Ride: “There were no rules to follow”

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The current issue of Uncut – in shops now or available to buy online by clicking here – features an Album By Album interview with dreamy Oxford rockers Ride.

The band look back on all their long-players, from early compilation Smile to latest effort This Is Not A Safe Place. However, it’s their kaleidoscopic second album Going Blank Again that we’ve selected as our ‘Uncut Classic’.

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A free-flowing triumph, incorporating many different styles and yielding the towering Top 10 hit “Leave Them All Behind”, Ride reveal how it was made:

ANDY BELL:
This was written and recorded in a residential studio in Chipping Norton. We had six weeks there, with catering and a big keg so we could drink draft beer at will from a big free barrel. There was this big bowl of eggs that really concerned me, because it was like, “How do you know when these eggs are going off?” No, it didn’t affect my performance too much!

MARK GARDENER: This was one of the most enjoyable recording processes we’ve had. We weren’t locked away in a dark London studio, and we were only 25 minutes from Oxford too, so I could go and buy pot! We felt confident about where the band was going. I remember going up to bed with the “Time Machine” instrumental on a cassette just going round and round, and putting words down to it there and then. It was a fresh, reactive way of working.

LOZ COLBERT: There was a lovely routine and rhythm to it that just went on day after day after day. Everyone had space. It was a great studio, and it was nice working with Alan [Moulder, producer]. We had big charts up on the wall, “Things To Do”. I loved all that!

GARDENER: With “Leave Them All Behind”, we were mucking around with chopping up this Hammond recording, and it worked really well with the way the song evolved through jamming. Lyrically, I was inspired by our first American tour.

STEVE QUERALT: It felt like we’d almost established ourselves so that there were no rules to follow – we didn’t have to do a ’gazy album, we didn’t have to have the guitars up full.

BELL: We absolutely weren’t going to do that. We had all these tracks that were conceptual, like “Motorway Madness”, which was like “Drive Blind”’s noisy bit part two. We did some Abbey Road-style medley things and some of it got used at the beginning of “OX4”. There was “King Bullshit”, this ambient reggae thing with an AR Kane vibe that ended up as a part of “Time Machine”. They were all tracks 
that had their own qualities but we ended up squashing loads of them together. It was all based on the Beatles model: it felt like we had to progress, and make our albums all develop from the last one. That’s why we ended up painting ourselves into a corner.

You can read Ride’s take on the rest of their discography in the current issue of Uncut, out now with The Who on the cover.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Primal Scream to headline Peaky Blinders festival in Birmingham

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To coincide with the fifth series of BBC’s retro mob drama, the first ever Peaky Blinders festival will take place in Digbeth, Birmingham, on September 14 and 15.

Music comes from Primal Scream, Anni Calvi – who’s written the score for the new series – Slaves and Nadine Shah.

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The festival has been curated by Peaky Blinders creator Steven Knight, who will appear in a live Q&A alongside members of the cast. It also features a contemporary dance commission performed by Rambert, poetry slams, catwalk shows and “an immersive recreation of the Peaky Blinders world”.

Tickets go on sale at 10am next Friday (August 9) from here.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Angel Olsen announces new album, All Mirrors

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Angel Olsen has announced that her new album All Mirrors will be released by Jagjaguwar on October 4.

Watch a video for the title track below:

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Explains Olsen, “I chose this one as the title because I liked the theme: the theme of how we are all mirrors to and for each other. Even if that is not all of it, there is always an element of projection in what we’d like to see in people and scenarios and in the way we see ourselves in those scenarios, with those people.”

All Mirrors was originally planned as dual record release, featuring both solo and full band versions of the same songs. She recorded the solo version with Michael Harris in Anacortes, Washington and the fleshed-out version with producer John Congleton, arranger Jherek Bischoff, multi-instrumentalist/arranger/pre-producer Ben Babbitt, and a 14-piece orchestra.

While remaking the album with full production and new collaborators, Olsen realised she “needed to separate these two records and release All Mirrors in its heaviest form… It was impossible for me to deny how powerful and surprising the songs had become. The truth is that I may have never allowed this much sonic change in the first place had I not already made an account of the same songs in their purest form.”

Olsen has also announced a UK tour for early 2020. Peruse the tourdates below and buy tickets here.

23 Jan – Lisbon, PT @ Capitólio
24 Jan – Porto, PT @ Hard Club
25 Jan – Madrid, ES @ Sala BUT
26 Jan – Barcelona, ES @ Sala Razzmatazz
28 Jan – Geneva, CH @ Festival Antigel
29 Jan – Munich, DE @ Kammerspiele
30 Jan – Berlin, DE @ Huxleys Neue Welt
31 Jan – Copenhagen, DK @ Vega
1 Feb – Oslo, NO @ Rockefeller
3 Feb – Stockholm, SE @ Vasateatern
4 Feb – Gothenburg, SE @ Pustervik
5 Feb – Hamburg, DE @ Gruenspan
6 Feb – Amsterdam, NL @ Paradiso
7 Feb – Antwerp, BE @ De Roma
8 Feb – Paris, FR @ La Cigale
10 Feb – Bristol, UK @ SWX
11 Feb – London, UK @ Eventim Apollo
13 Feb – Manchester, UK @ O2 Ritz
14 Feb – Glasgow, UK @ Barrowland Ballroom

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

The Kinks unveil Arthur 50th anniversary box set

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The Kinks have revealed details of the 50th Anniversary reissue packages for their 1969 album Arthur Or The Decline And Fall Of The British Empire, to be released by BMG on October 25.

