Bob Dylan announces 36CD box set: The 1966 Live Recordings

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Bob Dylan is to release a 36 CD box set containing every known recording from his 1966 concert tours of the US, UK, Europe and Australia.

Bob Dylan: The 1966 Live Recordings will be released on Friday, November 11 by Columbia Records and Sony Music’s Legacy Recordings.

The material has been drawn from three main audio sources: soundboards, CBS Records mobile recordings and audience tapes.

“While doing the archival research for The Cutting Edge 1965-1966: The Bootleg Series Vol. 12, last year’s box set of Dylan’s mid-60s studio sessions, we were continually struck by how great his 1966 live recordings really are,” said Adam Block, President, Legacy Recordings. “The intensity of Bob’s live performances and his fantastic delivery of these songs in concert add another insightful component in understanding and appreciating the musical revolution Bob Dylan ignited some 50 years ago.”

Columbia/Legacy will also release Bob Dylan’s performance at the Royal Albert Hall from May 26, 1966 as an album entitled The Real Royal Albert Hall 1966 Concert, as a 2CD and 12″ 2LP collection on November 25.

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Here’s the tracklisting in full:

Bob Dylan: The 1966 Live Recordings
Disc 1 – Sydney, April 13, 1966 (Soundboard recorded by TCN 9 TV Australia)
Disc 2 – Sydney, April 13, 1966 (Soundboard recorded by TCN 9 TV Australia)
Disc 3 – Melbourne, April 20, 1966 (Soundboard / unknown broadcast)
Disc 4 – Copenhagen, May 1, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 5 – Dublin, May 5, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 6 – Dublin, May 5, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 7 – Belfast, May 6, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 8 – Belfast, May 6, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 9 – Bristol, May 10, 1966 (Soundboard / audience)
Disc 10 – Bristol, May 10, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 11 – Cardiff, May 11, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 12 – Birmingham, May 12, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 13 – Birmingham, May 12, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 14 – Liverpool, May 14, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 15 – Leicester, May 15, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 16 – Leicester, May 15, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 17 – Sheffield, May 16, 1966 (CBS Records recording)
Disc 18 – Sheffield, May 16, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 19 – Manchester, May 17, 1966 (CBS Records recording)
Disc 20 – Manchester, May 17, 1966 (CBS Records recording except Soundcheck / Soundboard)
Disc 21 – Glasgow, May 19, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 22 – Edinburgh, May 20, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 23 – Edinburgh, May 20, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 24 – Newcastle, May 21, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 25 – Newcastle, May 21, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 26 – Paris, May 24, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 27 – Paris, May 24, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 28 – London, May 26, 1966 (CBS Records recording)
Disc 29 – London, May 26, 1966 (CBS Records recording)
Disc 30 – London, May 27, 1966 (CBS Records recording)
Disc 31 – London, May 27, 1966 (CBS Records recordings)
Disc 32 – White Plains, NY, February 5, 1966 (Audience tape)
Disc 33 – Pittsburgh, PA, February 6, 1966 (Audience tape)
Disc 34 – Hempstead, NY, February 26, 1966 (Audience tape)
Disc 35 – Melbourne, April 19, 1966 (Audience tape)
Disc 36 – Stockholm, April 29, 1966 (Audience tape)

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Ask Julia Holter

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Ahead of a run of tour dates in November, Julia Holter will be answering your questions as part of our regular An Audience With… feature.

So is there anything you’d like us to ask the singer-songwriter?

What did she learn from working with Linda Perhacs?
She’s covered Crowded House, Roxy Music and Guillaume de Machaut’s 14th century composition “Je Vivroie Liement”; what’s the connection between the three?
How did her collaboration with Jean Michel Jarre come about?

Send up your questions by noon, Tuesday, October 4 to uncutaudiencewith@timeinc.com.

The best questions, and Julia’s answers, will be published in a future edition of Uncut magazine.

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Teenage Fanclub and September’s album highlights reviewed

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As you’re hopefully aware by now, our excellent new issue of Uncut is in UK shops, with revealing stories on The Specials, Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Peter Hook, the remarkable Shirley Collins and, of course, much, much more. If you’re in the USA, print editions of our first relaunch mag should now be reaching you: it’s the one with David Bowie on the cover, also featuring David Crosby, Margo Price, a hair-raising Lou Reed piece and, yes, lots more besides. Please let us know how you’re feeling about our new look and the changes to Uncut; as ever, we’d be very pleased to hear from you (email uncut_feedback@timeinc.com).

This week, it seems a good time to write a bit about some of my favourite albums of the last month. Teenage Fanclub’s unassuming rock masterclass of “Here”, many of you will already know about, I suspect. There is some sweet irony that no British band of their generation have grown into middle age as gracefully as the one lumbered with that absurdly short-termist name. Nevertheless, the Fanclub’s ninth album proper, and first in six years, might just be their best this millennium; a triangulation of mature soppiness, mitigated contentment and indelible tuneage.

As usual, the three frontmen get four songs each, and Norman Blake sets the tone with the terrific gush of “I’m In Love”. “There is pain in this world,” he notes conscientiously, but “It feels good when you’re close to me/That’s enough.” It’s Gerry Love, though, who ultimately steals the show, with his four songs best exemplifying the “Here” MO of adding a little fuzz and grunge into the twinkling constructs of harmonies and horns: check out the guitar break on the jazzish “The First Sight”. Not “Everything Flows”, exactly, but an endearingly restrained statement of intent.

