, ghostly washes of lap steel – but despite a substantial supporting cast, in the main it is just him and his guitar. That sense of returning to something simpler is evident from the start; opener “Shepherd’s Welcome” begins with the tell-tale tape hiss of Smog’s very first, straight-to-C60 recordings from the early 1990s. “It’s been such a long time, why don’t you come on in,” Callahan sings, nervously ushering in a former self.

Contentment has seemingly left Callahan wondering why he spent so long being unhappy. “The past never gave me anything but the blues,” he sings on “Young Icarus”, while he pokes a screwdriver into some more of his damaged 20-something wiring on the impish “The Ballad Of The Hulk”, questioning why he bottled up his feelings for so long. It’s a theme he returns to on the primary-coloured “Tugboats And Tumbleweeds”, a compendium of fatherly advice to his young son which Callahan told Uncut was also addressed to “baby Bill”. Have fun, he recommends, but know yourself, and – as he explains in a glorious tumbling verse that may be a veiled apology to past romantic partners – “Don’t let yourself get so blue that you make rash decisions for two/Else you’ll harm yourself and another who mistook you for a guide.”

The death of Callahan’s mother prompted further reflections. His songs have long hinted at a complicated relationship with his parents; the cruel father who dashes his son’s dreams 
in 1995’s “Bathysphere”, the exploded nuclear family depicted on 1997’s 
“Red Apple Falls”, the cold comforters 
of 2005’s “Rock Bottom Riser”. His mother’s passing clearly informs the cosmic arrivals and departures of airy fantasia “747” and his sonorous version 
of the traditional “Lonesome Valley”, 
as well as the ominous “When We Let Go”. The quiet, tender “Circles”, meanwhile, 
is a suitably restrained farewell to a 
parent who, as Callahan suggested 
to Uncut, might not have welcomed anything more showy.

However, if there is direct communication on Shepherd In A Sheepskin Vest, there is plenty of mystifying babble, too, 4am scratchings from Callahan’s dream diary. A Jungian analyst might be more useful than a lyric sheet in deciphering “The Black Dog On The Beach”, with transcendental hoe-down “Watch Me Get Married” anything but a peer at Callahan’s wedding snaps. The angry “Released” and the gloomy “Camels”, meanwhile, are unwieldy meldings of politics and philosophy that seem better suited to the outsider art of Callahan’s Smog years than his more professorial, Nick Cave-ish 2010s metier.

Quality control, though, doesn’t seem like Callahan’s main priority; having felt at one stage that fatherhood was the end of him as a writer (“Giving birth nearly killed me,” he half-jokes on “Son Of The Sea”), there is a sense – especially on the pretty “Writing” and the jugband chug of “Call Me Anything” – that he is just delighted that he 
is a functioning artist again. As a result, Shepherd In A Sheepskin Vest feels like a loosely curated splurge, art reflecting the messy realities of his new life.

However, for all of its cosmic positivity, and Callahan’s newfound sense of connectedness, it ends on a very unsettling note. Closer “The Beast” crawls from the light of boundless love toward an ominous darkness. A disembowelled approximation of “Good Morning, Captain” – the apocalyptic closing track on Slint’s post-rock monolith Spiderland – its gushing opening statement (“Sky change the sea, love changed me”) gives way to something altogether more troubling.

From the uplands of happiness, Callahan sees the gravestones in the valley below “look like teeth”; a shapeless, unnamed beast sleeps at his feet, but someday must wake. His voice takes an ominous turn in the final moments; always restrained, controlled, suddenly something is shifting. There is half an animal growl somewhere within as he intones the record’s final werewolf mantra: “Release beast, release beast, release beast.”

If Callahan has been domesticated, that untamed force still lurks within him. Parts of his soul have opened up to the universe on Shepherd In A Sheepskin Vest, but plenty of areas remain cordoned off, unknowable. This sprawling, beguiling collection strives to reveal all, but every answer brings more questions. One way or another, his chilly mystery persists; as Callahan puts it himself on “What Comes After Certainty”: “Though plain to see still hard to read.”

The August 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from June 13, and available to order online now – with Bruce Springsteen on the cover. Inside, you’ll find The Rolling Stones, The Raconteurs, Woodstock, Black Sabbath, Beak>, Doves, Jimmy Cliff, Billy Childish, the Flamingo Club and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including The Black Keys, 75 Dollar Bill, House And Land, Trash Kit, Mega Bog and more.

Jimmy Webb on Bruce Springsteen: “There’s no snobbery in him”

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The new issue of Uncut – in shops now or available to buy online by clicking here – includes an extensive report on the making of Bruce Springsteen’s bold new album Western Stars.

Back in 2017, Springsteen revealed that the album was “influenced by the Southern California pop music of the ’70s… Glen Campbell, Jimmy Webb, Burt Bacharach, those kinds of records. I don’t know if people will hear those influences, but that was what I had in my mind. It gave me something to hook an album around; 
it gave me some inspiration to write. And also, it’s a singer-songwriter record. It’s connected to my solo records writing-wise, more Tunnel Of Love and Devils And Dust, but it’s not like them at all. Just different characters living their lives.”

