Watch PJ Harvey’s new video for “The Orange Monkey”

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PJ Harvey has released a video for her song, “The Orange Monkey“.

The track is taken form her current album, The Hope Six Demolition Project, and has been directed by photo-journalist and film-maker, Seamus Murphy.

The track to be taken from Harvey’s album, the video for “The Orange Monkey” was shot in Afghanistan and follows videos for “The Wheel” and “The Community of Hope“, also directed by Murphy.

Said Murphy, “With the films I make for Polly Harvey’s music I try to reflect the song’s tune and mood, which means tapping into emotion. I find emotion a truer compass than intellect when it comes to finding images and creating sequences for music.

“‘The Orange Monkey’ has warm, earthen colours with a pleasant, unrushed feel to it. There’s an underlying melancholy, which is leavened by the strength and energy of the Afghan people. We know there is tragedy but what we see is resilience.

“All the material for the film was shot in Afghanistan over two trips I made in 2012 and one in 2014. In December 2012 Polly joined me and we travelled together in Afghanistan. Places featured are Kabul, Parwan, Nangarhar and Helmand Provinces.

“The country is different each time; different politics, different conditions, different dangers and then there’s the physical differences brought about by the change in seasons. Songs gets drawn from many experiences and events in a writer’s life and some elements could equally fit other songs about other things. Films work in similar ways. Would the shot of the baker drinking his Chai Sabz (green tea) be any different had it been taken on an earlier or later trip? This film comes from work made over several recent trips but also from a reservoir of memories dating back to my first visit to Afghanistan in 1994.”

The July 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Prince, plus Carole King, Paul Simon, case/lang/viers, Laurie Anderson, 10CC, Wilko Johnson, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Steve Gunn, Ryan Adams, Lift To Experience, David Bowie and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

The Rolling Stones collaborating with Eric Clapton on their new album?

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The Rolling Stones are reportedly recording with Eric Clapton.

According to The Sun, Clapton and the Stones recently ran into each other at a west London recording studio and have since recorded two songs together with producer Don Was.

Ron Wood had previously revealed that that the band have been on “a blues streak” in the recording studio, covering standards by the likes of Howlin’ Wolf and Little Walter.

“They really sound authentic,” Wood said of the band’s new tracks in April. “We went in to cut some new songs, which we did. But we got on a blues streak. We cut 11 blues in two days… When we heard them back after not hearing them for a couple of months, we were, ‘Who’s that?’ ‘It’s you.’ It sounded so authentic.”

Last year the Stones shared a previously unreleased version of “Brown Sugar” featuring Eric Clapton from their deluxe reissue of Sticky Fingers.

Speaking to Uncut about this unreleased version of “Brown Sugar“, producer Chris Kimsey recalled, “Keith and Bobby Keys had a joint birthday party at Olympic [Studios]. I remember Al Kooper and Eric Clapton being there. I recorded this ‘Brown Sugar’ jam that went on for 15 minutes. Alan O’Duffy, who was booked to engineer the session, fancied a bit of this lovely birthday cake that was going around. It was hash cake. 15 minutes later he was gone, so I had to engineer that evening’s session. It was quite terrifying. All these people came in. We recorded this extended version of ‘Brown Sugar’. Everyone was playing live, like a big club. I remember George Harrison turning up as well.”

The July 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Prince, plus Carole King, Paul Simon, case/lang/viers, Laurie Anderson, 10CC, Wilko Johnson, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Steve Gunn, Ryan Adams, Lift To Experience, David Bowie and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Beach Boys exclusive! Hear a previously unreleased version of “Sloop John B”

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A special 50th anniversary edition of the Beach Boys‘ classic album Pet Sounds is in shops next week, June 10.

Voted Uncut’s Greatest Album Of All Time, Pet Sounds needs no introduction, of course. The 50th anniversary edition, however, is available in several forms including a 4CD/Blu-ray Audio collectors edition.

Presented in a hardbound book, it features the remastered original album in stereo and mono, plus hi res stereo, mono, instrumental, and 5.1 surround mixes, session outtakes, alternate mixes, and previously unreleased live recordings.

We’re delighted to give you an exclusive preview one of those unreleased tracks – a live recording of “Sloop John B” from 1966.

The tracklisting for the 4CD/Blu-ray Audio collectors edition is:

CD 1
Pet Sounds (Mono)
Wouldn’t It Be Nice
You Still Believe In Me
That’s Not Me
Don’t Talk (Put Your Head On My Shoulder)
I’m Waiting For The Day
Let’s Go Away For Awhile
Sloop John B
God Only Knows
I Know There’s An Answer
Here Today
I Just Wasn’t Made For These Times
Pet Sounds
Caroline No

Pet Sounds (Stereo)
Wouldn’t It Be Nice
You Still Believe In Me
That’s Not Me
Don’t Talk (Put Your Head On My Shoulder)
I’m Waiting For The Day
Let’s Go Away For Awhile
Sloop John B
God Only Knows
I Know There’s An Answer
Here Today
I Just Wasn’t Made For These Times
Pet Sounds
Caroline No
Additional Material
Caroline No (Promotional Spot #2)
Don’t Talk. . . (Unused Background Vocals)
Hang On To Your Ego (Alternate Mix)
Caroline No (Promotional Spot #1)

CD 2
The Pet Sounds Sessions
Sloop John B (Highlights from Tracking Date)
Sloop John B (Stereo Backing Track)
Trombone Dixie (Highlights from Tracking Date)
Trombone Dixie (Stereo Backing Track)
Pet Sounds (Highlights from Tracking Date)
Pet Sounds (Stereo Track Without Guitar Overdub)
Let’s Go Away For Awhile (Highlights from Tracking Date)
Let’s Go Away For Awhile (Stereo Track Without String Overdub)
Wouldn’t It Be Nice (Highlights from Tracking Date)
Wouldn’t It Be Nice (Stereo Backing Track)
Wouldn’t It Be Nice (Stereo Track with Background Vocals)
You Still Believe In Me (Intro – Session)
You Still Believe In Me (Intro – Master Take)
You Still Believe In Me (Highlights from Tracking Date)
You Still Believe In Me (Stereo Backing Track)
Caroline No (Highlights from Tracking Date)
Caroline No (Stereo Backing Track)
Hang On To Your Ego (Highlights from Tracking Date)
Hang On To Your Ego (Stereo Backing Track)
I Know There’s An Answer (Vocal Session) [previously unreleased]
Don’t Talk (Put Your Head On My Shoulder) (Brian’s Instrumental Demo)
Don’t Talk (Put Your Head On My Shoulder) (Stereo Backing Track)
Don’t Talk (Put Your Head On My Shoulder) (String Overdub)
I Just Wasn’t Made For These Times (Highlights from Tracking Date)
I Just Wasn’t Made For These Times (Stereo Backing Track)
That’s Not Me (Highlights from Tracking Date)
That’s Not Me (Stereo Backing Track)