2016 feels very much like a breakthrough year for the glut of adventurous folk guitarists who’ve been nurtured in the underground these past few years. As William Tyler, Steve Gunn and Ryley Walker gain mainstream kudos, the next tranche of players – Chuck Johnson, Marisa Anderson, Sarah Louise – are moving up a level. Witness Tulsa’s Dylan Golden Aycock, curator of the fine Scissor Tail label (he put out the fantastic Scott Hirsch album earlier this year) and the latest graduate of the Imaginational Anthems comps to assert himself. “Church Of Level” mostly finds Aycock respectfully expanding on Takoma School roots, moving towards the sort of chamber folk compositions mastered by James Blackshaw and Tyler himself, circa “Impossible Truth”. A bustle of drums augment the guitar solipsisms on “Lord It Over”, but the key weapon is subtly deployed pedal steel, giving downhome fingerpicking workouts like “Red Bud Valley II” a pleasing ethereal undercurrent.

Ever thought that “Sister Ray” was maybe a bit on the short side, and could be improved by some heavy Bo Diddley vibes? In that unlikely event, The Double’s debut record will be something of a dream come true, sustaining as it does a kind of elevated boom-chicka-boom drone for two sides and 40-odd minutes. It’s a pleasurable act of endurance to listen to “Dawn Of The Double” and, one assumes, even more of one to play. The pair behind this marathon are, though, serious operators, being drummer Jim White (The Dirty Three, Xylouris White et al) and guitarist Emmett Kelly (The Cairo Gang), who first crossed paths in the rather more nuanced environs of Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy’s band. The vinyl-only format enhances radical garage-rock credibility, albeit interrupting the brutalist genius of the whole endeavour. How about enlisting a Glenn Branca-style Guitar Army to hammer the point home even more emphatically?

Back in the high summers of acid-folk a decade ago, the calmness exuded by Kayla Cohen in her songs would doubtless be romanticised as in some way uncanny. Nowadays, perhaps fortunately, the sort of candlelit Laurel Canyon fare she purveys as Itasca doesn’t need that kind of witchy qualification; it’s just a lovely collection of songs, in which the serenity of voice and understatement of band create a humane intimacy rather than anything more mystical. Not much happens on the deceptively tranquil “Open To Chance”, even though it presents fractionally fuller instrumentation than on Cohen’s previous underground releases. But the charms of songs like “Henfight” and “Carousel” accumulate steadily, insidiously, over repeat plays. One to file, rewardingly, between Meg Baird and Paradise Of Bachelors labelmates, The Weather Station.

How best to salute the majesty of Robbie Basho: cosmic American folk maestro; New Age guitar traveller; heroic yodeller? The cosmopolitan bunch assembled by Arborea’s Buck Curran for “Basket Full Of Dragons: A Tribute To Robbie Basho Vol II” deploy a variety of strategies, using both repurposed Basho tunes and home-baked homages, with some pretty mixed results. Staunch guitar technicians like Glenn Jones, Chuck Johnson and German fanboy Steffen Basho-Junghans provide a faithful bedrock, but many of the vocal interpretations have a gothic, mimsy affect, Twelve Hides’ “California Raga” veering close to All About Eve territory. The strongest contributions steer clear of guitars, with Syrian oud player Tammam Saeed foregrounding Basho’s eastern predilections, and Mike Tamburo discovering that a hammer dulcimer, of all things, brilliantly captures the maestro’s spectral intensity.

Reissues, now. The fraught business of waiting on Neil Young’s whims must have stymied most chances Crazy Horse had of developing their own career – though, of course, losing the gifted Danny Whitten didn’t help. Nevertheless, the arrival of Frank ‘Poncho’ Sampedro evidently emboldened Ralph Molina and Billy Talbot to have another go, following 1971’s fine, Whitten-fronted “Crazy Horse” and two forgettable sets, featuring radically reconfigured lineups, in 1972. Much of “Crazy Moon”, back on vinyl for the first time in forever, dates from around the same time as the “Zuma” sessions, in 1974, but it would sit on the shelf ’til 1978.

There’s a fair bit to ensnare Neil completists, given his prominent role on five tracks. The strongest is Sampedro’s “Downhill”, a quintessential Crazy Horse trudge with some penetrating Old Black action. Sampedro turns out to be the best songwriter of the trio; his countryish “Too Late Now” is another standout, with roistering piano from Barry Goldberg. Ben Keith and David Briggs also help out and, even if the lyrics don’t reward forensic study (“She’s Hot” and “Dancin’ Lady” being indicative titles), Crazy Moon emerges as an enjoyable reassertion of a band’s core values. A couple of Molina attempts at soft-rock illustrate that a desire to stretch those values is, at best, ill-advised.

For adventurous music fans happy to let labels do their crate-digging for them, the recent market in 1960s and ’70s Ethiopian music has provided a rich seam of new discoveries. As the Ethiopiques compilations on Buda Musique proved, a ravishing party music scene thrived under a censorious dictatorship, harbouring stars like Mahmoud Ahmed, Mulatu Astatke and the local James Brown surrogate, Alemayehu Eshete. Organist Hailu Mergia played with many of these, as part of Swinging Addis’ hottest combo, The Walias, but his music as a bandleader only gained prominence when the Awesome Tapes imprint reissued their Tche Belew (1977) in 2014. Mergia stayed in America after a Walias tour in 1981, becoming a taxi driver in Washington DC. Slowly, though, the deep riches of his career are being rediscovered.

“Wede Harer Guzo”, a hitherto-unknown cassette from ’78, finds him hooking up with a purportedly hipper group, the Dahlak Band, heading deeper into a kind of chant-laden, Arabic-scale, laidback funk – check how Mergia improvises over a delirious ascending bassline on the stand-out, “Almaz Eyasebkush”. It’s easy to fetishise this sort of music as exotic and obscurantist, but Wede Harer Guzo refutes that tokenism with every wonderful track: better think of it as kin to the likes of Jimmy Smith, Jackie Mittoo, The Upsetters and The Meters.