The deluxe box set features 88 tracks across four CDs, including five unreleased tracks and 26 unreleased versions. Listen to one of those unreleased tracks, “The Future”, below:

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

Also included are demos, alternate tracks, BBC sessions, new ‘doo-wop choir’ recordings and The Great Lost Dave Davies Solo Album, originally recorded in the midst of the Arthur sessions.

“One of the reasons the album wasn’t finished was because I felt The Kinks’ management and record company were forcing me too much,” says Dave Davies. “I felt very comfortable being in The Kinks and it seemed fulfilling to be part of a band. I didn’t really want for more. I couldn’t see the point.”

Ray Davies adds: “Hearing Dave’s songs again after all this time, I found them quite moving because they were like the backstory of what The Kinks were going through at the time.”

The new deluxe edition of Arthur also includes a 68-page book, a badge and four 7” singles – “Drivin’”, “Victoria”, “Shangri-La” and “Hold My Hand” – all reproduced with original international artwork. There are also standard 2xLP, 2xCD and digital versions available.

Pre-order the Arthur reissue here and check out the deluxe edition tracklisting below:

DISC ONE
ORIGINAL STEREO ALBUM, 2019 REMASTER

1. Victoria (Stereo)
2. Yes Sir, No Sir (Stereo)
3. Some Mother’s Son (Stereo)
4. Drivin’ (Stereo)
5. Brainwashed (Stereo)
6. Australia (Stereo)
7. Shangri-La (Stereo)
8. Mr. Churchill Says (Stereo)
9. She’s Bought A Hat Like Princess Marina (Stereo)
10. Young And Innocent Days (Stereo)
11. Nothing To Say (Stereo)
12. Arthur (Stereo)
Bonus Tracks
13. Plastic Man (Stereo)
14. Victoria (Alternate Stereo Mix)
15. Yes Sir, No Sir (Alternate Stereo Mix)
16. Drivin’ (Alternate Stereo Mix)
17. Brainwashed (Alternate Stereo Mix)
18. Australia (Alternate Stereo Mix)
19. Shangri-La (Alternate Stereo Mix)

DISC TWO
ORIGINAL MONO ALBUM, 2019 REMASTER

1. Victoria (Mono)
2. Yes Sir, No Sir (Mono)
3. Some Mother’s Son (Mono)
4. Drivin’ (Mono)
5. Brainwashed (Mono)
6. Australia (Mono)
7. Shangri-La (Mono)
8. Mr. Churchill Says (Mono)
9. She’s Bought A Hat Like Princess Marina (Mono)
10. Young And Innocent Days (Mono)
11. Nothing To Say (Mono)
12. Arthur (Mono)
Bonus Tracks
13. Plastic Man (Mono)
14. King Kong (Mono)
15. Victoria (Alternate Mono Mix)
16. Australia (Alternate Mono Acetate Mix)
17. Shangri-La (Alternate Mono Mix)
18. She’s Bought A Hat Like Princess Marina (Alternate Mono Mix)
19. Australia (Australian Mono Single Mix/Edit)

DISC THREE
THE GREAT LOST DAVE DAVIES ALBUM PLUS
1. This Man He Weeps Tonight (Stereo)
2. Mindless Child Of Motherhood (Stereo)
3. Hold My Hand (Stereo)
4. Do You Wish To Be A Man? (Stereo)
5. Are You Ready? (Stereo)
6. Creeping Jean (Stereo)
7. I’m Crying (Stereo)
8. Lincoln County (Stereo)
9. Mr. Shoemaker’s Daughter (Stereo)
10. Mr. Reporter (Stereo)
11. Groovy Movies (Stereo)
12. There Is No Life Without Love (Stereo)
Bonus Tracks
13. Lincoln County (Mono Single Mix/Edit)
14. There Is No Life Without Love (Mono)
15. Hold My Hand (Mono)
16. Creeping Jean (Mono Single Mix/Edit)
17. Mindless Child Of Motherhood (Mono)
18. This Man He Weeps Tonight (Mono)
19. Mr. Shoemaker’s Daughter (Alternate Stereo Mix)
20. Mr. Reporter (Alternate Stereo Mix)
21. Groovy Movies (Alternate Stereo Mix)
22. Lincoln County (Acoustic Mix)
23. Hold My Hand (Alternate Take)

DISC FOUR
DEMOS, REHEARSALS, BBC & REMIXES
Part 1
1. Arthur’s Journey (Introduction)
2. Australia (2019 Mix)
3. Home Demos Medley, 1969: Arthur / Victoria / Some Mother’s Son / Drivin’ /
Brainwashed / Mr. Churchill Says (TV Premix)
Part 2
4. Shangri-La (2019 Mix)
5. My Big Sister (Theatrical Version)
6. Stevenage (Theatrical Version)
7. Space (Theatrical Version) (Full Version)
8. The Future (Doo-Wop Version)
9. Arthur (Doo-Wop Version)
Part 3
10. The Virgin Soldiers March
11. Soldiers Coming Home (Instrumental)
12. King Kong (BBC Mix)
13. Victoria (Ray Davies & Band With The DR Symphony & Vocal Ensemble) (Stereo)
14. Arthur (BBC Mix)

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Hear Iggy Pop’s new single, “James Bond”

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Iggy Pop has released the first single from his new album Free, which as Uncut previously reported is due out on Loma Vista / Caroline International on Sept 6.