CD 3
The Pet Sounds Sessions (continued)
Good Vibrations (Highlights from First Tracking Date)
Good Vibrations (Stereo Backing Track)
I’m Waiting For The Day (Highlights from Tracking Date)
I’m Waiting For The Day (Stereo Backing Track)
God Only Knows (Highlights from Tracking Date)
God Only Knows (Stereo Backing Track)
Here Today (Highlights from Tracking Date)
Here Today (Stereo Backing Track)

Alternate Versions
Wouldn’t It Be Nice (Mono Alternate Mix 1)
You Still Believe In Me (Mono Alternate Mix)
I’m Waiting For The Day (Mono Alternate Mix, Mike sings lead)
Sloop John B (Mono Alternate Mix, Carl sings first verse)
God Only Knows (Mono Alternate Mix, with sax solo)
I Know There’s An Answer (Alternate Mix) [previously unreleased]
Here Today (Mono Alternate Mix, Brian sings lead)
I Just Wasn’t Made For These Times (Mono Alternate Mix)
Banana & Louie
Caroline No (Original Speed, Stereo Mix)
Dog Barking Session
God Only Knows (With A Cappella Tag)
Wouldn’t It Be Nice (Mono Alternate Mix 2)
Sloop John B (Mono Alternate Mix, Brian sings lead throughout)
God Only Knows (Mono Alternate Mix, Brian sings lead)
Caroline No (Original Speed, Mono Mix)

CD 4
Live Recordings [all previously unreleased]
Wouldn’t It Be Nice
Sloop John B
God Only Knows
Michigan State University, October 22, 1966
Good Vibrations
God Only Knows
Wouldn’t It Be Nice
Daughters of the American Revolution Constitution Hall, Washington DC, November 19, 1967
God Only Knows
Carnegie Hall, New York, November 23, 1972 (2nd Show)
God Only Knows
Jamaican World Music Festival, Montego Bay, Jamaica, November, 26, 1982
Sloop John B
Universal Studios, Universal City, California, May, 23, 1989
Caroline No
You Still Believe In Me
Paramount Theater, New York City, November 26, 1993
Stack-O-Vocals
Wouldn’t It Be Nice
You Still Believe In Me
That’s Not Me
Don’t Talk (Put Your Head On My Shoulder)
I’m Waiting For The Day
Sloop John B
God Only Knows
I Know There’s An Answer
Here Today
I Just Wasn’t Made For These Times
Caroline No
Bonus Track
Good Vibrations (Master Track with Partial Vocal) (previously unreleased)

Blu-ray Pure Audio Disc
5.1 Surround Sound: 96kHz/24-bit
Mono; Stereo; Stereo Instrumental (new to hi res): 192kHz/24-bit
Wouldn’t It Be Nice
You Still Believe In Me
That’s Not Me
Don’t Talk (Put Your Head On My Shoulder)
I’m Waiting For The Day
Let’s Go Away For Awhile
Sloop John B
God Only Knows
I Know There’s An Answer
Here Today
I Just Wasn’t Made For These Times
Pet Sounds
Caroline No
Additional Material in 5.1 Surround and Stereo
Unreleased Backgrounds (Unused Intro for “Don’t Talk (Put Your Head On My Shoulder)”)
Wouldn’t It Be Nice (Session Highlights)
Wouldn’t It Be Nice (Alternative Mix without Lead Vocal)
God Only Knows (Session Highlights)
God Only Knows (Master Track Mix with A Cappella Tag)
Summer Means New Love

The July 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Prince, plus Carole King, Paul Simon, case/lang/viers, Laurie Anderson, 10CC, Wilko Johnson, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Steve Gunn, Ryan Adams, Lift To Experience, David Bowie and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

The 18th Uncut Playlist Of 2016

The arrival of the Avalanches’ comeback single this morning has prompted us to fall down a bit of a weird rabbit hole, culminating in finding the Fatboy Slim NME mixtape I had some hand in back in 1997. Still sounds terrific.

Probably bigger news in our world this week, though, is the new Ryley Walker album, which moves on from “Primrose Green” to enter a space where he’s referencing Kozelek, Eitzel, O’Rourke and Alice Coltrane as well as Jansch, Martyn etc, and at the same time developing a much more defined voice of his own. One of the albums of the year, I’d risk suggesting (If you missed my characteristically over-generous round-up of the year’s releases so far, btw, you can find it here.

Follow me on Twitter @JohnRMulvey

1 Ryley Walker – Golden Sings That Have Been Sung (Dead Oceans)

2 Marielle V Jakobsons – Star Core (Thrill Jockey)

3 Protein – The Secret Garden (Alien Transistor)

4 Thee Oh Sees – A Weird Exits (Castleface)

5 The Strokes – Future Present Past (Cult)

6 De La Soul – And The Anonymous Nobody (Kobalt)

7 JJ Cale – Really (Mercury)

8 Connie Acher – For Giving (Golden Lab)

9 The Deslondes – Tres Grand Serpent (New West)

10 Horse Lords – Interventions (Northern Spy)

11 Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith – Ears (Western Vinyl)

12 Kate Carr – I Had Myself A Nuclear Spring (Rivertones)

https://soundcloud.com/caughtbytheriver/risingwatersaloneinthedarkkatecarr

13 Factory Floor – Dial Me In (DFA)

14 Watery Love – Ned’s Dreamcatcher/Meg’s Dreamcatcher (Richie Records/Testoster Tunes)

15 Psychic Temple – III (Asthmatic Kitty)

16 Floating Points – Kuiper EP (Pluto)

17 The Avalanches – Frankie Sinatra (XL)

18 Bentley Rhythm Ace – Bentley’s Gonna Sort You Out (Skint)

19 Sabres Of Paradise – Wilmot (Warp)

20 Various Artists – Beat Up The NME: Mixed By Fatboy Slim (NME)

The Avalanches announce new album, share “Frankie Sinatra”

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The Avalanches have announced details of their first new album for 15 years.

Wildflower will be released on July 8 by XL Recordings.

The album has been created by the band’s core duo – Robbie Chater and Tony Di Blasi.

Said Chater, “What kept us going during the making this record was a belief in the day-to-day experience of music as a life force – as life energy. Hearing a certain song on a certain morning can change your day; it can make the world look different, changing the way you perceive light refracting through the atmosphere for the rest of the afternoon. Literally changing the colour and feeling-tone of your world.”