The story of Syrinx, told on “Tumblers From The Vault (1970-1972)”, is one that tells of how pop, the avant-garde and strong classical aspirations could get in a fruitful tangle on the cusp of the ’70s. John Mills-Cockell, the Canadian band’s leader, had a hinterland in trad rock (his early band, Kensington Market, were produced by Felix Pappalardi at Electric Ladyland). He had also, though, studied electronic music as an academic discipline – a key to understanding Syrinx’s two beguiling albums, collected here. The synth baroque of Wendy Carlos, and Terry Riley’s timelag meditations are useful reference points, but it’s still hard to imagine, at 45 years’ remove, quite how alien “Syrinx” (1970) and “Long Lost Relatives” (1971) must have sounded upon release, given it’s generally easier to compare Mills-Cockell’s music with subsequent electronica.

The self-titled debut is stately and subdued, with a processional glide to the likes of “Chant For Your Dragon King” (as everything here, vocal-free) that pre-empts both Side 2 of Low and the encroaching New Age. “Long Lost Relatives”, meanwhile, is flightier and more whimsical, Doug Pringle’s electronic sax lines often to the fore. The squiggliness can sometimes feel like a conservatoire prank, but Mills-Cockell’s romantically-inclined melodies are ravishing; like an implausible mash-up of Michael Nyman, Arthur Russell and Stereolab.

Watch Justin Vernon join The National’s Bryce and Aaron Dessner on-stage in Paris

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Justin Vernon joined The National‘s Bryce Dessner on stage last night (September 25) in Paris to perform a number of songs.

Vernon joined Dessner for his Invisible Bridge concert, which took place over the weekend at the Philharmonie.

Dessner was also joined for the performance by his brother, Aaron.

Vernon performed two new songs – “33 ‘God’” and “00000 Million” – from Bon Iver‘s upcoming album, 22, A Million, which is released on Friday, September 30.

Watch footage of “33 ‘God’” and “00000 Million” below.

You can read our exclusive interview with Justin Vernon in the new issue of Uncut, which is in UK shops now and also available to buy digitally

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Watch Weyes Blood’s new video for “Do You Need My Love”

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Weyes Blood have released a video for “Do You Need My Love“.

The song is taken from forthcoming album Front Row Seat To Earth.

Weyes Blood have also added two new shows to their forthcoming tour itinerary: at La Graviere in Geneva, Switzerland on November 20 and at the London Field Brewhouse on November 22.

Weyes Blood tour dates:

Tue. Oct. 4 – San Francisco, CA @ Swedish American Hall (with TOPS)
Wed. Oct. 5 – Santa Barbara, CA @ Soho Music Club (with TOPS)
Thu. Oct. 6 – San Diego, CA @ Soda Bar (with TOPS)
Wed. Oct. 19 – Pomona, CA @ Acerogami (with TOPS)
Thu. Oct. 27 – Boston, MA @ First Baptist Church
Fri. Oct. 28 – Montreal, QC @ Drones
Sat. Oct. 29 – Toronto, ON @ Baby G
Sun. Oct. 30 – Detroit, MI @ Trinosophes
Mon. Oct. 31 – Chicago, IL @ The Hideout
Tue. Nov. 1 – Bloomington, IN @ Blockhouse
Wed. Nov. 2 – Nashville, TN @ Soft Junk
Thu. Nov. 3 – Knoxville, TN @ Pilot Light
Fri. Nov. 4 – Atlanta, GA @ Mammal Gallery
Sat. Nov. 5 – Asheville, NC @ The Mothlight
Sun. Nov. 6 – Raleigh, NC @ Kings
Mon. Nov. 7 – Washington, DC @ Haushouse
Tue. Nov. 8 – Baltimore, MD @ Floristree
Wed. Nov. 9 – Philadelphia, PA @ Everybody Hits
Thu. Nov. 10 – Brooklyn, NY @ The Park Church Co-op
Sat. Nov. 12 – Utrecht, NL @ Le Guess Who? Festival
Mon. Nov. 14 – Hamburg, DE @ Kleiner Donner
Tue. Nov. 15 – Jena, DE @ Glashaus
Wed. Nov. 16 – Berlin, DE @ ACUD
Thu. Nov. 17 – Amsterdam, NL @ OCCII
Fri. Nov. 18 – Luxembourg, LUX @ De Gudde Wellen
Sat. Nov. 19 – St Gallen, DE @ Palace
Sun. Nov 20 – Geneva, CH @ La Graviere
Mon. Nov. 21 – Paris, FR @ Espace B
Tue. Nov. 22 – London, UK @ London Field Brewhouse
Wed. Nov. 23 – Manchester, UK @ The Castle
Thu. Nov. 24 – Sheffield, UL @ Bungalows & Bears
Fri. Nov. 25 – Glasgow, UK @ The Hug & Pint
Mon. Nov. 28 – Brussels, BE @ Botanique (Witloof Bar)
Wed. Nov. 30 – Barcelona, ES @ Sidecar
Thu. Dec. 1 – Madrid, ES @ Siroco
Fri. Dec. 2 – Lisbon, PT @ ZDB
Sat. Dec. 3 – Guimaraes, PT @ CCVF

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Fleetwood Mac are working on a new studio album

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Christine McVie has confirmed Fleetwood Mac are working on a new album.

The bad have not released a studio album since 2003’s Say You Will, but McVie has told Rolling Stone that they have already recorded a batch of songs and they are hoping to work on more in the future.

“We cut seven songs in the studio already for the start of a brand-new studio album, which we did probably nearer two years ago,” she said. “We shelved that temporarily and then went on the road and did the tour. And now, actually, I think we’re going back in, in October to try to finish it off. Stevie (Nicks) hasn’t participated yet, but hope springs eternal. She’s going on a solo tour at the moment.

Lindsey (Buckingham) and I, we have plenty of songs,” McVie continued. “There are tons more in the bag that we have yet to record. And they’re fantastic. So we’re going to carry on and try to finish the record. And then maybe if Stevie doesn’t want to be part of that then we can go out and just do some smaller concerts.”

When asked if they would consider playing without Nicks, she added: “As a four-piece, yeah. With a view of doing a huge world tour after that, with Stevie.”