Hear “James Bond” below:

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“This is an album in which other artists speak for me, but I lend my voice,” explains Iggy Pop of Free, which was created in collaboration with jazz trumpeter Leron Thomas and guitarist Noveller AKA Sarah Lipstate.

The surprisingly downbeat album includes takes on poems by Lou Reed (“We Are The People”) and Dylan Thomas (“Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night”).

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Send us your questions for Bat For Lashes!

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Next to host an Audience With session for Uncut is Natasha Khan AKA Bat For Lashes, who’ll be patiently fielding your enquiries in a future issue.

Since emerging in a haze of fur and gold in the mid-2000s, Bat For Lashes has established Khan as the UK’s premier exponent of magical electro-folk-pop, with three of her four albums being nominated for the Mercury Prize.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

New album Lost Girlsreleased by AWAL Recordings on September 6 – swings back towards the emotional 80s synth-pop sound essayed on 2009’s “Daniel”, but retaining the stately sweep of her last album The Bride. Hear the new single “Feel For You” below.

Outside Bat For Lashes, Khan – the scion of a Pakistani squash dynasty, no less – has collaborated with techno producer Jon Hopkins, explored her shamanic side as the frontwoman of Sexwitch, and she recently won an Ivor Novello award for her soundtrack to the TV drama Requiem.

So what do you want to ask? Send your questions to audiencewith@uncut.co.uk by Tuesday (July 30) – please note the new email address – and Natasha will answer the best ones in a future issue of Uncut.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Uncut: the past, present and future of great music.</strong

The Raconteurs – Help Us Stranger

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Would it be in any way difficult and demanding to work with Jack White? 
Until not so long ago, given his rather prickly reputation 
and exacting creative approach, the answer to that for many might have been no. Yet last year’s Boarding House Reach had moments that suggested he was rediscovering his playful side, and 
if ever there was a record that sounds 
like he’s having a high old time, it’s 
this one.

Maybe he’s fallen in with a good 
crowd. After a full decade away, he’s finally found time to reconvene with his old songwriting foil Brendan Benson, 
plus the familiar rhythm section of Jack Lawrence and Patrick Keeler, and make a third Raconteurs record. But the invigorating if slightly uneven rock’n’roll racket made by these men back then pales in comparison to the vital, vintage but inventive rock record they’ve come up with here.

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It doesn’t start too promisingly, mind. Casual, tuning-up-style twiddles lazily raise themselves off their backsides to pick up the thread of a guitar motif on opening track “Bored And Razed”. But then a switch flicks and we’re smacked in the chops by fat, double-tracked power chords, backed up with bass-drum thumps and cymbal crashes that instantly recall Bon Scott-era AC/DC. And then, surfing on squealing rockabilly guitar licks, we’re off. “Rolling a jukebox joint in the corner/Trolling myself in the mirror at night,” snarls White, with a faintly hysterical, desperate quality that’s instantly riveting. It helps that you can fully imagine him “trolling himself in the mirror”, but he’s not the only one sounding wired to the mains here.

“California bored and raaaaaazed,” he and Benson sing as if spraying phlegm into the same mic, and there’s a crackling energy that pins the listener to the wall. It sounds like the band anthem of a twentysomething group just starting out, rather than the work of a couple of old stagers rapidly approaching middle age. At regular intervals from that point on, there’s a strong sense of a gang of mates channelling the soothingly scabrous sounds of some of their favourite hard-rock records. “Live A Lie” is a glorious 140 seconds, built around a visceral, snarling riff lovingly lifted straight out of The Stooges’ Raw Power, as Benson sees no reason to conceal similarly base instincts in his vocal: “I just wanna live a lie with you/I just wanna lie with you.”

The whoop that greets the drums as they join the instantly stomp-worthy double-guitar riff of “Sunday Driver” recalls the kind of joyous, gonzo-rock attitude heard on fashion-proof albums like The Cult’s Electric. There’s even a bloody cowbell on the psychedelically tinged blues-rock groove of “What’s Yours Is Mine”. Even when they’re changing up the tempo, there’s a sense of summoning up the spirit of 1972; hence the Southern-rock ballad “Somedays (I Don’t Feel Like Trying)” starts off with distinct echoes of Lynyrd Skynyrd’s “Tuesday’s Gone”.

It would be wrong, though, to picture Help Us Stranger as conservative musical comfort food. There’s no shortage of invention and genre mashes to prick up the ears here. Dean Fertita’s tipsy pub-piano riff that barges its way into “Shine The Light On Me” precedes a cooing, harmony-enhanced chorus, then some distinctly Meg-style drums heat up the second verse, and increasingly it’s as if we’re hearing what we might have if The White Stripes had reconvened rather 
than The Raconteurs.

“I hear a lot of rock… but where’s the roll?” Keith Richards is apocryphally quoted as saying. No worries here, Keef. While some of the flintier tracks on The Raconteurs’ last LP, 2008’s Consolers Of The Lonely, had a certain stiff quality, the band here, augmented again by Fertita and Nashville R&B organist Joshua Smith, have made a record driven chiefly by low-slung grooves and strutting riffs rather than workaday indie-rock song structures. And the rhythm section seem to have got the funk in their old age, with the Benson-led country rocker “Help Me Stranger” underpinned by a curious breakbeat reminiscent of the early-’90s period when everyone wanted to have a Clyde Stubblefield or Jabo Starks rhythm in their sample library. Perhaps it should sound awful, but it works.