The band have shared a video for “Frankie Sinatra“, which features Danny Brown and MF Doom on vocals, and also includes works by calypsonian Wilmoth Houdini and Rodgers & Hammerstein.

The July 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Prince, plus Carole King, Paul Simon, case/lang/viers, Laurie Anderson, 10CC, Wilko Johnson, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Steve Gunn, Ryan Adams, Lift To Experience, David Bowie and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

John Coltrane mono box set announced

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A number of John Coltrane‘s mono albums from the Atlantic label will be released in CD and LP boxed sets.

John Coltrane: The Atlantic Years – In Mono is due from Rhino on June 10.

Newly remastered, the collection includes a replica of the original ‘My Favorite Things Part I & II’ as a 7″ single, exclusive to the vinyl set.

TRACK LISTING:
DISC 1: GIANT STEPS
1. Giant Steps
2. Cousin Mary
3. Countdown 4. Spiral
5. Syeeda’s Song Flute
6. Naima
7. Mr P.C.

DISC 2: BAGS & TRANE (with Milt Jackson)
1. Bags & Trane
2. Three Little Words
3. The Night We Called It A Day
4. Be-Bop
5. The Late Late Blues

DISC 3: OLE COLTRANE
1. Olé
2. Dahomey Dance
3. Aisha

DISC 4: COLTRANE PLAYS THE BLUES

1. Blues To Elvin
2. Blues To Bechet
3. Blues To You
4. Mr. Day
5. Mr. Syms
6. Mr. Knight

DISC 5: THE AVANT-GARDE (with Don Cherry)

1. Cherryco
2. Focus On Sanity
3. The Blessing
4. The Invisible
5. Bemsha Swing

DISC 6: THE COLTRANE LEGACY
1. 26-2
2. Original Untitled Ballad
3. Untitled Ballad
4. Centerpiece
5. Stairway To The Stars
6. Blues Legacy

DISC 7: MY FAVORITE THINGS 7″ SINGLE (Vinyl Boxed Set Only)
1. My Favorite Things Part I
2. My Favorite Things Part II

The July 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Prince, plus Carole King, Paul Simon, case/lang/viers, Laurie Anderson, 10CC, Wilko Johnson, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Steve Gunn, Ryan Adams, Lift To Experience, David Bowie and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Ryley Walker announces new album, shares “The Halfwit in Me”

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Ryley Walker has confirmed details of his new album.

Golden Sings That Have Been Sung will be released on August 19 by Dead Oceans. It is the follow-up to his 2015 album, Primrose Green.

Walker has debuted a track from the new album, “The Halfwit In Me”, which you can hear below.

The tracklisting for Golden Sings That Have Been Sung is:

The Halfwit In Me
A Choir Apart
Funny Thing She Said
Sullen Mind
I Will Ask You Twice
The Roundabout
The Great And Undecided
Age Old Tale

Walker has also announced a run of live UK dates around the release.

He will play:

Wednesday 15th June – LONDON – Oval Space

Friday 29th July – CORNWALL – Port Eliot Festival
Tuesday 2nd August – HEBDEN BRIDGE – Trades Club (with Danny Thompson)
Wednesday 3rd August – NOTTINGHAM – Glee Club (with Danny Thompson)
Thursday 4th August – NORWICH – Arts Centre (with Danny Thompson)
Friday 5th August – HASTINGS – St Mary’s in the Castle (with Danny Thompson)
Saturday 6th August – LONDON – Caught By The River Thames
Monday 8th August – CARDIFF – The Globe
Tuesday 9th August – LEAMINGTON SPA – Zephyr Lounge
Wednesday 10th August – YORK – The Crescent
Friday 12th August – GUILDFORD – St Mary’s
Saturday 20th August – BRECON BEACONS – Green Man festival

Sunday 13th November – BRIGHTON – The Haunt
Monday 14th November – MANCHESTER – Ruby Lounge
Tuesday 15th November – GLASGOW – Broadcast
Thursday 17th November – LONDON – Islington Assembly Hall

The July 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Prince, plus Carole King, Paul Simon, case/lang/viers, Laurie Anderson, 10CC, Wilko Johnson, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Steve Gunn, Ryan Adams, Lift To Experience, David Bowie and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Kraftwerk lose legal battle over sampling dispute

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Kraftwerk have lost a legal battle in Germany’s highest court over the sampling of one of their songs.

The sample came from band’s 1977 song “Metall auf Metall“. The dispute centres on a short drum sequence looped repeatedly in the song “Nur Mir (Only Me)” by Sabrina Setlur.

Kraftwerk’s Ralf Hutter sued producer Moses Pelham, alleging that his use of the clip, without asking, infringed the band’s intellectual property rights.

But the German Constitutional Court decided that the impact on Kraftwerk did not outweigh “artistic freedom” and ruled that Pelham can sample the two-second beat from without infringing copyright.

The Guardian reports that court, based in Karlsruhe in south-west Germany, said the sequences were only seconds long and “led to the creation of a totally new and independent piece of work”.

“The economic value of the original sound was therefore not diminished,” the court said, adding that banning sampling would in effect spell the end of some music styles.

“The hip-hop music style lives by using such sound sequences and would not survive if it were banned.”

The ruling overturns a previous decision by the federal court of justice.

The dispute began in 1997, when Hütter claimed that Pelham had infringed Kraftwerk’s intellectual property rights without permission.

In 2012, Germany’s highest court for non-constitutional legal matters ruled in Kraftwerk’s favour.

Pelham’s lawyer, Udo Kornmeier, subsequently appealed to the highest court in Germany.

The July 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Prince, plus Carole King, Paul Simon, case/lang/viers, Laurie Anderson, 10CC, Wilko Johnson, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Steve Gunn, Ryan Adams, Lift To Experience, David Bowie and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

King Gizzard And The Lizard Wizard – Nonagon Infinity

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By their very nature, King Gizzard have always appeared to value loose spontaneity over the close approach of the craftsman. Since emerging from Melbourne in 2010, this seven-headed psych-rock monster have released seven diverse albums, each capturing quick-fire bursts of inspiration, and thrilling in their imperfections and impulsiveness.

On I’m In Your Mind Fuzz, their garage-punk breakthrough from late 2014, they managed to create half a concept album about mind control, before losing concentration and filling Side Two with slower, disjointed songs recorded at a different studio. As their notoriety grew, their restless, relentless muse last year spawned two albums exploring different tangents of their scattershot sound – Quarters was a laidback, semi-improvised effort with four tracks each lasting exactly 10 minutes and 10 seconds (it bizarrely bagged a Best Jazz Album nomination at the ARIAs), while autumn’s Papier Mâché Dream Balloon consisted of uncustomary pastoral, acoustic rambles.