Fleetwood Mac have recently reissued their 1982 album, Mirage. The deluxe remastered version of the LP includes a three-CD and DVD set with a disc of B-sides and a live set culled from two nights at the LA Forum in October 1982. You can read the Uncut review of Mirage by clicking here.

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Kraftwerk announce 11-date UK tour

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Kraftwerk have announced details for their first full UK tour for 13 years, taking their 3D live show on 11 dates across the country.

The tour begins on June 9 at Glasgow’s Royal Concert Hall, and includes Edinburgh, Birmingham, Bristol, Sheffield, and more, with two shows in London.

Kraftwerk will play:
Glasgow Royal Concert Hall (June 9)
Edinburgh Usher Hall (10)
Liverpool Philharmonic Hall (11)
Birmingham Symphony Hall (13)
Gateshead Sage (14)
Sheffield City Hall (15)
Bristol Colston Hall (17)
Nottingham Royal Concert Hall (18)
Manchester Bridgwater Hall (19)
London Royal Albert Hall (21-22)

Tickets go on sale at 10am on Friday September 30 from gigandtours.com.

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Led Zeppelin – The Complete BBC Sessions

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In 1969, while Led Zeppelin criss-crossed America in their bid to win the West, they waged a quite different battle back home – a battle of the airwaves. Wary of TV studios, and disdainfully uninterested in releasing singles, Zeppelin relied on vital radio exposure from influential DJs like John Peel and Alexis Korner to get their music heard. The sessions they recorded for Peel’s Top Gear in particular gave them a direct line to vinyl-buying UK rock fans, laying the groundwork for Led Zeppelin II and Led Zeppelin III to top the album charts in 1970. Never mind red snappers and trashed hotel rooms; in Britain, Zep’s vertiginous rise had more to do with transistor radios.

The sessions that Peel, Korner and other BBC presenters played on their programmes weren’t intended to be heard more than twice. An initial broadcast, a repeat a fortnight later and the session would be consigned to the BBC archives (or in the case of Korner’s March ’69 World Service session, wiped). But as the historical significance of these exclusive Zeppelin recordings became apparent over time, years of sustained bootlegging ensued. Finally, in 1997, Jimmy Page supervised and produced an official compilation (BBC Sessions) that presented 14 tracks from Zeppelin’s ’69 sessions alongside a Radio 1 In Concert performance from April ’71. Not strictly part of the band’s core canon, but a million-seller nonetheless, that 2CD collection has now been expanded into a more definitive anthology that contains an extra 49 minutes of music. The Complete BBC Sessions is available as a 3CD package, a 5LP vinyl edition and an all-encompassing boxset.

You can hear an unreleased version of “What Is And What Should Never Be” from The Complete BBC Sessions by clicking here

It’s the story, in essence, of a young band making a dramatic entrance onto the late-’60s rock scene. If you’re curious to know how Zeppelin were able to leapfrog virtually all of their British competitors in the space of a handful of radio appearances, their turbo-charged versions of “Communication Breakdown”, “How Many More Times” and Eddie Cochran’s “Somethin’ Else” will provide you with a convincing answer. Possessing a ferocious guitarist, a demon bassist, a devastatingly powerful drummer and a singer who sounded like some kind of hermaphrodite banshee, the nascent Led Zeppelin must simply have exploded out of the radio. And although Page has sometimes implied that the BBC’s technicians were out of their depth, unable to comprehend Zeppelin’s use of volume and dynamics, that’s certainly not how it sounds on The Complete BBC Sessions. They’re well-recorded, amped-up, razor-sharp and explosive. The effect is like hearing mono versions of songs from the first two albums that stretch out and improvise, visiting new places via unfamiliar routes. And the energy of them! It’s clear that Zeppelin were impatient to kick down doors and build a word-of-mouth reputation.

The major selling point of The Complete BBC Sessions is the eight previously unreleased tracks that comprise the bulk of the third CD and the fifth vinyl LP. They include an 11-minute, darkly atmospheric “Dazed And Confused” from the June ’69 concert at the Playhouse Theatre that yielded four songs on the original BBC Sessions, as well as enjoyably demented versions of “Communication Breakdown” recorded for Top Gear in March ’69 and In Concert in April ’71. “What Is And What Should Never Be”, another missing song from the ’71 show, is also included now, and so is a prototype airing of it in mid-’69 that suffers from unfortunate tuning problems. Pre-release news stories earlier this summer focused on the discovery of a rare track from the long-lost Korner session, “Sunshine Woman”, salvaged from a fan’s bootleg recording. But while this is given pride of place as the final song in the set, it doesn’t live up to the advance publicity. Zeppelin had several blues-rock numbers in a similar vein during ’69 (among them “Bring It On Home”, “We’re Gonna Groove” and “The Girl I Love She Got Long Black Wavy Hair”), and only the first was deemed good enough for a place on Led Zeppelin II. The prosaic “Sunshine Woman”, despite John Paul Jones’s barrelhouse piano-playing, was not in the same league and was presumably dropped soon afterwards.

Offering week-by-week documentary evidence of Zeppelin’s meteoric rise and early creative growth, The Complete BBC Sessions is probably, in its enhanced and remastered state, as much as can realistically be expected to be issued from the Corporation’s vaults. The only pity is that negotiating one’s way around the three hours and 20 minutes of music is such a fiddly business. A chronological tracklisting would have made much more sense; as it is, it’s hard to trace the momentum of Zeppelin from session to session without skipping back and forth between discs and consulting the booklet for recording dates. And since that momentum changed the course of rock history, it does feel as though somebody has missed a trick.

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

The Jam announce huge memorabilia auction

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The Jam are auctioning off all the items from their memorabilia exhibition to raise money for charity.

About the Young Idea, the band’s collection of memorabilia, is currently on display in Liverpool’s Cunard Building; the exhibition closes on October 6 then the auction will take place on site on October 7 and 8.

The collection contains over 800 lots, all of which will be sold with a possible sale total of over £500,000.