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Those aren’t the usual suspects when it comes to listing Springsteen’s influences, and he’s rarely, if ever, mentioned them before in interviews. So it’s surprising that he sounds so natural in this setting, that he’s able to thoroughly absorb those West Coast vibes into his music as a new frame for some of his most narrative songwriting in years.

When Uncut spoke to Jimmy Webb, the legendary songwriter admits he didn’t expect to ever be cited by Springsteen: “I had heard these rumours and thought, ‘Is it possible that this is true? This guy needs us like a migraine!’ I think it’s a very bold and admirable step, and it certainly shows that he’s connected with the ground. He’s planted down here with all of us. It shows there’s no snobbery in him.”

Webb is particularly with impressed Western Stars’ lead single “Hello Sunshine”, a lovely, gentle ode to those happy moments that never seem to last as long as you’d like. “You know I always liked my walking shoes/ But you can get a little too fond of the blues,” sings Springsteen, over a chugging-train snare pattern and a fluttering finger-picked guitar. “You fall in love with lonely/ You end up that way.”

It’s among the most revealing lyrics of Springsteen’s long career, a few lines that might unlock every song he’s ever written, and at least one way he has captured something integral to the Southern California pop music he’s emulating. “I was amazed at how he locked on to the sensual pleasure that can be derived from loneliness,” says Webb. “From what Warren Zevon used to call ‘splendid isolation’. And yet, at the same time, he’s recognising there’s a danger there. There’s a dark side. That lonely road has its appeal, but at the same time he’s cautioning you: don’t get too far out there as you might not be able to get back. That’s so intense and personal. The largesse of the artist in revealing that to the listener is amazing.”

You can read much about Bruce Springsteen and Western Stars in the new issue of Uncut, out now.

The August 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from June 13, and available to order online now – with Bruce Springsteen on the cover. Inside, you’ll find The Rolling Stones, The Raconteurs, Woodstock, Black Sabbath, Beak>, Doves, Jimmy Cliff, Billy Childish, the Flamingo Club and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including The Black Keys, 75 Dollar Bill, House And Land, Trash Kit, Mega Bog and more.

Lost Miles Davis album Rubberband set for release

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Miles Davis’s lost mid-’80s album Rubberband has been completed by its original producers and is now set for release on September 6.

Davis began work on the album soon after signing to Warners in 1985, but eventually the project was shelved in favour of 1986’s Tutu.

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Two tracks from the sessions were released on last year’s Rubberband EP for Record Store Day. Now the entire 11-track album has been completed by producers Randy Hall and Zane Giles, along with Davis’s nephew Vince Wilburn Jr, who played the drums on the original sessions. It features newly recorded vocals from Ledisi and Lalah Hathaway (daughter of Donny Hathaway).

Davis plays both trumpet and keyboards on the album. Other musicians include keyboardists Adam Holzman, Neil Larsen and Wayne Linsey, percussionist Steve Reid and saxophonist Glen Burris. The cover art is an original painting by Davis.

Check out the tracklisting for Rubberband below:

“Rubberband Of Life” – featuring Ledisi
“This Is It”
“Paradise”
“So Emotional” – featuring Lalah Hathaway
“Give It Up”
“Maze”
“Carnival Time”
“I Love What We Make Together” – featuring Randy Hall
“See I See”
“Echoes In Time/The Wrinkle”
“Rubberband”

The August 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from June 13, and available to order online now – with Bruce Springsteen on the cover. Inside, you’ll find The Rolling Stones, The Raconteurs, Woodstock, Black Sabbath, Beak>, Doves, Jimmy Cliff, Billy Childish, the Flamingo Club and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including The Black Keys, 75 Dollar Bill, House And Land, Trash Kit, Mega Bog and more.

Discogs reveals the UK’s 100 most expensive records

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Discogs has today published a list of the 100 most expensive records bought in the UK via its online marketplace.

Top of the charts is the original unreleased 7″ of Sex Pistols’ “God Save The Queen” on A&M, which sold for £12,500. It is believed that only nine copies exist.

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The top ten also includes ultra-rare editions of records by The Beatles, David Bowie and Pet Shop Boys, alongside cherished obscurities by Ferris Wheel and Billy Nicholls. Röyksopp’s 2002 album Melody AM also makes the upper reaches of the chart, thanks to a promo version that featured a Banksy stencil print on the sleeve.

Peruse the full Top 100 rundown here.

The August 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from June 13, and available to order online now – with Bruce Springsteen on the cover. Inside, you’ll find The Rolling Stones, The Raconteurs, Woodstock, Black Sabbath, Beak>, Doves, Jimmy Cliff, Billy Childish, the Flamingo Club and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including The Black Keys, 75 Dollar Bill, House And Land, Trash Kit, Mega Bog and more.

Reviewed! Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story By Martin Scorsese

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For anyone wondering what Bob Dylan thinks of Bob Dylan, you’re unlikely to find answers in Martin Scorsese’s excellent, playful new documentary. Asked to articulate his thoughts on the Rolling Thunder charabanc, Dylan looks momentarily perplexed then exasperated. “It was over 40 years ago,” he exclaims. “I wasn’t even born then!”