Yet we now learn that these two albums were merely stopgaps, recorded while singer and guitarist Stu Mackenzie and his six cohorts secretly toiled on a project that would finish what they attempted with I’m In Your Mind Fuzz – a bona fide concept album, unified in sound and vision. While the last decade has undoubtedly been a fertile time for the kind of underground rock that takes inspiration from garage, punk, prog and psychedelia, Ty Segall, Thee Oh Sees and their ilk have so far attempted little on this scale.

Although it was tracked in four days at the all-analogue Daptone House Of Soul in Brooklyn, New York, Nonagon Infinity was meticulously planned beforehand, then the subsequent recordings were subjected to endless tinkering back in Australia. The need for this work becomes clear when the album is heard – each song on Nonagon segues into the next, while the end of the final track, “Road Train”, can even be looped straight back to careen headlong, Möbius strip-style, into the opening song, “Robot Stop”, their beats matched and primed. What’s more, various melodies, riffs and refrains pop up repeatedly throughout the album, making it more akin to a 41-minute suite than nine separate songs.

On first listen, Nonagon is a hard-driving, exhausting beast; powered by two drummers, “Road Train” edges into Motörhead hard-rock, while “Big Fig Wasp” continues King Gizzard’s adoration for Thee Oh Sees, mixing a motorik beat with Mackenzie’s echoed whoops and demonic guitars (chief Oh See John Dwyer fittingly released I’m In Your Mind Fuzz on his Castle Face label in the US). The seven-minute “Evil Death Roll” harks back to the manic momentum of Hawkwind’s Space Ritual version of “Master Of The Universe”, with distorted organ and super-wah’d guitars adding to the onslaught. There are few simple thrills here, as beats are dropped and riffs gallop along in unwieldy time signatures – “Gamma Knife” might be the most driving song ever conceived in 6/8, while “Nonagon infinity opens the door” is an earworm in 7/8 time. Though Mackenzie barks out vague orders on “Robot Stop” – “Loosen up/Time to jump/Fuck shit up/Don’t forget about it” – his lyrics are often unintelligible through the fuzz, with Hammer horror images of “corpses”, “pitchforks” and a “final hearing” breaking through the haze.

With repeated listens, however, what first seems like an oppressively flat landscape – giant steppes, perhaps – gradually reveals relief, and a lot more nuance that rewards repeated immersion. Subtler elements begin to peek out from the hard-driving tempos: the electric saz solo on “Robot Stop”; the synth storm swelling up in “Big Fig Wasp” that seems to mimic said insect’s mighty buzzing; the middle of “Invisible Face” that echoes the cool-jazz labyrinths of Quarters opener “The River”; the sections on “Wah Wah” that nod to the acoustic reveries of Papier Mâché…. The entirety of the punning “Mr Beat” is five minutes of relative respite, its clowning keyboards and falsetto reminiscent of Unknown Mortal Orchestra. Elsewhere, fidelities shift between (and even within) songs, with Mackenzie deliberately moving microphones around between takes to get more sonic variation.

As King Gizzard’s frontman tells Uncut, making Nonagon Infinity was a gruelling experience compared to the relatively breezy gestation of their previous work, and yet this prolonged concentration has resulted in by far King Gizzard’s most cohesive record to date – a hyper-detailed punk opera that few of their peers have matched for intensity, ambition or sheer derangement. It’s no accident that the end of the album links up to the start: those who listen may find it difficult to get off this particular Möbius strip.

Q&A
Stu Mackenzie
Where does your fascination with concept albums come from?

It gives you a drive, a reason or a motive to make music. I wouldn’t want to make the same record over and over again. Before we’ve started every record we’ve always had a little idea or a little direction. That’s always been the motive, to figure out the pathway to get to that end point.

With all the repeating refrains and cut-ups, how was it structuring the album?

It was a nightmare, but we got there in the end. A lot of it was stitched together digitally, because it was kind of the only way I could figure out how to do it. But there are quite a lot of tape edits in there. I think it’s my favourite album we’ve done, we just spent so much more time on this than anything before. I kind of hate it as well, just because of how much I listened to it.

Presumably you already have another album lined up…
I think we’re gonna need to take a little break after this one. It was a bit of a mind-melter, this one, just devastatingly difficult in some ways. We kind of crunched our little minds, so we might chill for a little bit. We’ve got some ideas, but I don’t know whether we’ll get another record out this year – probably just this one. Maybe we can do something more turbo next year, but I think it’s time to chill out!

INTERVIEW: TOM PINNOCK

The July 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Prince, plus Carole King, Paul Simon, case/lang/viers, Laurie Anderson, 10CC, Wilko Johnson, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Steve Gunn, Ryan Adams, Lift To Experience, David Bowie and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

The Best Albums Of 2016: Halftime Report

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Someone asked me on Twitter the other day when I might put together a list of the albums I’ve enjoyed thus far this year, and this morning seemed as good a time as any to make a stab at it. Here, I think, are the albums I’ve enjoyed that were released, or will be released, between January and the end of June 2016.

I patched this together from my weekly playlists in haste, so there’s a fair chance I may have missed one or two things; I only just remembered “Blackstar”, of all things, for instance. Still, it’ll hopefully prove to be a useful primer, or conversation-starter, on a typically strong six months of new music. I’ve arranged them in alphabetical order for now, but early garlands maybe should be heading, on this morning’s whim, towards Chris Forsyth, Brigid Mae Power, Psychic Temple and The Skiffle Players.

Dig in, anyhow – and please let me know your own favourites and alert me to what I might have missed…

Follow me on Twitter @JohnRMulvey

  1. Chris Abrahams – Fluid To The Influence (Room40)
  2. Idris Ackamoor & The Pyramids – We Be All Africans (Strut)

https://soundcloud.com/philophon/idris-ackamoor-the-pyramids-rhapsody-in-berlin-part-1#t=0:00

  1. Marisa Anderson – Into The Light (Bandcamp)
  2. Animal Collective – Painting With (Domino)

  1. Autechre – Elseq 1-5 (Warp)
  2. Beyonce – Lemonade (Parkwood)
  3. Big Thief – Masterpiece (Saddle Creek)

  1. Bitchin Bajas & Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy – Epic Jammers And Fortunate Little Ditties (Drag City)

  1. Black Mountain – IV (Jagjaguwar)
  2. Karl Blau – Introducing… (Bella Union)

  1. Bombino – Azel (Partisan)

  1. David Bowie – Blackstar (Isolar)
  2. Charles Bradley – Changes (Daptone)

    1. Brian Case – Tense Nature (Hands In The Dark)
    2. Case/Lang/Veirs – Case/Lang/Veirs (Anti-)
      1. Cavern of Anti-Matter– void beats/invocation trex (Duophonic)
      2. Christine & The Queens – Christine & The Queens (Because)

      1. Coypu – Floating (MIE Music)
      2. The Dead Tongues – Montana (Self-released)

https://soundcloud.com/winsome-management/graveyard-fields-by-the-dead-tongues

      1. Dreamboat – Dreamboat (MIE Music)
      2. Bob Dylan – Fallen Angels (Columbia)

      1. Brian Eno – The Ship (Warp)
      2. Christian Fennesz & Jim O’Rourke – It’s Hard For Me To Say I’m Sorry (Editions Mego)
      1. Chris Forsyth & The Solar Motel Band – The Rarity Of Experience (No Quarter)

      1. Eleanor Friedberger – New View (Frenchkiss)
      2. Steve Gunn – Eyes On The Lines (Matador)

27 PJ Harvey – The Hope Six Demolition Project (Island)

      1. Tim Hecker – Love Streams (4AD)

      1. Heron Oblivion – Heron Oblivion (Sub Pop)

      1. Dave Heumann – Cloud Hands (2020)
      2. Glenn Jones – Fleeting (Thrill Jockey)

https://soundcloud.com/thrilljockey/flower-turned-inside-out-1

      1. Khun Narin – II (Innovative Leisure)
      2. King – We Are King (King Creative)

      1. King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard – Nonagon Infinity (Heavenly)

      1. Konono N°1 – Konono N°1 Meets Batida (Crammed Discs)
      2. Kendrick Lamar – Untitled Unmastered (Top Dawg)
      1. Laraaji & Sun Araw – Professional Sunflow (W.25th/Superior Viaduct)
      2. Mary Lattimore & Jeff Zeigler – Music Inspired By Philippe Garrel’s Le Révélateur (Thrill Jockey)
      3. Mary Lattimore – At The Dam (Ghostly International)

      1. The Limiñanas – Malamore (Because)

      1. Jenks Miller & Rose Cross NC – Blues From WHAT (Three-Lobed)
      2. Mogwai – Atomic (Rock Action)

      1. Kevin Morby – Singing Saw (Dead Oceans)

      1. Marissa Nadler – Strangers (Bella Union)

      1. Cian Nugent – Night Fiction (Woodsist)
      2. Pita – Get In (Editions Mego)

      1. Iggy Pop/Tarwater/Alva Noto – Leaves Of Grass (Morr Music)
      2. Iggy Pop – Post Pop Depression (Rekords Rekords/Loma Vista/Caroline International)
      3. Brigid Mae Power – Brigid Mae Power (Tompkins Square)

      1. Margo Price – Midwest Farmer’s Daughter (Third Man)

      1. Mark Pritchard – Under The Sun (Warp)

      1. Psychic Temple – Plays Music For Airports (Bandcamp)
      2. Psychic Temple – Psychic Temple II (Asthmatic Kitty)
      3. Radiohead – A Moon Shaped Pool (XL)

      1. Savages – Adore Life (Matador)
      2. The Skiffle Players – Skifflin’ (Spiritual Pajamas)
      1. Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith – Ears (Western Vinyl)

      1. Spacin’ – Total Freedom (Testoster Tunes)
      2. The Still – The Still (Bronzerat)
      3. Prins Thomas – Principe Del Norte (Smalltown Supersound)

      1. Protein – The Secret Garden (Alien Transistor)
      2. Tortoise -The Catastrophist (Thrill Jockey)
      3. Allen Toussaint – American Tunes (Nonesuch)
      4. William Tyler – Modern Country (Merge)

      1. Underworld – Barbara Barbara, We Face A Shining Future (underworldlive.com/Caroline)

      1. Matt Valentine – Blazing Grace (Timelag/Child Of Microtones)
      2. Various Artists – Songs To Fill The Air (WFMU)

      1. Various Artists – Day Of The Dead (4AD)
      2. Ryley Walker & Charles Rumback – Dhoodan (Dead Oceans)
      3. Tony Joe White – Rain Crow (Yeproc)
      4. White Denim – Stiff (Downtown)
      5. Woods – City Sun Eater In The River Of Light (Woodsist)
      6. Olivia Wyatt + Bitchin Bajas – Sailing A Sinking Sea (Drag City)
      7. Neil Young & The Promise Of The Real – Earth (Reprise)

Bob Dylan and Eric Clapton score Top 10 Albums

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Bob Dylan and Eric Clapton have both scored Top 10 albums on both sides of the Atlantic.

In the UK album chart, Dylan’s new Fallen Angels album debuts at No 5 with Clapton’s latest, I Still Do, entering the chart at No 6.

In America, these positions are reversed, with Clapton at No 5 and Dylan one place behind him.

According to Billboard, Clapton’s album sold 44,000 copies with a further 2,000 streams sold.

Dylan, meanwhile, sold 42,000 copies – nearly all from traditional album sales. Fallen Angels is Dylan’s 22nd Top 10 album.

Mudcrutch, featuring Tom Petty and his fellow Heartbreakers Mike Campbell and Benmont Tench, arrive at No 10 in the American album chart with their second album, 2.

The July 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Prince, plus Carole King, Paul Simon, case/lang/viers, Laurie Anderson, 10CC, Wilko Johnson, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Steve Gunn, Ryan Adams, Lift To Experience, David Bowie and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Paul Simon: “I was ambitious. I was also competitive”

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Paul Simon lifts the lid on his long and fascinating career in the latest edition of Uncut.

Interviewed in the July 2016 issue – which is now on sale in UK shops – Simon talks about his time in the UK folk clubs in the 1960s, his early run of solo albums, the Graceland controversy and his new album, Stranger To Stranger.

He also shares his memories of writing “The Sound Of Silence“, which turns 50 this year.

“I wrote it in the bathroom in my parent’s house because the room was tiled, so there was an echo,” he tells us. “I used to turn the lights off and leave the water running. It was like white noise, you know? My brother says it was amazing that I wrote it, because everything I’d written before that was way below it in quality. It was step up. It was probably one of those things when you’re in some kind of serotonin/dopamine flow, and it just comes out. But I was too young to know that those things happened. So I just took it as, “That’s a good one, I could close my act with this one.

“I remember I was just coming out of the phase where I was playing baseball for the schools that I was in,” he continues. “I was a good baseball player but I said, “Realistically, you’re never going to be a baseball player. You’re too small to be a baseball player. That’s over.” I know that I had a tremendous interest in making records as I did all those demos. I was an English Literature major in college, which I chose as my major because I had a crush on a girl who was an English major. I just liked playing music, I wanted to do that. I never envisioned that it would be a lifetimes worth of employment or that I would ever be having an interview like this, at this point.”

Were you ambitious at all?
“Yeah, I was. I wanted it. Also, I was competitive. I was competitive as an athlete. But there were no huge obstacles that I was facing other than I didn’t have a hit. But I wasn’t struggling. As a said, when I lived here I had tons of money for what I needed. When you’re a kid and you’re 21, 22 years old, unless something’s really gone wrong in your life, you’re pretty happy.”

You can read the full interview with Paul Simon – which includes his thoughts on why Simon & Garfunkel split up and why he didn’t see the Coen brothers film, Inside Llewyn Davis – in the new issue of Uncut, in shops and available to buy digitally now.

The July 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Prince, plus Carole King, Paul Simon, case/lang/viers, Laurie Anderson, 10CC, Wilko Johnson, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Steve Gunn, Ryan Adams, Lift To Experience, David Bowie and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

The End Of The Road: more line-up additions announced

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End Of The Road have announced the line-up for the Literary stage at this year’s festival.

It includes Brix Smith Start discussing her turbulent years with The Fall and former Uncut writer Barney Hoskyns reading from his new book on Woodstock.

The line-up is:

Vincent Thurkettle
Nina Lyon
Travis Elborough
Sally Bayley
Darren Hayman
Roddy Wombe
Cathi Unsworth
Barney Hoskyns

They join the festival’s musical bill who include Teenage Fanclub, Thurston Moore, Savages and Scritti Politti.

This year’s headliners are Joanna Newsom, Animal Collective and Bat For Lashes.

On the Comedy line-up, meanwhile Stewart Lee will be joined by Arthur Smith, Josie Long, Bridget Christie, Andy Zaltzman, John Finnemore and Hardeep Singh Kohli.

The festival takes place between September 2 – 4 at its ususal home in Larmer Tree Gardens.

Uncut will be hosting events in the Tipi Tent Stage again this year; check back here for updates.

You can find more details about tickets and the line-up at the festival’s website.

The July 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Prince, plus Carole King, Paul Simon, case/lang/viers, Laurie Anderson, 10CC, Wilko Johnson, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Steve Gunn, Ryan Adams, Lift To Experience, David Bowie and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Rahsaan Roland Kirk – The Case Of The Three-Sided Dream

Blind since early childhood thanks to poor medical treatment, Rahsaan Roland Kirk developed the gift of seeing with his ears. That’s what someone says in the course of The Case Of The Three-Sided Dream, and it seems to have been true. Kirk imagined the sounds he wanted to make, and then invented the means to create them. Another voice in this biographical documentary sums it up: “It was his one and only reality. It was his life.”

As a small boy he cut a length of garden hose and played it like a trumpet. When he took up the saxophone, one instrument wasn’t enough. To the tenor saxophone he added two exotic members of the same tribe, the manzello and the stritch. He hung the three horns around his neck, devised a method of cross-fingering between the keys, adapted his embouchure to take in the trio of mouthpieces, and played them all at once. When he appeared in the early 1960s, the sound was like nothing heard before: a keen blast of harmonised reeds that bore no resemblance to any known saxophone section. It was his true voice.

He also hung whistles and small sirens around his neck, to punctuate his performances with sudden blasts that kept his audience on their toes. He was a wonderful flautist, too, one of the few capable of playing real jazz on the instrument, through which he often hummed or sang at the same time as producing the instrument’s own notes (thus providing a career for Jethro Tull’s Ian Anderson). He sometimes played clarinet, cor anglais or harmonica, he kept a nose-flute handy, and occasionally he put a saxophone mouthpiece into a trumpet and played it that way. Having acquired the arcane skill of circular breathing, he never needed to stop playing; he recorded his “Concerto for Saxophone” in one 20-minute take, playing continuously throughout. His auditory perception went beyond the normal definition of acute. “We used to joke that he could hear around corners,” someone else says.

As if that were not enough, he also told stories. The first time I saw him, in Leicester in 1964, during his first British tour, he prefaced his piece “We Free Kings” with a long, rambling and utterly spellbinding tale about the three wise men on their way to Bethlehem, recasting it as a beatnik short story. Maybe Bruce Springsteen saw him around that time, because Springsteen’s way with a yarn – like the one about encountering Clarence Clemons on the Jersey shore – is straight out of Rahsaan’s playbook.

Unafraid of anything, he became more and more compelling. There’s a wonderful story about how, when the police tried to raid Ronnie Scott’s (where he was a favourite and frequent performer) one night, Kirk ordered the audience to blow the whistles he had handed out to them for participatory use in one of his tunes. Result: chaos and confusion and a swift retreat by the boys in blue.

Some people thought it was all a minstrel-show gimmick. It was anything but. Like Harry Partch, Moondog and La Monte Young, he was an American original. He could be uproariously entertaining, but he could also keep pace with the very finest exponents of modern jazz, such as the pianist Jaki Byard and the drummer Elvin Jones, with whom he recorded the great album Rip, Rig & Panic in 1965. Charles Mingus treasured his presence in his Jazz Workshop band: he’s an integral part of the roiling sessions that produced Mingus Oh Yeah! and Tonight At Noon.

But he was also political. His chant “Volunteered Slavery” formed part of the soundtrack to the civil rights era. In 1971, invited on to the Ed Sullivan Show, he brought with him a top-gun band including Mingus, Archie Shepp and Roy Haynes. Instead of the promised “My Cherie Amour”, they blasted into Mingus’s “Haitian Fight Song”. Sullivan’s response proved his chops for all time. “Wonderful!” he cried. “Wonderful! Wonderful!”

Four years later Kirk was half-paralysed by a sudden stroke. By 1977, while enduring kidney dialysis three times a week, he had devised a way of operating the saxophone single-handed and played and sang a beautiful “Goodbye Pork Pie Hat”, Mingus’s elegy for Lester Young, at one of Ken Kesey’s Poetic Hoohaws, still top-hatted and festooned with whistles and sirens. He died that same year, aged 42. It’s all there, and much more besides, with testimony from family, friends and fellow artists, in Adam Kahan’s loving and beautifully made film.

The July 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Prince, plus Carole King, Paul Simon, case/lang/viers, Laurie Anderson, 10CC, Wilko Johnson, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Steve Gunn, Ryan Adams, Lift To Experience, David Bowie and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

The Making Of “Hong Kong Garden” by Siouxsie And The Banshees

To celebrate Siouxsie Sioux’s birthday today, here’s a classic piece from the Uncut archives on the Making Of… the Banshees’ debut, “Hong Kong Garden”. This originally appeared in Uncut Take 132.

You could be forgiven for thinking that the local Chinese restaurant is a pretty innocuous subject for a song – particularly during the insurrectionist sloganeering of punk. But Siouxsie And The Banshees‘ first single attracted its own share of controversy. Lyrics like “Slanted eyes greet the bright sunrise, a race of bodies small in size…” met with accusations of racism, exacerbated by Siouxsie’s predilection for wearing swastika armbands on stage at the earliest Banshees’ shows. In fact, nothing could have been further from the truth: visiting her local takeaway in south east London, Siouxsie now remembers “being really upset by the local skinheads who gave the staff such a hard time.”

After two years unsuccessfully hunting for a record deal, Polydor signed the Banshees after hearing “Hong Kong Garden” on a Peel session. Incredibly, they found themselves booked into Olympic Studios with American soul producer Bruce Albertine. Rejecting Albertine’s version of “Hong Kong Garden”, they regrouped at the Fallout Shelter, a smaller studio in the basement of Island Records, with producer Steve Lillywhite, who subsequently produced the band’s debut album, The Scream.

“Hong Kong Garden” reached No 7 in the charts in August 1978 – “it should have been higher!” claims bassist Steven Severin. But at least, admits Siouxsie, “it paved the way for us to do what we wanted…”

Radiohead live!

The sign on the auditorium door reads, “Radiohead kindly request no crowd surfing or moshing. Thank you.” Such considerations are, you’d imagine, relatively uncommon among rock bands. But as we have come to learn, Radiohead are not exactly anyone’s idea of a conventional rock band. As their first London show in four years ably demonstrates, commendably they still have a tremendous capacity to surprise; tonight’s show is never less than exciting, its twists and turns through the band’s canon often thrilling and digressive. They cover a lot of ground in two and a half hours, and the scope of their set allows out every iteration of Radiohead its moment in the spotlight.

Satisfyingly, car park rave Radiohead (“The Gloaming”, “Identikit”), folky Radiohead (“Separator”, “Present Tense”), Led Zeppelin Radiohead (“Talk Show Host”, “Myxomatosis”) and others are present and correct tonight. Though much of the material is drawn from their post 2000 catalogue – an extended period of wilful experimentation and dramatic reinvention – they still dip back into their earliest days. We don’t get “Creep” – they played that in Paris earlier in the week – but we do get “My Iron Lung” and a stunning version of “Exit Music (For A Film)” that is met by the audience in hushed, awed silence.

All these competing Radioheads jostling for air is a reflection that, in 2016, they have a number of public images and historic responsibilities they must try and reconcile. In much the same way A Moon Shaped Pool, released three weeks ago, found them mining their back catalogue while obstinately pushing their compositional skills forward. “We have a long history of writing songs and having them hang around unrecorded for years,” Jonny Greenwood told Uncut in 2012. He specifically cited “Burn The Witch” (dating from the Kid A sessions) and “Present Tense” (debuted at Thom Yorke’s Latitude show in 2009) – both of which, finally, saw the light of day on A Moon Shaped Pool, along with “True Love Waits”, first aired back in 1995. This is not unusual – both “Nude” and “The Daily Mail” also experienced lengthy gestations – but in the context of Radiohead’s now constant state of motion seems a little incongruous. To some extent, you suspect Radiohead thrive on such contradictions: Greenwood, after all, has famously denounced the guitar as old-fashioned yet still favours the Ondes Martentot – an instrument dating from the 1920s.

With its talk of “low flying panic attack” and “avoid all eye contact”, “Burn The Witch” feels much closer to the paranoid, nervy Radiohead of old. But it’s a testament to Jonny Greenwood’s blossoming second career as a soundtrack composer that it flies – the nagging strings underscoring the sense of menace in Yorke’s lyrics. It is an effective opener to their set, with Greenwood sawing away on his guitar with a bow. They play the first five songs from A Moon Shaped Pool in sequence – as they have done on previous dates – which could be a risky move but here simply showcases the diversity and richness of the songs. “Burn The Witch” gives way to the haunting “Daydreaming”, which is followed by the swoon of “Decks Dark” and the warm folky stylings of “Desert Island Disk” replaced by the motorik thrust of “Ful Stop”. The transition to “Lotus Flower” is striking: emboldened, this King Of Limbs track is given propulsive energy and a muscular funkiness.

Sandwiched between the skittering beats of “Lotus Flower” and “The Gloaming”, the mid-Nineties couplet of “Talk Show Host” and “My Iron Lung” sit slightly awkwardly. There is no denying their fan appeal: they’re both met with rousing cheers. “Exit Music (For A Film)” and “Separator” make a more favourable fit while the move into “Identikit” and “The Numbers” is smooth and organic. This tour has been notable for the way Radiohead have dusted down gems from the back of the cupboard. Although they might not quite be up there with Neil Young playing “Thrasher” or “Vampire Blues” for the first time in 40 years, tonight’s tour debuts for “Myxomatosis” and “Planet Telex” are enthusiastically received.

Critically, for a set that showcases assorted sides of Radiohead’s career, across this 25 song stretch, each member of the band is given a chance to shine. Yorke, inevitably, provides a strong focus – hey, there are even some LOLs during a glitch in the start of “Nude”, where he asks, “Is it buggered?” or mugging shamelessly, suggested “Let’s spend the night here and play everything!” Elsewhere, there is Thom dancing to content with. But otherwise while eyes may be on the ever-inventive Greenwood – folded over his piano, pressing buttons on a wall of equipment stacked to his left or attacking his guitar with his bow – there is strong work being done elsewhere on stage. Colin Greenwood has something of the John McVie about him: staunch, understated, masterly. Philip Selway, meanwhile, is a generous, adaptable drummer. Perhaps Ed O’Brien is tonight’s most undervalued contributor. His guitar lines add depth and texture to the songs while his tech intrusions add subtle but compelling nuance to the songs. He is the last man left on stage when the band finish their main set, hunched over some gadget on the floor, tweaking a sample of Yorke’s voice on “Everything In Its Right Place”.

Bring on tonight!

Follow me on Twitter @MichaelBonner

Radiohead’s set list, May 26, 2016:

Burn The Witch
Daydreaming
Decks Dark
Desert Island Disk
Ful Stop
Lotus Flower
Talk Show Host
My Iron Lung
The Gloaming
Exit Music (For A Film)
Separator
Identikit
The Numbers
Myxomatosis
Reckoner
Idioteque
Everything In Its Right Place

Encore:
Morning Mr. Magpie
2 + 2 = 5
Nude
Planet Telex
There There

Encore 2:
Present Tense
You and Whose Army?
Paranoid Android

The July 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Prince, plus Carole King, Paul Simon, case/lang/viers, Laurie Anderson, 10CC, Wilko Johnson, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Steve Gunn, Ryan Adams, Lift To Experience, David Bowie and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Metallica – Kill Em All/Ride The Lightning

Among major acts, Metallica seem late to the game of releasing ridiculously overstuffed editions of canonic albums. To be fair, though, they did anticipate the current deluge with 1993’s Live Shit: Binge And Purge, an exhaustive set that came packaged in a facsimile flight case and really should have come with its own roadie. Fans can now fill their man caves with these deluxe editions of the band’s first two albums: Kill Em All contains four vinyl records – a remaster of the 1983 original, a double live LP recorded in Paris in 1984 and a three-track “Jump In The Fire” picture disc – plus three more CDs with radio interviews, rough mixes, rarities and further live and archival finds. They’re accompanied by a DVD of two more 1983 gigs, books of photos and lyrics, and a patch for your favourite denim vest. Ride The Lightning – which draws its trove of live material from six shows, including the band’s Donington debut in 1985 – now sprawls over four LPs, six CDs and one DVD, plus books and posters.

Such lavish displays of generosity may seem absurd to middle-aged headbangers who spent their adolescence wearing out their cassette versions on crappy car stereos and worse Walkmans. But even the doubters will be impressed with the remastering work on songs that didn’t need to sound so grotty to set new standards for speed and power.

Recorded just weeks after the band replaced Dave Mustaine with Kirk Hammett, Kill Em All would change the shape of things to come with its exhilarating fusion of American hardcore and British heavy metal at its most bruising. Three decades later, it may be hard to hear Metallica with undamaged ears but the full-throttle thrash of “Whiplash” remains revelatory – here is where Metallica finds the unholy nexus of Black Flag and Venom.

Released in 1984, Ride The Lightning is topped only by 1986’s Master Of Puppets in the estimation of those who believe the band’s wider ambitions would soon get the better of them. Of course, the album also features their first quasi-ballad in “Fade To Black” and their earliest nine-minute epic in “The Call Of Ktulu”. But all the songs here display the firepower, dexterity and drive to innovate that prevailed before “Enter Sandman” introduced a more broad-strokes variety of bombast.

Nor do these songs’ lowest-fidelity live renditions – with the Donington recordings being spectacularly sludgy – dull the impact of early masterstrokes like “Jump In The Fire” and “Am I Evil?”. Indeed, since they more accurately approximate the experience of hearing the originals on a C90 covered in sloppily drawn devil signs, they may actually enhance the songs’ fundamental awesomeness.

The July 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Prince, plus Carole King, Paul Simon, case/lang/viers, Laurie Anderson, 10CC, Wilko Johnson, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Steve Gunn, Ryan Adams, Lift To Experience, David Bowie and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Pink Floyd postage stamps revealed!

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The Royal Mail are to release a set of Pink Floyd postage stamps.

10 new stamps will be issued on July 7, 2016.

Six will feature album sleeves: The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn, Atom Heart Mother, The Dark Side Of The Moon, Wish You Were Here, Animals and The Endless River.

A further four stamps within a miniature sheet commemorate the band’s live appearances.

These are:

1st Class: UFO Club, 1966
1st Class: The Dark Side of the Moon Tour, 1973
£1.52: The Wall Tour, 1981
£1.52: The Division Bell Tour, 1994

The Division Bell album cover previously appeared on a stamp in 2010.

The stamps are available to pre-order online from May 26 by clicking here. They will be available to purchase in 8,000 Post Offices from July 7.

The July 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Prince, plus Carole King, Paul Simon, case/lang/viers, Laurie Anderson, 10CC, Wilko Johnson, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Steve Gunn, Ryan Adams, Lift To Experience, David Bowie and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

The 17th Uncut Playlist Of 2016

Wish I had some of the new solo set from Date Palms’ Marielle Jakobsons to play you, but please enjoy some highly recommended work from… Floating Points! D D Dumbo! Cass McCombs! And Factory Floor!

Follow me on Twitter @JohnRMulvey

1 Psychic Temple – Plays Music For Airports (Bandcamp)

2 Autechre – Elseq 1 (Warp)

3 Van Morrison – It’s Too Late To Stop Now Vol II (Sony)

4 Jeff Beck – Loud Hailer (Rhino)

5 Floating Points – Kuiper EP (Pluto)

6 Black Disco – Night Express (Matsuli)

7 D D Dumbo – Satan (4AD)

8 Marielle V Jakobsons – Star Core (Thrill Jockey)

9 Psychic Temple – III (Asthmatic Kitty)

10 Various Artists – Modernism (Ace)

11 Cass McCombs – Mangy Love (Anti-)

12 Dylan Carlson – Falling With A Thousand Stars And Other Wonders From The House Of Albion (Self-Released)

13 Death In Vegas – Transmission (Drone Out)

14 Autechre – Elseq 2 (Warp)

15 Mary Lattimore & Jeff Zeigler – Music Inspired By Philippe Garrel’s Le Révélateur (Thrill Jockey)

16 Protein – The Secret Garden (Alien Transistor)

17 Factory Floor – Dial Me In (DFA)

18 Mega Bog – Happy Together (Soundcloud)

19 Laraaji & Sun Araw – Professional Sunflow (Superior Viaduct)

Wilco, Savages, Julia Holter and Suuns to curate Le Guess Who? festival

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Wilco, Savages, Julia Holter and Suuns are curating this year’s Le Guess Who? festival.

Celebrating its tenth edition, the festival takes place in Utrecht, The Netherlands, from November 10 – 13.

Wilco, Savages, Julia Holter and Suuns will curate their own programs – which will be announced in the months leading up to the festival.

The festival has also announced the first artists to perform in the general festival program.

These include Swans, Patty Waters, Dinosaur Jr., Digable Planets, Wooden Shjips, Raime, Cate Le Bon, The Comet is Coming, Ryley Walker and the world premiere of Lera Auerbach’s 72 Angels, performed by the Netherlands Chamber Orchestra and Raschèr Saxophone Quartet.

Also performing are St. Francis Duo (Stephen O’Malley with Steve Noble); Phurpa, The Dwarfs of East Agouza, Anna von Hausswolff, Jameszoo Quartet, Heron Oblivion, Nadja, Stara Rzeka, Richard Skelton, Guy One & The Polyversal Souls, Heather Leigh, Horse Lords, Ryan Sambol, a live special by DOODcast, and Scott Fagan, author of the long-lost soul and psych folk masterpiece South Atlantic Blues.

You can find more info on these artists by clicking here.

4-Day Festival Passes are available now for €105 (excluding service costs) through www.leguesswho.com. Day tickets will be available at a later date.

The July 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Prince, plus Carole King, Paul Simon, case/lang/viers, Laurie Anderson, 10CC, Wilko Johnson, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Steve Gunn, Ryan Adams, Lift To Experience, David Bowie and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.