“This is an unbelievable collection and some of the lots will be dream keepsakes to fans of the band and fans of British music,” said Chris Surfleet from Adam Partridge Auctioneers and Valuers.

“The drum kit could be yours for £20,000-£30,000. We have every record pressing from every one of their releases, all original recording acetates, tour jackets and clothing worn by the band during their time together 78-82, including one of Weller’s pin stripe suits and a Wembley dressing gown,” Surfleet added.

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Hope Sandoval & The Warm Inventions share new track featuring Kurt Vile

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Hope Sandoval and The Warm Inventions will release their third album, Until The Hunter on their own Tendril Tales label via INgrooves on November 4.

To coincide, the band – comprising Mazzy Star’s Hope Sandoval and My Bloody Valentine’s Colm O’Coisog – have released the first single from the album – “Let Me Get There”, a collaboration with Kurt Vile.

Says Vile, “It was a total honor to sing along to a beautifully hypnotic soul groove with heavyweights like Hope, Colm, and all the other top notch musos. To respond to Hope’s call in song of letting her get there felt right and real and gave me chills while singing, even though I knew they already got there years before I walked in the building.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGtDIEvg0Ag

The new album also features guest performances from Dirt Blue Gene, singer Mariee Sioux and street musician Michael Masley.

Until the Hunter is Hope Sandoval and the Warm Inventions first album since 2009 and first release since Mazzy Star released their 2013 album Seasons Of Your Day. The album was mixed at Cauldron Studios in Dublin and mastered by longtime engineer Mark Chalecki in Los Angeles.

Into the Trees
The Peasant
A Wonderful Seed
Let Me Get There
Day Disguise
Treasure
Salt of the Sea
The Hiking Song
Isn’ t It True
I Took A Slip
Liquid Lady

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Little Men

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The pitfalls of urban living have made their mark on the films of Ira Sachs. In Love Is Strange, Alfred Molina and John Lithgow played a New York couple forced to live apart due to circumstances; for his new film, Little Men, Sachs focuses on a tug-of-war over a Brooklyn dress shop. Admittedly, a film whose narrative pivots around gentrification and rising rents might look like indie middle-class navel gazing, but the strength of Little Men lies in its canny casting and Sachs’ way with quiet, emotional beats.

Greg Kinnear plays Brian, an actor, who moves into his late father’s house in Brooklyn with his family – psychotherapist wife Kathy (Jennifer Ehle) and 13 year-old son Jacob (Theo Taplitz). Considering the erratic nature of Brian’s work, it is Kathy who has carried the family financially; the newly inherited apartment provides some relief from that burden. There’s a dress shop on the ground floor, run by a Chilean woman, Leonor (Paulina García), whose friendship with Brian’s father meant she enjoyed low rent. Encouraged by his sister, however, Brian proposes to hike the rent in line with the area’s increasing upward mobility.

Kinnear, Ehle and García are all predictably low-key and excellent; but the heavy lifting is done by Tapliz and Michael Barbieri, who plays Leonor’s son, Tony. The same age, Tony and Jacob become inseparable; but as their families fall out, their friendship becomes tested. Barbieri in particular is superb: he has a soulfulness and petulance, like a kind of teen Pacino.

Follow me on Twitter @MichaelBonner

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

The 32nd Uncut Playlist Of 2016

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A quick reminder, before we dig into this week’s motherlode, that the new issue of Uncut is on sale now, and features some excellent writing on The Specials, Bob Weir, Bon Iver, Shirley Collins, Leonard Cohen and more, plus a CD which puts a lot of our recent playlists into physical form. Also I reviewed an amazing Björk gig the other night, if you haven’t seen that one.

You’ve probably heard the new Cohen track by now, and may have a clearer idea of why I’m so taken with that album, but I’ve pasted it in the list below just in case. Other new highlights this week come from the Danny Brown album, in the shape of his collaboration with Kendrick Lamar and Earl Sweatshirt that’s my favourite hip hop track of 2016; NxWorries and MV & EE; the very compelling Norah Jones album; and, last but very much not least, Hope Sandoval’s duet with Kurt Vile. Thanks!

Follow me on Twitter @JohnRMulvey

1 Steve Hauschildt – Strands (Thrill Jockey)

2 Neil Young – Indian Givers (Youtube)

3 Loscil – Monument Builders (Kranky)

4 Kim Myhr – Bloom (Hubro)

5 Wolf People – Ruins (Secretly Canadian)

6 Danny Brown – Atrocity Exhibition (Warp)

7 Lambchop – FLOTUS (City Slang/Merge)

8 Leonard Cohen – You Want It Darker (Sony)

9 NxWorries (Anderson Paak & Knxwledge) – Yes Lawd! (Stones Throw)

10 MV & EE – Feel Alright (Woodsist)

11 The Growlers – City Club (Cult)

12 Nick Jonah Davis – House Of Dragons (Thread)

13 Julius Eastman – Femenine (Frozen Reeds

14 Last Of The Easy Riders – Last Of The Easy Riders (Agitated)

15 Botany – Deepak Verbera (Western Vinyl)

16 Omni Trio – Renegade Snares (Moving Shadow)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dkWrzrcv738

17 Björk – Vulnicura (One Little Indian)

18 Various Artists – The Man Who Fell To Earth: OST (UMC)

19 Norah Jones – Day Breaks (Blue Note)

20 Thurston Moore – Chelsea’s Kiss (Blank Editions)

21 Endless Boogie – Rollin’ And Tumblin’ (Bandcamp)

22 Dirty Projectors – Keep Your Name (Domino)

23 The Notwist – Superheroes, Ghostvillains & Stuff (Alien Transistor)

24 Hope Sandoval & The Warm Inventions – Until The Hunter (Tendril Tales)

Marc Almond: “The teenage me would have been a bit in awe of the person I am now”

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Marc Almond discusses his career and his new anthology, Trials Of Eyeliner, in the latest issue of Uncut, dated November 2016 and out now.