The one cover on the album, Donovan’s harmonica-honking, turbo-blues B-side “Hey Gyp (Dig The Slowness)”, manages to improve on the original with some inspired extra touches. Patrick Keeler rustles up a supremely funky, shoe-shuffling breakbeat beneath it, which retains a clattery abrasiveness as well 
as a strong groove, while Benson tries the old White trick of voicing his romantic angst through the studio equivalent of 
a loudhailer.

Like many a classic trad-rock album, Help Us Stranger ends on a slow-burning ballad. “Maybe I’m just a castaway, or a poor boy led astray,” White laments on “Thoughts And Prayers”, before bluegrass fiddle and mandolin spiral off into enjoyable bouts of self-pity. Au contraire, Jack sounds like he’s back on the path to righteousness – and, this time, his friends have done him mighty proud.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Uncut: the past, present and future of great music.</strong

Quentin Tarantino: “It’s the hardest film I’ve ever had to make”

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The latest issue of Uncut – in shops now or available to buy online by clicking here – features a lengthy interview with Quentin Tarantino, captured on the set of his new film Once Upon A Time… In Hollywood.

As the director explains to Uncut’s Damon Wise, Once Upon A Time… In Hollywood is not just a yarn about the social upheaval of 
late-’60s California; it is a film freighted by the director’s own personal experiences of both the city and the era: “It’s a memory piece. I’m going back into my childhood self to remember what everything was like.”

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Tarantino was six when he moved to Los Angeles in 1969, and, as you’d imagine from an arch pop-culture obsessive, he remembers the period in detail. “Extreme detail,” he stresses. “I remember what was on the network TV stations at that time. What was on local stations, what the bus stops looked like, the local celebrities… By the time you get to be about six years old, that’s when you start really being conscious about what’s going on around you. You start having TV shows that you want to watch, and you start going to movies. I was very aware of the whole counterculture, too. You couldn’t turn on television without seeing hippies, you’d see hippies on the street. Most of the babysitters that I ever had were hippies.”

Such fastidious recall, however, has proved somewhat problematic as the shoot has progressed. It’s not just that Tarantino’s crystal-clear recollections have set the bar particularly high for the production, but the city itself has changed almost beyond recognition since Tarantino’s childhood.

“It’s certainly different,” he admits. “In the past, say on Jackie Brown, that was me just going around shooting Los Angeles. But for this film, as far as I’m concerned, I might as well be shooting Moscow. Films like Inglourious Basterds, Django Unchained and The Hateful Eight were set-bound. Here, we’re actually shooting all over Los Angeles. Los Angeles is a character in the story and nothing is like the way it was in 1969. We have to create everything. It’s the hardest film I’ve ever had to make.”

But Once Upon A Time… In Hollywood is not a “true” story by any means – despite featuring real-life figures such as Sharon Tate, Steve McQueen and even Bruce Lee. Indeed, he bristles at suggestions that his film is in any way nostalgic. “I don’t consider it nostalgia,” he says. “I just like creating this time of hippie Hollywood, and I like telling the story through two characters who are outside of the gate of hippie Hollywood – who didn’t realise that it was gonna change and can’t believe it changed so quickly.”

You can read much more from Quentin Tarantino – including his thoughts on the Manson murders, and whether his next film really will be his last – in the latest issue of Uncut, in shops now with The Who on the cover.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Robbie Robertson announces new solo album, Sinematic

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Robbie Robertson has announced details of his new solo album, Sinematic.

The record is Robertson’s first new solo release since 2011’s How To Become Clairvoyant.

Below, you can hear “I Hear You Paint Houses” from the album. The track features Van Morrison and will appear in Martin Scorsese‘s new film, The Irishman.

Sinematic is set for release on September 20 via UMC. The album is available now for preorder on CD,
digital and 180-gram 2LP, with a Deluxe Edition, limited to 1000 copies, to follow on October 25.

The album also ties in with a new documentary, Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson And The Band, based on his 2016 memoir, Testimony. The film is due to premiere on September 5 at the 44th Toronto International Film Festival.

Aside from Van Morrison, other guests on the album include Jim Keltner, Derek Trucks and Doyle Bramhall II.

SINEMATIC CD/DIGITAL TRACK LIST
I Hear You Paint Houses
Once Were Brothers
Dead End Kid
Hardwired
Walk In Beauty Way
Let Love Reign
Shanghai Blues
Wandering Souls
Street Serenade
The Shadow
Beautiful Madness
Praying For Rain
Remembrance

SINEMATIC 2LP VINYL TRACK LIST
SIDE A
I Hear You Paint Houses
Once We Were Brothers
Dead End Kid

SIDE B
Hardwired
Walk In Beauty Way
Let Love Reign

SIDE C
Shanghai Blues
Wandering Souls
Street Serenade
The Shadow

SIDE D
Beautiful Madness
Praying For Rain
Remembrance

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

The show has long since sold out, but a press releases advises checking for the release of last minute tickets here.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

The 20th Uncut New Music Playlist Of 2019

As the gates of Hell have well and truly opened this week, I hope this selection will bring you some respite. Amazing to hear new music after 40 years from Betty Davis – expertly delivered by Danielle Maggio – as well as a ton of other returning faves: Joan Shelley, Jenny Hval, Kacy And Clayton, Wilco, DJ Shadow and more. Incidentally, don’t forget you can read more about Joan and her brilliant new album in the new issue of Uncut – The Who on the cover – which you can buy in the shops or direct from our friends here. Free P&P, I should mention, too.