For Dylan, of course, the obsessive camouflaging of truths has been a career-long undertaking – and to an extent, Scorsese’s Netflix documentary is similarly obfuscatory. Subtitled a “Bob Dylan story”, the film weaves concert footage and contemporary interviews in with a handful of mischievous subplots. But mind, this is more than just a companion piece to the recent Rolling Thunder Revue: The 1975 Live Recordings set, or a boisterous cousin to the director’s 2005 documentary No Direction Home. It’s a three-dimensional, metatextual romp showing Dylan’s joyous excursion through the troubled heart of mid-’70s America. Freewheeling, in every sense.

The footage – much of it taken from Dylan’s impressionistic road movie Renaldo And Clara – is rich and varied. Here’s Dylan and Patti Smith, halfway up a staircase, talking about the universe during a party in Greenwich Village; there’s Joni Mitchell, Dylan and Roger McGuinn playing “Coyote” at Gordon Lightfoot’s house; there’s the full gang enjoying an excursion to Niagara Falls on a day off. Meanwhile, Allen Ginsberg acts as a kind of one-man Greek chorus for the proceedings, delivering idiosyncratic monologues to camera. Chaos is never far away.

But if your tolerance for watching semi-stoned musicians exchanging goofy bantz on the tour bus wears thin, no matter – the onstage footage presents different, more dynamic pleasures. A full-length version of “Isis” captures the tour’s seductive musical groove, with the band managing to somehow sound compellingly loose and tight at the same time, underpinned by Mick Ronson’s heavy, blocky chords.

To complement this archive material, Scorsese and Rosen have mustered an impressive cast list of survivors for contemporary perspective. Joan Baez is especially funny and forthright: “Did I have any reservations about going on the tour?” she asks rhetorically. “Have you ever been on the road with Bob Dylan?” It is lovely to see Sam Shepard – in an interviewed conducted a few years ago – while there are insights from McGuinn, Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, Rolling Stone writer Larry “Ratso” Sloman, boxer Ruben “Hurricane” Carter and others.

But all is not what it seems. We meet a European filmmaker who claims to have documented the tour. Then there is a Congressman who reveals deep connections between Dylan and Jimmy Carter. It all adds up to a lively dance between “what’s real and what is not”. Largely, though, these digressions add seasoning to the pot. They don’t even detract from the simple pleasure of watching Dylan, in the present day, at his most incorrigible. “Ramblin’ Jack Elliott?” he muses at one point. “He was a better sailor than a musician.” Which, perhaps, is as close to the truth as we’re going to get.

Follow me on Twitter @MichaelBonner

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

The August 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from June 13, and available to order online now – with Bruce Springsteen on the cover. Inside, you’ll find The Rolling Stones, The Raconteurs, Woodstock, Black Sabbath, Beak>, Doves, Jimmy Cliff, Billy Childish, the Flamingo Club and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including The Black Keys, 75 Dollar Bill, House And Land, Trash Kit, Mega Bog and more.

Details of Dr John’s final album revealed

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It’s been revealed that before his death from a heart attack last week, Dr John AKA Mac Rebennack completed a final album that is now poised for a posthumous release.

No title and release date has been confirmed as yet, but the album is described as a stripped-down, country-tinged effort featuring several Hank Williams and Johnny Cash covers, reworkings of Dr John classics “Such A Night” and “I Walk On Gilded Splinters”, and four brand new uptempo originals.

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The album features guest vocals from Willie Nelson, Rickie Lee Jones and Aaron Neville, who sings on a cover of the Traveling Wilburys’ “End Of The Line”.

Speaking to Rolling Stone, guitarist and producer Shane Theriot revealed that as Rebennack’s health declined, he was forced to finish recording the album at home, “Rick Rubin/Johnny Cash style… We took on a similar approach out of necessity.”

“Towards the beginning, I don’t think Mac realised it would probably be his last record, but towards the end, I think he knew,” said Theriot. “It would break my heart because he would come to my house, and I knew he wasn’t feeling great, and Mac’s work ethic, he was old school; he grew up doing five sets a night. And so he told me on several occasions, he would say, ‘Whatever we gotta do to finish this motherfucker, we gotta finish it.’

“There’s a version of ‘I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry’ that’ll make you cry when you hear Mac sing it,” continued Theriot. “As this record took shape, it wasn’t intentional, but the common thread is that the songs all deal with time and looking back. When you hear Mac sing, it’s somebody that’s lived a really full life. He sounds great, but he sounds exposed.”

The August 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from June 13, and available to order online now – with Bruce Springsteen on the cover. Inside, you’ll find The Rolling Stones, The Raconteurs, Woodstock, Black Sabbath, Beak>, Doves, Jimmy Cliff, Billy Childish, the Flamingo Club and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including The Black Keys, 75 Dollar Bill, House And Land, Trash Kit, Mega Bog and more.