The Soft Cell and Marc & The Mambas singer recalls his artistic ambitions when he was a teenager, and explains that he would have “laughed off the idea” of a successful chart career.

“Even though I was an obsessed music fan from a very early age,” Almond tells Uncut, “and was in my first local band aged 17 playing rock and hits of the day, I thought my career would take me in a different direction – art and experimental theatre.

“I’d never have dreamed that I would have become a pop star, appeared on Top Of The Pops, had two No 1s and had a successful musical career, still going strong after 35 years. I would have laughed off the idea. The me then would have been a bit in awe of the person I am now. I still think of myself as someone in the third person, ‘that other person’. I don’t take anything for granted.”

In the interview, Almond also discusses his influences, why he’s drawn to voices that sing of the margins and the lost artform of the single. The 10-disc Trials Of Eyeliner: Anthology 1979-2016 is also extensively reviewed in the new issue.

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Paul Weller: “It’s almost like a curse – music is all I can do in life”

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No longer Spokesman For A Generation, Weller is a revitalised solo artist, grappling with more introspective matters than political ones. “I really believe I’m just good at what I do. Playing guitar, singing songs and that’s about it,” he tells IESTYN GEORGE. Has his fire really gone out? Hardly… Originally published in NME’s 04/09/1993 issue, and later reproduced in Uncut’s Paul Weller Ultimate Music Guide.

Paul Weller and The Jam are on the cover of Uncut’s History Of Rock 1979 edition, in stores now or available to buy online.

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For Paul Weller, 1989 was a bad year. After 12 years of crafting some of the most memorable moments in British music history, he reached a creative dead-end. The Style Council, for a brief time regarded as the saviours of pop, looked out on their feet.

Five LPs along the line, the record company eventually drew proceedings to an untidy close by refusing to release an album adopting an out-and-out house direction. That, so it seemed, was that. Like Lydon, Strummer, Jones, Shelley and to a lesser extent Costello, yet another ’70s icon – perhaps the finest of them all – had fallen by the wayside before achieving true greatness. No more heroes – that was their catchphrase…

Fast forward to July 1993 and Weller’s appearance on Jools Holland’s BBC2 series, Later…. Looking tanned and sturdy, he rips the place apart from the first chord of “Sunflower” to the dying moments of “Has My Fire Really Gone Out?”. Sinewy, rough-edged riffs compete with Steve White’s pounding drum assault. Weller confidently stomps around the studio floor wearing the broadest of smiles, his face soaked with sweat. For the first time in years, Paul Weller’s enjoying himself, dropping the mask of earnest singer-songwriter and just letting himself go in public.

But is this apparent return to form merely a nostalgic reflection of past glories? Sure, he’s arguably had a broader influence on current music than any other artist – from The Wonder Stuff and Ride through to Carter and Blur – but does he have anything new to offer?

_______________________

A month later we’re at The Manor, the Oxfordshire studio where Weller recently finished his second solo LP, Wild Wood. As the first single, “Sunflower”, suggests, it’s a blistering return to form. A spacious country house, fringed by greenery and a clear water stream, The Manor is home-from-home in a stately kind of way. We’re greeted on arrival by the generously waisted Kenny Wheeler – minder, gofer and moral support to the Weller clan for over 16 years. Still managed by his father John, Weller has kept this close-knit unit with him throughout his days with The Jam, the Council and, now, his solo career.

On first meeting, you can see why he relies so heavily on this extended family set-up. Much has been said about his shy, awkward manner in the past and the first thing you notice about him is the way his eyes dart uncomfortably around the room, like a cat looking for an escape route from the clutches of an over-zealous child.

Still, he makes conversation, trying you out for size. What do you think of the album? When do you want to do the interview? Where do you want to do the photos? And gradually, with the formalities over, you begin to realise the characteristically fragile Weller persona is not as accurate as it first seems. He’s no after-dinner speaker for sure, but there’s a quiet calm about him, and a warmth of character that overrides his initial shyness.

No longer the spokesman for a generation, political firebrand nor champion of causes, Paul Weller, the bloke, sits cross-legged on the living room floor next to a pile of Stax and Motown rarities, talking comfortably about the past, quite obviously at ease with himself.

But to understand his current state of serenity, it’s important to note the desperate trough he’d sunk into with The Style Council. A rapidly disillusioned Weller had already decided to split the band by the time Confessions Of A Pop Group was released in July ’88.

“I couldn’t say it was a mutual decision,” he explains, “but I wanted to get out.” Things had become stale and he and songwriting partner Mick Talbot were bored by it all. The reaction to Confessions… made him feel that he’d become isolated from the real world. He thought it was the best record he’d ever made – critics and fans thought otherwise. It threw him that he’d become so far removed from his audience.

“After The Style Council, I felt totally unleashed,” he says, looking wistfully into the middle-distance. “I had no record deal, no publishing deal – for the first time since I was 18 I was a free man. But I went through a period when I thought, ‘What do I do now?’ because I’d spent so many years doing the same thing, going down to the studio every day, and when you haven’t got anything to work towards, it can really throw you. I had to just have some time to decide what I wanted to do. It was probably the first time I’d had the opportunity to stand still and take stock of what I was doing in life.”

In praise of Playing With Fire by Spacemen 3

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In Playing The Bass With Three Left Hands, his superb memoir of his time as a member of Spacemen 3 and Spiritualized, Will Carruthers remembers his first interview and photo shoot for a music magazine. It was, it transpired, illustrative of the band’s general behaviour. The interview took place in the bedroom of his flat in Rugby; also present were his Spacemen 3 co-conspirators, Peter Kember (aka Sonic Boom) and Jason Pierce. “Pete did all the talking, while me and Jason just sat there saying nothing,” Carruthers writes. “Pete handled the press fairly well. He talked about drugs quite a bit, and we were fine with that too. When the photographer took the photos, I was completely stoned on hash and wine. All the way through the photo session, the cameraman kept saying, ‘Just try to open your eyes a bit more.’ I suppose we looked a bit stoned.”