Follow me on Twitter @MichaelBonner

1.
BETTY DAVIS PERFORMED BY DANIELLE MAGGIO

“A Little Bit Hot Tonight”
(via Bandcamp)

2.
JOAN SHELLEY

“Cycle”
(No Quarter)

3.
WILCO

“Love Is Everywhere (Beware)”
(dBpm)

4.
KACY AND CLAYTON

“The Fortyn-Ninth Parallel”
(New West)

5.
JENNY HVAL

“Ashes To Ashes”
(Sacred Bones)

6.
OHTIS

“Only Him And Me”
(Full Time Hobby)

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

7.
SHANNON LAY

“Death Up Close”
(Sub Pop)

8.
SLEATER-KINNEY

“The Center Won’t Hold”
(Mom + Pop)

9.
TINARIWEN

“Zawal [feat. Warren Ellis]”
(Anti-)

10.
DIIV

“Skin Game”
(via Bandcamp)

11.
DJ SHADOW

“Rocket Fuel [feat. De La Soul]”
(Mass Appeal Records)

12.
JON HOPKINS

“Emerald Rush [Solomun remix]”
(Domino)

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Guests revealed for Richard Thompson’s 70th birthday show

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An incredible line-up of special guests has been revealed for Richard Thompson’s 70th birthday celebration show at London’s Royal Albert Hall on September 30.

It includes (deep breath) Alistair Anderson, Ashley Hutchings, Bob Mould, Christine Collister, Danny Thompson, Dave Mattacks, Dave Pegg, David Gilmour, Derek Smalls, Eliza Carthy, Hugh Cornwell, Jack Thompson, James Walbourne, Judith Owen, Kami Thompson, Kate Rusby, Linda Thompson, Loudon Wainwright III, Maddy Prior, Marc Ellington, Martin Carthy, Olivia Chaney, Simon Nicol, Teddy Thompson and Zara Phillips.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

The show has long since sold out, but a press releases advises checking for the release of last minute tickets here.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

The Replacements announce Dead Man’s Pop box set

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The Replacements will release a 4xCD + 1xLP box set called Dead Man’s Pop via Rhino on September 27.

The centrepiece of the package is a stripped-down version of their 1989 album Don’t Tell A Soul, which the band always regarded as too slick.

Order the latest issue of Uncut online and have it sent to your home!

Dead Man’s Pop
features a newly completed mix of the album by Don’t Tell A Soul producer Matt Wallace, based on his 1988 Paisley Park mix; a disc of unreleased recordings, including a session with Tom Waits; plus the band’s entire June 2, 1989 show at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. In total, the box includes 60 tracks, 58 of which have never been heard before.

Presented in a 12×12 hardcover book – loaded with dozens of rarely seen photos – the box set features a detailed history of the Don’t Tell A Soul era written by Bob Mehr, who also wrote Trouble Boys: The True Story of the Replacements.

Mehr writes: “While it’s impossible to unhear a record that’s been around for three decades, Don’t Tell A Soul Redux is the album the band made and intended to release. In addition to Matt Wallace’s mix, Redux also restores several crucial elements from the sessions, including original drums tracks, vocal takes and tempos that were altered in post-production… [and] the band’s original sequence of the album.”

Wallace says: “The true spirit of The Replacements was always there on the recordings we did back in 1988, and now you can hear and feel it clearly… This was the project of a lifetime for me when we recorded it 30-plus years ago, and it’s even truer today as we’ve finally fulfilled our original vision.”

Check out the tracklisting below and pre-order Dead Man’s Pop here, where the first 500 purchasers will also receive a 14-track cassette featuring highlights from the box along with two additional unreleased tracks: the outtake “Asking Me Lies” and an instrumental of “I Won’t” (Bearsville Version). The cassette also features the original, unused cover art for Don’t Tell A Soul.

Disc One: Don’t Tell A Soul Redux
“Talent Show” – Matt Wallace Mix *
“I’ll Be You” – Matt Wallace Mix *
“We’ll Inherit The Earth” – Matt Wallace Mix *
“Achin’ To Be” – Matt Wallace Mix *
“Darlin’ One” – Matt Wallace Mix *
“Back To Back” – Matt Wallace Mix *
“I Won’t” – Matt Wallace Mix *
“Asking Me Lies” – Matt Wallace Mix *
“They’re Blind” – Matt Wallace Mix *
“Anywhere’s Better Than Here” – Matt Wallace Mix *
“Rock ’n’ Roll Ghost” – Matt Wallace Mix *