Listen to 18 hours (!) of Radiohead’s OK Computer outtakes

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Last week, it emerged that 18 hours of unheard outtakes from Radiohead’s OK Computer sessions were being touted online by a bootlegger demanding $800 per track (or $150,000 for the entire set).

Today, Radiohead have responded by releasing all the material in question – originally archived by Thom Yorke on 18 minidiscs, dating from 1995-8 – on Bandcamp in aid of Extinction Rebellion.

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The minidiscs contain numerous demo, studio and live versions of the songs from OK Computer, as well as tracks originally left off the album, including “Lift” and “True Love Waits”.

Listen below, or go here to download the entire bundle for £18, with all proceeds going to Extinction Rebellion. The music will be available for the next 18 days.

“It’s not v interesting… there’s a lot of it,” wrote Yorke on Bandcamp. “As it’s out there it may as well be out there until we all get bored and move on.”

Posting on Twitter, his bandmate Jonny Greenwood added: “Never intended for public consumption (though some clips did reach the cassette in the OK Computer reissue) it’s only tangentially interesting. And very, very long. Not a phone download. Rainy out, isn’t it though?”

The August 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from June 13, and available to order online now – with Bruce Springsteen on the cover. Inside, you’ll find The Rolling Stones, The Raconteurs, Woodstock, Black Sabbath, Beak>, Doves, Jimmy Cliff, Billy Childish, the Flamingo Club and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including The Black Keys, 75 Dollar Bill, House And Land, Trash Kit, Mega Bog and more.

Tinariwen announce new album, Amadjar

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Trailblazing Tuareg rockers Tinariwen have revealed details of their ninth album, Amadjar, to be released by Wedge/PIAS on September 6.

It features Cass McCombs, Warren Ellis and Sunn 0)))’s Stephen O’Malley, among others. Hear “Taqkal Tarha”, featuring Micah Nelson of Promise Of The Real, below:

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The album was recorded by a mobile studio in late 2018 at a camp in the desert around Nouakchott, Mauritania, where the band were joined by griotte Noura Mint Seymali and her guitarist husband, Jeiche Ould Chigaly.

Once recorded, a host of Western musicians added instrumentation, including violin from Warren Ellis, mandolin and charango courtesy of Micah Nelson, and guitars from Stephen O’Malley, Cass McCombs and Rodolphe Burger.

Watch an album teaser below:

Pre-order Amadjar here and check out Tinariwen’s European tour dates below:

19.06.19 – Paradiso – AMSTERDAM
21.06.19 – ESSAOURIA, MOROCCO
26.06.19 – Plissken Festival – ATHENS
28.06.19 – Klub Studio – KRAKOW
29.06.19 – Progesja – WARSAW

01.07.19 – Dance Festival – MONS
02.07.19 – Tri-p Festival – MILAN
03.07.19 – Villa Ada – ROME
13.07.19 – Belgrave Music Hall – LEEDS
14.07.19 – Citadel Festival – LONDON
16.07.19 – Galway Festival – GALWAY

16.10.19 – Le Figuier Blanc – ARGENTEUIL
17.10.19 – Theatre De Cornouailles – QUIMPER
19.10.19 – La Barakason – NANTES
20.10.19 – La Sirene – LA ROCHELLE
22.10.19 – Big Band Café – HEROUILLE (CAEN)
23.10.19 – Casino De Paris – PARIS
25.10.19 – Hall de Paris Place Recollets -MOISSAC
24.10.19 – La Radiant – LYON
26.10.19 – Trix – ANTWERP
27.10.19 – Het Depot – LOUVEN
28.10.19 – Amager Bio – COPENHAGEN
29.10.19 – Aarhus Train – AARHUS
30.10.19 – Zhaak – DUSSELDORF
31.10.19 – Festsaal Kreuzberg – BERLIN

02.11.19 – Cosmopolite – OSLO
03.11.19 – Goteborgs Symfoniker – GOTHENBURG
04.11.19 – Slaktkyrkan – STOCKHOLM
10.11.19 – Les Docks – LAUSANNE
11.11.19 – Olympia – DUBLIN
12.11.19 – Trinity – BRISTOL
13.11.19 – Manchester Cathedral – MANCHESTER
14.11.19 – EaRTH – LONDON

The July 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from May 16, and available to order online now – with The Black Keys on the cover. Inside, you’ll find David Bowie, The Cure, Bruce Springsteen, Rory Gallagher, The Fall, Jake Xerxes Fussell, PP Arnold, Screaming Trees, George Harrison and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including PJ Harvey, Peter Perrett, Black Peaches, Calexico And Iron & Wine and Mark Mulcahy.

Bruce Springsteen, The Rolling Stones, The Raconteurs, Woodstock and more star in the new Uncut

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‘‘It was a chance to see if we could create the kind of world for which we’d been striving throughout the ’60s. That would be our political statement – proving that peace and understanding were possible and creating a testament to the value of the counterculture.” Welcome, then, to the new issue of Uncut, in shops from Thursday, June 13 and available to buy now.

That’s Michael Lang, organiser of Woodstock, reflecting on the ideals and motivations behind his legendary three-day festival as it celebrates its 50th anniversary. Such anniversaries, of course, are a critical motor for both the music industry at large and also for magazines such as Uncut. This month alone, in our Archive reviews section, you’ll find various anniversary editions under the spotlight, from Sigur Rós (2oth) to Ian Dury (40th) and The Grateful Dead (5oth). For Lang and the festival’s photographer Henry Diltz, though, they gratifyingly still see the spirit of Woodstock prevailing to the present day: “Woodstock didn’t signal the end of hippies,” says Diltz. “They went on to have kids and grandkids, so that whole movement is still alive in the form of people wanting to save the animals and the environment, with organisations like Greenpeace. That’s all part of the hippie generation.”

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There is another milestone, of sorts, in our cover story as Stephen Deusner takes a long and deep trip into Bruce Springsteen’s first studio album in five years, Western Stars. A bold, big-hearted record, its dusty tales of movie stuntmen, wayfarers and desert denizens all feature a sense of yearning for human connection; a wish to “get to that place where we really wanna go” that Springsteen has been singing about since “Born To Run”. That Western Stars is released – finally – just a few months before Springsteen turns 70 adds an extra level of pathos to Stephen’s excellent piece, which includes the sobering thought: “At this stage in your life, you give up your dreams of immortality.”

Meanwhile, on another trip entirely, and with a little help from Mick, Keith and Bill, we celebrate the colourful hijinks perpetrated by rock’s most illustrious grandees at The Rolling Stones’ Rock And Roll Circus; John Robinson heads to Bristol for a seriously funny encounter with BEAK>; and Peter Watts reopens the doors on the infamous Flamingo Club for some proper old-school R&B shenanigans. Elsewhere, you’ll find Jimmy Cliff, Black Sabbath, Rickie Lee Jones, The Raconteurs, Doves, R.E.M., Billy Childish and The Raincoats, as well as a wealth of new music from Trash Kit, Mega Bog, 75 Dollar Bill and House And Land.

What else? Our free, 15-track CD contains a carefully curated selection of the best current music – including David Berman’s mighty Purple Mountains, The Black Keys, Allah-Las, The Flaming Lips and Lloyd Cole, among other gems. As I mentioned last month, 2019 is turning into a vintage year for new music. In the next issue, there’ll be more on one of my favourite albums of the year…

Follow me on Twitter @MichaelBonner

The August 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from June 13, and available to order online now – with Bruce Springsteen on the cover. Inside, you’ll find The Rolling Stones, The Raconteurs, Woodstock, Black Sabbath, Beak>, Doves, Jimmy Cliff, Billy Childish, the Flamingo Club and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including The Black Keys, 75 Dollar Bill, House And Land, Trash Kit, Mega Bog and more.

Bob Dylan’s best friend Louie Kemp to publish memoir

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Bob Dylan’s friend Louie Kemp has announced that his memoir Dylan & Me: 50 Years Of Adventures will be published on August 15.

Kemp first befriended Dylan at Jewish summer camp in the early ’50s; they lost touch when Dylan moved to New York in 1961 but reconnected in the early ’70s, with Kemp subsequently invited to produce the Rolling Thunder Revue tour.

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Kemp was encouraged to write Dylan & Me: 50 Years Of Adventures by fellow Rolling Thunder alumnus Kinky Friedman, who also provides the book’s introduction.

He has chosen to self-publish the memoir after a deal with a publisher fell through. “They kept asking me to write about things that I didn’t think were pertinent,” Kemp told Rolling Stone. “All the stories I’m willing to share in this book are stories that don’t violate our friendship. They are stories that show the human side of Bob. They make him look like one of the boys… To me, he has always been Bobby Zimmerman and these are all Bobby Zimmerman stories. Bob Dylan is his commercial side. I wanted to show a totally different perspective on him than anyone has ever heard before.”

You can pre-order Dylan & Me: 50 Years Of Adventures and read an extract from the book here.

The July 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from May 16, and available to order online now – with The Black Keys on the cover. Inside, you’ll find David Bowie, The Cure, Bruce Springsteen, Rory Gallagher, The Fall, Jake Xerxes Fussell, PP Arnold, Screaming Trees, George Harrison and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including PJ Harvey, Peter Perrett, Black Peaches, Calexico And Iron & Wine and Mark Mulcahy.

Uncut – August 2019

Bruce Springsteen, The Rolling Stones, Black Sabbath and Doves all feature in the new issue of Uncut, in shops from June 13 and available to buy from our online store.

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN: In this month’s cover story, we dig deep into the making of Springsteen’s new album Western Stars, speaking to some of The Boss’s closest confidants as well as the musicians who helped realise this stunning record. “At this stage in your life, you give up your dreams of immortality,” we learn…

NEW MUSIC CD: Our free 15-track CD features a splendid selection of brand new platters from The Black Keys, The Flaming Lips, Purple Mountains, Lloyd Cole, Mega Bog, 75 Dollar Bill, Allah-Las, Jade Jackson and more.

Plus! Inside the new issue you’ll find…

THE ROLLING STONES: Roll up! Roll up! The inside story of their Rock’n’Roll Circus, when a cavalcade of big-hitting rock stars – Lennon! Clapton! Jethro Tull! – enjoyed a rare moment of cultural harmony amid a cast of fire-eaters, beautiful freaks and a boxing kangaroo…

WOODSTOCK: We revisit the 1969 festival in the company of official photographer Henry Diltz, who shares some of his favourite images of the epochal event – some unseen for years – alongside hair-raising stories of how they pulled it all off, brown acid and all.

BEAK>: To Bristol, to discuss the Wurzels, soup and brilliant music with Geoff Barrow’s electro-rock trio.

BLACK SABBATH: With a new exhibition opening in Birmingham, Tony Iommi basks in hometown glory and sheds some light on his more outré wardrobe choices: “It was a bit of an outrageous time, the ’70s…”

JIMMY CLIFF: The reggae pioneer recalls eventful encounters with Bob Marley, Fela Kuti and Jimi Hendrix.

DOVES: The Manchester trio discuss the making of their skyscraping epic – and unlikely Top 3 hit – “There Goes The Fear”.

BILLY CHILDISH: The ‘Wild’ man of back-to-basics garage rock takes on the tricky task of navigating his own bulging back catalogue.

THE FLAMINGO CLUB: Pete Townshend, Kenney Jones and many others share tales of groovy spirits and rave ups in the fabled swinging London hotspot.

We review new albums by The Flaming Lips, The Raconteurs, Willie Nelson, Trash Kit and more; plus archive releases from Norma Tanega, Brian Eno and Sigur Rós; while Public Enemy and The Strokes are caught live.

Plus there are illuminating new interviews with Rickie Lee Jones, Milton Nascimento and The Raincoats, we bid farewell to The Borderline (with help from R.E.M and others) welcome Mega Bog and ponder a universe without The Beatles

THE NEW UNCUT IS ON SALE FROM THURSDAY, JUNE 13; CLICK HERE TO HAVE A COPY DELIVERED DIRECT TO YOUR DOOR

Send us your questions for Ty Segall

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It’s about time we had a new Ty Segall album. After all, it’s at least two months since frenzied live effort Deforming Lobes hit the shelves, and he needs to pull his finger out if he wants to match the total of five albums he released in 2018, whether solo, in cahoots with White Fence, or as a member of various bands including Fuzz, Gøggs and The CIA.

First Taste – due out on August 1 via Drag City – continues a rich vein of form for the Californian garage-rock kingpin, picking up where Uncut’s No. 3 album of 2018, Freedom’s Goblin, left off.

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Watch a video for the track “Taste”, in which Segall murders his fellow Freedom Band members, below:

Hopefully he evades the authorities for long enough to answer your questions, for an upcoming Audience With Ty Segall. So what do you want to ask the tireless singer/multi-instrumentalist/producer/scene-leader, the man who’s made more albums over the last decade than you’ve had disappointing pre-packed sandwiches?

Email your questions to us at uncutaudiencewith@ti-media.com by Wednesday June 12 and Ty will answer the best ones in a future issue of Uncut.

The July 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from May 16, and available to order online now – with The Black Keys on the cover. Inside, you’ll find David Bowie, The Cure, Bruce Springsteen, Rory Gallagher, The Fall, Jake Xerxes Fussell, PP Arnold, Screaming Trees, George Harrison and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including PJ Harvey, Peter Perrett, Black Peaches, Calexico And Iron & Wine and Mark Mulcahy.

Hear Bat For Lashes’ new single, “Kids In The Dark”

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Natasha Khan AKA Bat For Lashes has announced that her new album Lost Girls will be released by AWAL Recordings on September 6.

Listen to the first single, “Kids In The Dark”, below:

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As with several previous Bat For Lashes albums, Lost Girls is loosely based around the story of a fictional protagonist/alter-ego, here called Nikki Pink. A press release describes it as “a homage to Los Angeles where the album was recorded, to being a kid in the ’80s”.

The July 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from May 16, and available to order online now – with The Black Keys on the cover. Inside, you’ll find David Bowie, The Cure, Bruce Springsteen, Rory Gallagher, The Fall, Jake Xerxes Fussell, PP Arnold, Screaming Trees, George Harrison and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including PJ Harvey, Peter Perrett, Black Peaches, Calexico And Iron & Wine and Mark Mulcahy.

Neil Young + Stray Gators – Tuscaloosa

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Neil Young is an artist who prizes passion over polish, raw power over perfect technique. But there’s something about 1973’s Time Fades Away that has always cut too close to the bone even for him. “I think it’s the worst record I ever made,” he told Dave Ferrin in 1987. Recorded live in America during early ’73 (but made up of entirely new songs), the album should’ve been a triumph for Neil; it came on the heels of the songwriter’s chart-topping blockbuster Harvest.

With “Heart Of Gold” and “Old Man” breezing across the airwaves, Young was suddenly able to fill huge stadiums and arenas on his own, without the help of C, S or N. But the sudden death in November 1972 of Crazy Horse guitarist Danny Whitten looms over Time Fades Away (and, of course, the grief-stricken Tonight’s The Night, which was recorded later in ’73) and as a consequence, it seemed as though Young would rather let Time Fades Away just fade away.

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So that’s why Tuscaloosa, the 11th release in the songwriter’s ongoing archival Performance Series, comes as a bit of a surprise. Uncovered by engineer John Hanlon late last year, the rich, crystal-clear recording captures Neil with the Stray Gators down in Alabama early on during the Time Fades Away tour. So impressed was Young with Hanlon’s find that he apparently postponed the release of Odeon-Budokan – a prized Crazy Horse-era live set from 1976 – in favour of this.

It’s certainly a revelatory listen, giving us a fuller picture of what Young was up to onstage at this crucial turning point in his career. It’s a fan-friendly set, with faithful renditions of “Heart Of Gold”, “After The Gold Rush”, “Out On The Weekend” and other favourites complementing the fresher material. And though audience tapes from the tour sometimes show Young in a cranky, confrontational mood, he’s easygoing and wry here, cracking jokes between songs and making light of his newfound commercial success (Neil introduces “Heart Of Gold” as “Burger Of Gold”). Think of Tuscaloosa as Time Fades Away’s kinder, gentler cousin. But don’t worry – it’s still got plenty of bite.

And speaking of bite – Tuscaloosa is a sparkling showcase for the Stray Gators, who appear on all but the first two tracks, solo acoustic numbers. Made up of pedal steel/slide guitar maestro Ben Keith, pianist Jack Nitzsche, drummer Kenny Buttrey and bassist Tim Drummond, the group was one of Young’s subtlest, most sensitive combos, blending session-player expertise with a deliciously stoney looseness.

Tuscaloosa is further distinguished from Time Fades Away since it features Buttrey – Young replaced him with the harder-hitting Johnny Barbata later in the tour. Whatever his boss’s complaints may have been at the time, Buttrey, one of country rock’s primary rhythmic architects, is terrific here, his in-the-pocket groove giving even the slowest songs an added buoyancy. And he’s certainly capable of thunderous stadium-ready playing; his powerful fills on a fiery “Alabama” (an inevitable, but still bold, choice to play in Tuscaloosa) leave the studio version in the dust.

Ben Keith is also a vital part of Tuscaloosa’s overall success, his liquid lines connecting the Stray Gators’ sound to a classic Nashville heritage, but also giving the band a spaced-out, wide-open flavour at times. Like Buttrey, Young had first hooked up with the multi-instrumentalist during the initial Harvest sessions, and Keith would become a constant companion both live and in the studio until his death in 2010. The chemistry between Young and Keith is already readily apparent at this early stage in the relationship, whether the pair is trading spicy riffs on a rollicking “Lookout Joe” or harmonising raggedly on an electric/electrifying “New Mama” (which would later show up in acoustic guise on Tonight’s The Night).

Although technically they were only in existence for two years – from 1971–1973 – the Stray Gators became a critical part of Young’s story. Young’s first band since the Whitten-era Crazy Horse collapsed, they help Young bridge the gap between the Horse’s early glories and the reflective, expansive music he made on On The Beach and Tonight’s The Night.

Complaints? Well, as is Young’s usual MO, Tuscaloosa is only a sampling of the set Neil and the Stray Gators played on this particular evening. Unlike the Grateful Dead, Springsteen or Dylan, Young remains resistant to releasing complete shows, making it still necessary to seek out murky bootlegs. Nevertheless, Tuscaloosa is an incredibly valuable document of Neil Young in 1973, battling his demons in front of thousands and delivering some of his most deeply felt music.

The record comes hot on the heels of two other mid-’70s archival efforts – Songs For Judy and Roxy: Tonight’s The Night Live – and it’s a blessing that Neil is finally letting fans hear this buried treasure from one of his peak periods, rather than moving forward and resolutely defying expectations in his usual way. Can the man’s ultimate lost album, 1975’s Homegrown, be far behind? Maybe – but likely not before the just-announced new Crazy Horse LP lands this autumn.

The July 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from May 16, and available to order online now – with The Black Keys on the cover. Inside, you’ll find David Bowie, The Cure, Bruce Springsteen, Rory Gallagher, The Fall, Jake Xerxes Fussell, PP Arnold, Screaming Trees, George Harrison and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including PJ Harvey, Peter Perrett, Black Peaches, Calexico And Iron & Wine and Mark Mulcahy.

Deluxe Ultimate Music Guide: Oasis

Chill out, the goods have arrived!
With Definitely Maybe celebrating its 25th anniversary, we present the deluxe updated edition of the Ultimate Music Guide to Oasis.
This supernova edition includes the band’s most outrageous interviews, new writing on Liam and Noel solo, last words from Liam – and his life in pictures.
In shops from next week and online here now.
Mega!

Bob Dylan – The Rolling Thunder Revue: The 1975 Live Recordings

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After the lonely crafting of Blood On The Tracks, Bob Dylan evidently needed company and collaboration. The summer of 1975 found him propping up bars with old cronies in Greenwich Village, making surprise appearances at the clubs where he’d made his name. He was also writing Desire and talking about going back on the road. Tour ’74 with The Band had been an unhappy trip. What he was thinking about now was more like a circus, maybe one of those travelling carnivals he writes about so fondly in Chronicles.

The romantic notion was to turn up somewhere unannounced, play a small club, split for the next gig. He put together a 10-piece band who called themselves Guam, rounded up some old friends – Bobby Neuwirth, Roger McGuinn, Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, Allen Ginsberg, Joan Baez. Dylan called it The Rolling Thunder Revue and it hit the road on October 30, 1975 at the War Memorial Auditorium in Plymouth, Massachusetts.

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The Rolling Thunder back-story became so quickly fabled, the music made on the tour consequently seemed neglected, like a relative locked in an attic, talked about but never visited. It was 2002 before Dylan assented to The Bootleg Series Vol 5: Bob Dylan Live 1975, The Rolling Thunder Revue. It was a thrilling album. But its 22 tracks offered barely a hint of the musical booty fans were sure was out there, some of it tantalisingly heard in Renaldo & Clara, the film shot in tandem with the tour.

More of that will presumably appear in Rolling Thunder Revue, A Bob Dylan Story By Martin Scorsese, which Scorsese has assembled from the hundreds of hours of film accumulated by Dylan and his crew, to which The Rolling Thunder Revue: The 1975 Live Recordings is billed as a companion piece.

It’s a 14CD boxset, three discs of rehearsals, 10 discs of the five shows professionally recorded in their entirety and a final disc of rarities. The two CDs from SIR Rehearsals in New York find Dylan in what might be described as his element. Which is to say, at the centre of a certain amount of chaos. His approach to rehearsal is at best relaxed, if not entirely whimsical. There’s no obvious instruction, clarification of key, tempo or other apparently frivolous irrelevancies. Dylan seems happy enough to play the first thing that comes into his head – “People Get Ready”, “Lily, Rosemary And The Jack Of Hearts” – and leave it to the other musicians to somehow find their own way to fit in. The eight tracks on CD 3 were recorded on October 29 at the Seacrest Motel in Massachusetts and are effectively the revue’s final dress rehearsal. Several songs are still looking for arrangements, including “Hurricane”.

The first concerts ran to five hours, Dylan on stage for a little more than an hour. The shows had the same nightly format. Following an opening set by Guam and solo spots from McGuinn, Joni Mitchell, Ronee Blakley and Ramblin’ Jack, an unannounced Dylan strolled on stage, singing “When I Paint My Masterpiece”. He usually played the same six or seven tunes, mixing songs from Desire, still unreleased when the tour started, “Tangled Up In Blue”, more rarely “Shelter From The Storm”, and some older big-hitters, revisited in unpredictable ways.

On Tour ’74, he often sounded like a man trying to make himself heard in an air raid. There’s no greater evidence here of the mercurial phrasings of the 1966 world tour, and several times he sounds as if he’s halfway to turning into Joe Strummer, especially on livid versions of “The Lonesome Death Of Hattie Carroll”. At least he’s absolutely engaged again with his own songs, even if fans struggled to recognise some of his fearless reinventions, something they’d have to get used to in years to come. The version on Disc 13 of “Tonight I’ll Be Staying Here With You”, for instance, has a completely rewritten lyric and a careening new arrangement. It sounds like a room being ransacked. “Just Like A Woman” becomes increasingly theatrical in these performances. Dylan and Guam put a bomb under the revered “A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall”, transforming it into a barnstorming roadhouse rocker, like something off Morrison Hotel.

After a brief interval, the curtain went up on a startling sight. Dylan and Baez sharing a microphone, as if it were Newport ’63. For all the sense their voices make together, though, Dylan may as well have been duetting with Damo Suzuki. When they actually sound as if they’re singing the same song, there are wonderful moments, not least “I Dreamed I Saw St Augustine” stunningly recast as a cantina ballad. Baez had a solo slot before Dylan returned for increasingly thunderous takes on songs from Desire, including versions of “Sara” as much blackmail notes as love song. The shows always wrapped with Woody Guthrie’s “This Land Is Your Land”, preceded by “Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door”, fabulous in every iteration, each with a bespoke lyric.

All the music on The 1975 Live Recordings is from the first leg of the tour. There was a second in April 1976, dates in the South, poorly attended, although by then Desire was a No 1 album. Dylan played the shows to recoup some of the money he’d poured into Renaldo & Clara. His mood was sour. Songs from Blood On The Tracks replaced the numbers from Desire and his performances were wrathful, apocalyptic. One of them, at Fort Collins, Colorado, on a cold, wet day, was filmed for a TV special. You can only hope the tapes are already on their way to Martin Scorsese.

The July 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from May 16, and available to order online now – with The Black Keys on the cover. Inside, you’ll find David Bowie, The Cure, Bruce Springsteen, Rory Gallagher, The Fall, Jake Xerxes Fussell, PP Arnold, Screaming Trees, George Harrison and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including PJ Harvey, Peter Perrett, Black Peaches, Calexico And Iron & Wine and Mark Mulcahy.