The photo eventually also appeared on the rear sleeve of 1988’s Playing With Fire, the band’s third album and first to feature Carruthers. Playing With Fire was a creative highpoint for the band: a moment where the combative psych-metal of the band’s earliest recordings had been replaced by more delicate, elliptical textures. If the early albums – Sound Of Confusion, The Perfect Prescription – channelled MC5, the 13th Floor Elevators and the Cramps, by the time they came to record Playing With Fire, Spacemen 3 were drawing from a more diverse, exploratory pool of influences including John Cage, Steve Reich, the Velvet Underground and Kraftwerk. Although the album satisfyingly hits a number of marks – the way guitars on “Honey” are processed to make them resemble synthesizers, the soft-focus melodies pillowing “Come Down Softly To My Soul”, the enveloping minimalism of “How Do You Feel?” and the 11-minute, two-chord guitar drones propelling “Suicide”.

jason-will-pete-2

“The band was slowly starring to split up, and although it didn’t become common knowledge until later on, it was happening,” Kember told me in 1999. “It was a lot less collaborative than the two previous records. Half the band had just left – the bass player and drummer had left, or to be honest, the drummer had left and we’d kicked the bass player out. We went off to Cornwall with a new bass player [Carruthers] and initially no drummer to start recording the album. We had some weird deal in the studio where we had run of the place – it was this converted cottage in the middle of nowhere, which was very pleasant, very out of the way – but we kind of fell out with the guy who was looking after the place. The recording equipment was a bit primitive, so we ended up having to rerecord parts of it when we got back to Rugby.”

“We started recording in Cornwall,” Pierce told me in 2009. “It was quite a funky little house in the middle of nowhere. Kind of hippie, log burners… I’d never been anywhere like that. I’m from the town. Also, to be honest, I’d never really travelled, we never had money when we were kids. In Cornwall, we were sleeping on mattresses on the floor. But it only works if everyone gets on, and it was getting to the point with Pete where we couldn’t be in the same room together. He got crueller, and it was very hard to deal with, especially as we were in such a close scene. I’d started going out with Kate [Radley, future Spiritualized keyboardist], and Pete was so childish – ‘You can’t do that.’ It became miserable, but making this music was never about misery – there’s a beautiful sorrow, a beautiful longing about the music. Even in the more heavy-duty drones there was a kind of epiphany.”

Pierce subsequently finesse this notion of “beautiful longing” with his next band. “Lord Can You Hear Me?”, the closing track of Playing With Fire, is essentially a template for Spiritualized: gospel tropes, horns, religious imagery. Similarly, Kember continued to explore drones and longer, experimental pieces in Spectrum and E.A.R.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxgrxD674IY

“It’s hard for me to be objective about my own songs, but certainly Jason’s songs on Playing With Fire are among the best he’s done,” said Kember. “We tried to be different here, but there were inherent limitations in our approach. If you’re writing two-chord songs, you have to work a certain way. It can be very restrictive, but that forces you to try harder to come up with ways to make the songs different.”

Playing With Fire demonstrates the high standard of the work Kember and Pierce achieved – if not entirely collaboratively, then at least within close proximity of one another. Piece had some views on the way their songwriting processes during this period functioned.

“‘How Does It Feel?’ was originally called ‘Repeater’, which is the sound a Vox Starstreamer makes: you hit the guitar and that’s what comes out of it, it plays itself. Pete put down this long repeater thing and then I constructed a melody over the top, and his claim was that it was his song, because he’d put down the original track. I joked that if you owned the tape, you owned the first part, so you could make this claim that I own the silence that the Starstreamer is going on to. I mean, you can’t make songs with people who are putting flags in them – saying, that’s my bit, that was my melody. We wrote songs together – no, we wrote songs and then we shared the credit. It doesn’t matter whose song it was, or who did the greater or the lesser part of it, it was just that was what you did. Done.”

“On Playing With Fire, Jason’s songs were minimal – both the songwriting and the amount of sound on tape,” said Kember. “When he’s good, he’s fucking amazing; when he hits the mark, he really delivers. There’s songs on Playing With Fire like ‘Lord Can You Hear Me?’ which can make me cry.”

The band recorded one final album, Recurring, where the divisions between Kember and Pierce were more pronounced. “People always point to Recurring and the fact my songs and Jason’s songs are on two different sides,” noted Kember. The end of Spacemen 3 was, as Carruthers’ documents in his book, a fairly bloody business. It’s a shame; but the way these things go. There is, at least, a fine body of work spread out across the band’s four studio albums (and, with Performance and Dreamweapon, two excellent live albums).

Spacemen 3 represented a particularly British kind of psychedelia. I don’t mean a Lewis Carroll-style whimsy, but something firmly rooted in Kember and Pierce’s experiences in the Midlands during Thatcher’s Eighties; a dank, urban misery marked by a withdrawal into drugs and a proclivity for inner flight. Accordingly, the band’s mesmerising effects, loops and drones felt just as mind-altering as the exploratory sounds of an earlier generation. Playing With Fire captures the moment where Spacemen 3 were at the top of their game: tuned in and, despite their pharmacopoeia of drug references, remarkably switched on.

Follow me on Twitter @MichaelBonner

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Björk live at the Royal Albert Hall, London, September 21, 2016

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It can, admittedly, be quite hard work to sell Björk as a visceral rather than ethereal artist. Take the way she arrives onstage at the Royal Albert Hall, for her first full show in a year: a figure in avant-garde classical drapery, masked to resemble some fluorescent hybrid of cat and orchid. Adjectives of magic and otherness still inexorably cluster around her as they have done so often, and so tiresomely, over the past three decades.