Disc Two: We Know The Night: Rare and Unreleased
“Portland” – Alternate Mix (Bearsville Version) *
“Achin’ To Be” – Bearsville Version *
“I’ll Be You” – Bearsville Version *
“Wake Up” – Alternate Mix – Bearsville Version *
“We’ll Inherit The Earth” – Bearsville Version *
“Last Thing In The World” *
“They’re Blind” – Bearsville Version *
“Rock ’n’ Roll Ghost” – Bearsville Version *
“Darlin’ One” – Bearsville Version *
“Talent Show” – Demo Version
“Dance On My Planet” *
“We Know The Night” – Alternate Outtake *
“Ought To Get Love” – Alternate Mix *
“Gudbuy T’Jane” – Outtake
“Lowdown Monkey Blues” – Featuring Tom Waits *
“If Only You Were Lonely” – Featuring Tom Waits *
“We Know The Night” – Featuring Tom Waits (Rehearsal) *
“We Know The Night” – Featuring Tom Waits (Full Band Version) *
“I Can Help” – Featuring Tom Waits *
“Date To Church” – Matt Wallace Remix*

Disc Three: The Complete Inconcerated Live, Part One
“Alex Chilton” *
“Talent Show” *
“Back To Back” *
“I Don’t Know” *
“The Ledge” *
“Waitress In The Sky” *
“Anywhere’s Better Than Here” *
“Nightclub Jitters” *
“Cruella De Ville” *
“Achin’ To Be” *
“Asking Me Lies” *
“Bastards Of Young” *
“Answering Machine” *
“Little Mascara” *
“I’ll Be You” *

Disc Four: The Complete Inconcerated Live, Part Two

“Darlin’ One” *
“I Will Dare” *
“Another Girl, Another Planet” *
“I Won’t” *
“Unsatisfied” *
“We’ll Inherit The Earth” *
“Can’t Hardly Wait” *
“Color Me Impressed” *
“Born To Lose” *
“Never Mind” *
“Here Comes A Regular” *
“Valentine” *
“Left Of The Dial” *
“Black Diamond” *

* previously unreleased

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Hear Tinariwen’s new song, “Zawal”

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Tinariwen’s new album Amadjar is out on September 6, featuring guests including Cass McCombs, Micah Nelson and Sunn O)))’s Stephen O’Malley.

Read more about it here and listen to a new song from it, “Zawal”, about witnessing the solar eclipse. It features The Bad Seeds’ Warren Ellis, plus Noura Mint Seymali and Jeiche Ould Chighaly:

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Tinariwen have four UK and Ireland dates coming up, check them out below:

11.11.19 – Olympia – DUBLIN
12.11.19 – Trinity – BRISTOL
13.11.19 – Manchester Cathedral – MANCHESTER
14.11.19 – EaRTH – LONDON

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Send us your questions for Brittany Howard!

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Over the course of two albums and countless shows of declamatory rock’n’soul with Alabama Shakes, Brittany Howard has established herself as one of the most powerful voices in music.

Now she’s taking a sabbatical from the band to release her debut album Jaime, a record that’s more intimate and personal but just as hard-hitting.

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Musically influenced by everything from Prince and neo-soul to lo-fi funk, gospel and electronica, Jaime was realised with the help of a crack group of musicians including jazzers Nate Smith and Robert Glasper, and Howard’s Alabama Shakes bandmate Zac Cockrell.

Howard says that she was inspired to write the record by travelling across the USA. “I saw many beautiful things and many heartbreaking things: poverty, loneliness, discouraged people, empty and poor towns. And of course the great swathes of natural, untouched lands. Huge pink mountains, seemingly endless lakes, soaring redwoods and yellow plains that stretch for thousands of acres. There were these long moments of silence in the car when I could sit and reflect. I wondered what it was I wanted for myself next. I suppose all I want is to help others feel a bit better about being. All I can offer are my own stories in hopes of not only being seen and understood, but also to learn to love my own self as if it were an act of resistance.”

To get yourself up to speed, listen to the previously released singles from Jaime: “History Repeats” is here and “Stay High” is here.

So what do you want to ask? Send your questions to audiencewith@uncut.co.uk by Wednesday (July 24) – please note the new email address – and Brittany Howard will answer the best ones in a future issue of Uncut.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Watch a video for The Flaming Lips’ new single

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The Flaming Lips have released a typically psychedelic video for “How Many Times”.

The single is taken from their current album King’s Mouth, which was released on Friday. “Age has not withered their magical weirdness,” wrote Uncut’s Stephen Dalton in our 8/10 album review. Watch the video below:

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The Flaming Lips play three UK headline shows in September to celebrate the 20th anniversary of their classic album, The Soft Bulletin:

Thursday 5th September – EDINBURGH – Usher Hall
Friday 6th September – MANCHESTER – Academy
Saturday 7th September – LONDON – O2 Academy Brixton

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Introducing NME Gold: Best of NME 1985 – 1989

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To the ’80s, then. Or, more specifically, the second half. In this latest instalment of our ongoing NME Gold series, we witness creativity, rebirth and downright weirdness as it occurred during 1985 – 1989 as documented in the pages of NME. As someone who came of age during this period, these archive pieces on Madchester, The Smiths and more are especially vivid. And beyond that, there’s also a splendid forward by Black Francis. It’s in shops from this Thursday (July 25) but you can buy it from our online store here. Anyway, here’s John Robinson, our one-shots editor, to tell you more, as well as a teaser from Francis’ intro.

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The latest in our Best Of NME series charts 1985-9. A blend of archive features and new eyewitness accounts, the mag contains wonderful new insights on the music world post-Live Aid. Includes arguments with Joni Mitchell, the reinvention of Robert Plant, John Cale and the birth of Madchester, and life in the studio with Tom Waits: “Play like a fat guy in a hat!”

“When I first started, in Boston the mainstream side of things was really easy to laugh at,” recalls Black Francis in his introduction. “Heavy metal had grown into something with a lot of hair and all the clichés of spandex, something about the mainstream was shallow and it was easy to not be that. When MTV first started I was about seventeen and at high school, I’d never seen it before and I went on a ski trip and there was a television at the motel and MTV was on and I remember seeing The English Beat and Elvis Costello and stuff like that and I thought ‘oh, there’s something interesting going on in the world and it’s right here on MTV. A couple of years later when I was starting a band it had grown and become much more dominated by the big-selling commercial music. At the beginning we didn’t know what was gonna be hot and they were just throwing stuff at the wall to see what would stick.

“At the other end of the scene, though, was a very strong seam of underground college rock. In the USA there was a system of radio stations and radio was much more important to people in terms of their consumption of music. So literally at the left of the dial there were all these little, barely regulated college radio stations that college kids ran. So as you travelled around touring there was all this stuff happening on the radio, all these underground bands, and all the bands from out of town, Australia or England or wherever, they were all coming to your city and paying at the club. I was just looking to make music but there was this underground rock music all over that seemed quite healthy. I wanted in on that, that was my big motivator.”

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

The Meters’ Art Neville has died, aged 81

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Art Neville, singer and keyboardist of legendary New Orleans funk band The Meters, has died aged 81.

During a musical career that spanned seven decades, he was feted by everyone from Dr John to Paul McCartney to The Rolling Stones, his style proving hugely influential on the development of popular music.

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Neville was just 16 when his band The Hawketts recorded “Mardi Gras Mambo”, a song which remains of staple of New Orleans’ Mardi Gras celebrations.

He later formed Art Neville & The Neville Sounds who became the house band for Allen Toussaint’s Sansu Records, before morphing into The Meters. As well as putting out a string of trailblazing funk records, The Meters backed Dr John on In The Right Place and toured with The Rolling Stones in the mid-70s.

Neville then teamed up with his brothers Aaron and Cyril to form The Neville Brothers, who won a Grammy for “Healing Chant” from their acclaimed 1989 album Yellow Moon.

In later years, Neville reformed The Meters (sometimes billed as The Funky Meters) and continued to perform until his retirement last year.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Rufus and Martha Wainwright announce Christmas shows

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Rufus and Martha Wainwright have announced that they will play three special Christmas shows in December.

‘A Not So Silent Night’ comes to Dublin’s National Concert Hall on December 2 and 3, and London’s Royal Festival Hall on December 6. Special guests are promised, and The Feeling’s Dan Gillespie Sells will act as musical director.

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The shows mark the tenth anniversary of the Wainwrights’ last ‘A Not So Silent Night’ event in London, which was also the last ever live performance by their mother Kate McGarrigle. All proceeds from the concerts will go towards the Kate McGarrigle Fund supporting sarcoma research, and a music therapy programme for cancer patients to be launched by Martha Wainwright in conjunction with Stand Up To Cancer Canada.

Tickets go on general sale on Friday (July 26) although you can sign up for pre-sales by visiting the official event sites for London’s Southbank and Dublin’s National Concert Hall.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

The Who on their new album: “The songs are fabulous”

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The new issue of Uncut – in shops now or available to buy online by clicking here – features a comprehensive interview with The Who about their incredible 2019: orchestral shows, old favourites revisited, and the upcoming release of their first new album since 2006.

In Nick Hasted’s feature, among many other revelations, Roger Daltrey explains how he overcame his initial reservations about the new Who material.

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“Pete presented me with 12 demos,” the singer recalls. “And there were four, maybe five, of them which I really didn’t like. I thought it was a great Pete Townshend solo album. I told him that. And he got quite angry! He said, ‘I wrote them for you!’ I said, ‘Pete, I don’t know how I can improve it.’ I couldn’t see myself climbing in. I don’t know why. Maybe my passion for The Who’s started to disappear.”

Daltrey eventually modified Townshend’s words till he could sing them. “I said can I change the tense of that song, and move it from being an ‘I’ song to being inclusive? Pete said: ‘Yeah.’ So slowly but surely I climbed into it. I don’t think anyone’s ever understood, including Pete, that doing what I do with his songs is certainly not fucking easy. You have to live them. Do I have to change the songs till I can mean them? Yes. It has to come from my heart. It can’t come from my head. When it comes from my heart, I will touch you with those words. Sometimes I have to change the words to make that possible.”

By May, Daltrey had nearly finished his vocals for eight songs. He prefers to work nowhere near their writer. “Pete [initially] wanted this album out for June,” he says. “So I went under incredible pressure to a little studio near me in Sussex, and I didn’t have time to bugger around with a new producer. I got Dave Eringa, who produced my last solo album and the Wilko Johnson album, because he knows how I like to work. I went into the studio for eight afternoons – because I can only do three hours at a time. I don’t let my voice get worn out at all these days. When I record, I like to do it like I’m a painter. I sketch. I dab notes on, and go away and live with it for a while. Then I went in one day, after I’d done all my sketches, and did the whole thing.” He’s satisfied with the results. “I have to say it’s a far better Who album than it is a Pete Townshend album! I mean, I don’t know what people want out of The Who any more. But the songs are fabulous.”

Townshend summarised those songs, tongue in vicinity of cheek, as “dark ballads, heavy rock stuff, experimental electronica, sampled stuff, and clichéd Who tunes that begin with a guitar that goes danga-dang”.

“I’m not too sold on the electronic stuff,” Daltrey considers. “Generally I find that stuff now is dated. I love guitars. And I love the bass guitar in particular. And he’s my favourite all-time guitarist. All the other guys are technicians and they’re brilliant, and they might be fast and they might be slick. Townshend’s always original. And that for me is everything. He’s always searching.”

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Brian Eno – Apollo: Atmospheres 
& Soundtracks

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As the ’80s dawned, humanity was once again turning its eyes to the skies. In March 1983, Ronald Reagan, a former screen cowboy turned 40th President Of The United States, unveiled his latest strategy in an increasingly hot Cold War – a strategic missile defence system which, in a nod to the pop culture of the day, earned the nickname “Star Wars”. Star Wars was conceived in the very American spirit that the best defence was a good offence.

The idea was that a notional Soviet strike might be averted by simply blasting enemy missiles out of the sky with laser-guided warheads – a sort of nuclear-powered equivalent of the quick-witted gunslinger in a Hollywood western who disarms his opponent by shooting the revolver out of his hand. It was all a reminder that the cosmos represented something new in the American psyche: not merely a blank canvas to be explored, but a place to be conquered – in the words of another TV show, the final frontier.

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Some four months after Reagan’s speech, music fans were granted another, rather more benign vision of the cosmos. Brian Eno had been experimenting with his idea of ambient music for approaching a decade, but Apollo: Atmospheres & Soundtracks was perhaps the finest, most refined example of ambient to date. Apollo is mostly rooted in a sort of dreamy somnambulance, but in fact underwent a rather troubled birth. It was originally commissioned as the score to a feature-length documentary by director Al Reinert that made use of previously unseen 35mm footage of the Apollo 11 moon landings. But after some poorly received test screenings, Reinert returned to the editing suite for some extensive reworking. (The film finally saw wide release in 1989 under the name For All Mankind, with some of Eno’s score excised.)

Instead, Eno’s Apollo took on a life of its own. In places, its 12 tracks recall earlier records that sought to grapple with the majesty and enormity of the cosmos. “The Secret Place” and “Signals” owe something to the minimal kosmische music practised by German electronic groups like Tangerine Dream and Cluster, creating a lonely and isolated sound using heavily treated guitars and synths soaked in echo and delay. But Apollo is not all so abstract. On the contrary, the presence of two new collaborators – a young Canadian guitarist/producer named Daniel Lanois and Eno’s younger brother Roger, a classically trained pianist here making 
his recording debut – nudges Apollo into more overtly musical territory.

Speaking with Reinert, Eno had discovered that all the astronauts on the Apollo mission had been allowed to take a cassette into space, and all but one had taken country music. Eno had grown up on country, which he had heard on American Armed Forces radio as a child, and he was struck by the juxtaposition. Country music, he told an interviewer in 1990, was “very much like ‘space music’… it has all the connotations of pioneering, of the American myth of the brave individual, and that myth has strong resonances throughout American culture.” In a way, then, Apollo is a sort of space-age frontier music. Tracks like “Silver Morning” and “Deep Blue Day” envisage a sort of weightless country & western, the soundtrack to an eternity drifting across the great plains of space, propelled by Lanois’ languid pedal steel.

This re-release commemorates 50 years since the Apollo 11 moon landings. While such anniversary events typically prompt a dredging through the archive for diverting outtakes, here Eno has taken a different approach. Alongside the original LP, remastered in full by Abbey Road’s Miles Showell, Eno reconvened the original trio for the first time since 1983, to create 11 brand-new tracks reimagining the soundtrack to For All Mankind. Unlike the original sessions, the trio worked remotely, with Lanois in the US and Roger Eno in Suffolk. 
The MIDI or WAV files they produced were then sent over to the elder Eno’s London studio, where he assembled the finished article. “What you hear now is a collaboration distant both in geographical terms, from one another, and temporal terms, from the original project,” explains Roger Eno.

Much of the spirit of the original remains intact though, but, with the division of labour split among more democratic lines, it’s perhaps easier to determine individual contributions. You can see Brian Eno’s fingerprints all over the eerie music-box progressions of “At The Foot Of The Ladder”, but a handful of Lanois compositions foreground chiming acoustic guitar and lap steel, radiating a sense of deep calm. And there is no doubting the quiet power of Roger Eno’s contributions; his “Waking Up” is striking in its restraint, little starbursts of treated piano bordering on moments of silence that feel like a quick gulp of oxygen.

Opening track “The End Of A Thin Chord” recalls Apollo’s “Deep Blue Day”, a sort of interstellar exotica spun from gentle, chiming melodies and a slight dusting of distortion, while Roger Eno’s chilling “Under The Moon” is bleaker in sound than anything on the original LP. Perhaps the most moving piece, though, is Brian Eno’s “Clear Desert Night”, with its lonely stargazing feel.

It’s an odd sort of idea: a trio paying tribute to themselves. But even if no new ground is being broken exactly, there’s a pleasure in hearing the old space cadets out on manoeuvres. The music of Apollo is meditative and benign, yet strangely inscrutable; a reminder that while you might be able to visit space, it will never be home.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.