But while her features may be obscured, this is a defiantly flesh and blood manifestation of Björk, re-engaging after a year of apps, masks and augmented reality obfuscations. Tonight’s show is constructed around 2015’s Vulnicura, a suite of songs so intimate that her retreat into safe virtual spaces seems understandable, and her return to performance a harrowing trial. The digital edges of the Vulnicura songs are absent here, with Björk’s exegesis of her ruined marriage exposed further by the extravagant simplicity of the settings: nothing but voice and string orchestra, whose size never mitigates against subtlety.

“Black Lake”, even more so than the original recorded version, is punctuated by long passages of minimalist catgut drone, slowly fading out of audibility before Björk starts singing again. There are no visual distractions, just an unforgiving focus on her words, her voice – still astounding – and her movements. These small expressive gestures and half-dance moves have a fallible, humane grace that comes from a gawkiness, at times verging on clumpiness, powerfully at odds with the radical couture decisions and spritelike clichés.

As with Nick Cave’s recent Skeleton Tree, it’s easy to be distracted by the emotional heft of the Vulnicura songs, and hard to separate their aesthetic potency from the context in which they were written. Sometimes the invocations have a desperate sort of urgency: “Love will keep us safe from death,” she promises in “Notget”, at the fraught climax of the concert’s first half. At others, the experience can feel voyeuristic as, amidst the blasted expanses of “Black Lake”, she sings, “Family was always our sacred mutual mission/Which you abandoned.” Hiding at least some of her emotions behind diaphanous masks then seems a necessary, if flimsy, defence.

Still, a short second set, including some earlier songs, points up how the likes of “Stonemilker” and “Lionsong” now rank among the very best work of a storied career. Prefaced by Vulnicura’s litanies of heartbreak, Björk’s old paeans to love and security accumulate a new and fragile poignancy. The ship’s horns of “Anchor Song” are replaced by gently ebbing strings as she relocates a place of safety, while “I’ve Seen It All” seems to balance precariously between the wonder of the original and an earned world-weariness.

The most daring reinvention comes in the encore, as the punishing techno of 1997’s “Pluto” is reconfigured into a matrix of orchestral stabs and wordless ululations. As with many attempts to make scores out of dance music, a certain menace comes to the fore, with the strings taking on a Bernard Herrman-esque timbre of encroaching horror, even as Björk’s raw energies seem to be channelled into something closer to joy and, after a fashion, abandon. Afterwards, the crowd keep singing the refrain like an Icelandic football chant, clapping and stamping out the rhythms so that the whole Albert Hall is transformed into a frantic Luddite rave, a demonstration so overwhelming that it forces Björk back out of her dressing room to offer further benedictions and thanks.

The evening’s highlight, though, comes a little earlier, when “Pagan Poetry” turns into a revelatory enactment of the bond between singer and audience. As she stomps at the edge of the stage, as disdainful of her autocues as she has been all night, she chants “I love him” a cappella over and over, then is visibly rattled by the crowd adding the record’s harmonies of “She loves him”. Here, perhaps, is how a performance of such intimate personal material can turn out to be consolatory rather than masochistic. An answer, perhaps, to the question posed earlier in “Lionsong”: “These abstract complex feelings/I just don’t know how to handle them.”

   First Set

  1. Stonemilker
  2. Lionsong
  3. History Of Touches
  4. Black Lake
  5. Family
  6. Notget

Second Set

  1. Aurora
  2. I’ve Seen It All
  3. Jóga
  4. Pagan Poetry
  5. Quicksand
  6. Mouth Mantra

Encore:

  1. The Anchor Song
  2. Pluto

Picture: Santiago Philipe

 

Watch Shirley Collins new video for “Death And The Lady”

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Shirley Collins has released a new video for “Death And The Lady“, which you can watch below.

The song is taken from Lodestar, her first album in 38 years.

You can read our exclusive interview with Shirley Collins in the new issue of Uncut, which is on sale now

“This is another centuries old song,” says Collins. “It reminds me of a wonderful scene in Ingmar Bergman’s ‘The Seventh Seal’ where, on a wild, lonely beach a knight plays a game of chess with Death – which of course he can’t win.”

The tracklisting for Lodestar is:

Awake Awake – The Split Ash Tree – May Carol – Southover
The Banks of Green Willow
Cruel Lincoln
Washed Ashore
Death And the Lady
Pretty Polly
Old Johnny Buckle
Sur le Borde de l’Eau
The Rich Irish Lady/Jeff Sturgeon
The Silver Swan

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Hear Leonard Cohen’s new song, “You Want It Darker”

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Leonard Cohen has released the title track from his forthcoming album, You Want it Darker, today – his 82nd birthday.

The album is due on October 21; it has been produced by Cohen’s son Adam.

You can hear the song below.

The song features the Montreal’s Cantor Gideon Zelermyer and the Shaar Hashomayim Synagogue Choir; part of the song appeared in an episode of the BBC series, Peaky Blinders.

Click here to read Leonard Cohen’s 20 greatest songs as chosen by friends, family and collaborators

The tracklisting for You Want It Darker is:

You Want It Darker
Treaty
On the Level
Leaving the Table
If I Didn’t Have Your Love
Travelling Light
Seemed the Better Way
Steer Your Way
String Reprise/Treaty

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Paul Weller to reissue first two solo albums on vinyl

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Paul Weller‘s first 2 solo albums are being remastered for a vinyl reissue by UMC on November 18.

Out of print for many years, the self titled debut and Wild Wood will be available on heavyweight vinyl and packaged in the original release gatefold sleeve artwork.

Paul Weller (originally released on Go! Discs in 1992) will feature an 8 page stapled colour booklet while Wild Wood includes a colour sticker and a poster.

Paul Weller includes the singles, “Above The Clouds”, “Uh Huh Oh Yeh” and “Into Tomorrow“. Wild Wood, meanwhile, features the title song, “Sunflower“, “Hung Up”, “The Weaver” and “Out Of The Sinking”.

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD