Home Blog Page 141

Watch Radiohead’s complete video for “Burn The Witch”

0

Radiohead have released a full length video for their new single, “Burn The Witch“.

The band have teased two clips from the video already today on their Instagram account.

The first post featured a bird tweeting and went live at 5am GMT to coincide with the dawn chorus.

Radiohead registered a new company called Dawn Chorus, LLP in January, hinting that a new album was about to drop.

A second post at 12.30pm GMT depicts a woman tied to a tree as some sort of ritual plays out before her.

The weekend’s digital scrub came as fans in the UK reported receiving mysterious leaflets in the mail from the band.

Text on the leaflets reads: “Sing a song of sixpence that goes / Burn the Witch / We know where you live”.

Burn The Witch” is the title of an unreleased song that first appeared in Stanley Donwood‘s art for 2003’s Hail To The Thief. In 2005, the song appeared on a chalkboard bearing the titles of potential tracks destined for the band’s 2007 album, In Rainbows.

“Burn The Witch” will be available on all digital services from 00:01 on May 4.

The June 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Blondie, plus George Martin, Brian Eno, Dexys, The Monkees, Graham Nash, Merle Haggard, Ronnie Spector, Tony Joe White, Frank Zappa, Eric Clapton, The Coral, Max Richter and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Bob Dylan, The Rolling Stones, Paul McCartney, Neil Young, Roger Waters and The Who announce details of Desert Trip festival

0

Bob Dylan, The Rolling Stones, Paul McCartney, Neil Young, Roger Waters and The Who will all perform at the Desert Trip festival in Indio, California on October 7, 8 and 9.

The festival has been the source of much speculation over the past few weeks, since The LA Times reported on April 15 that Goldenvoice Entertainment, the promoters behind Coachella Festival, were looking to hold the event in Indio, California – the same site as Coachella.

On April 20, Roger Daltrey appeared to confirm the festival was taking place, telling Canada’s Postmedia Network: “I think it’s us and Roger Waters on the same day. It’s a fantastic idea for a festival. It’s the greatest remains of our era.”

“I hope a lot of normal fans can get tickets before they get snatched up,” he added.

Meanwhile, over the weekend, The Rolling Stones, Paul McCartney and Bob Dylan post teaser videos ending with the word “October” on their Facebook pages.

The event has now been officially launched under the Desert Trip banner.

Performances start after sunset and each artist will play a full set.

The line up for Desert Trip festival is:

October 7: THE ROLLING STONES · BOB DYLAN
October 8: PAUL McCARTNEY · NEIL YOUNG + PROMISE OF THE REAL
October 9: ROGER WATERS · THE WHO

Pre-sale begins on Monday, May 9 at 10AM Pacific Time.

Ticket prices are as follows:
3 day passes
General admission – $399
Reserved floor – $699, $999, $1,599
Reserved grandstand – $999, $1599
General admission pit – $1,599

Single day passes
General admission – $199

More information is available from the Desert Trip festival website.

The June 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Blondie, plus George Martin, Brian Eno, Dexys, The Monkees, Graham Nash, Merle Haggard, Ronnie Spector, Tony Joe White, Frank Zappa, Eric Clapton, The Coral, Max Richter and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Reviewed!: some under-the-radar spring highlights

0

A bit hard to concentrate on other music this morning, as the phoney war leading up to whenever Radiohead decide to release something continues apace. It occurred to me, though, that I should probably post a few reviews of recent favourites here, prompted in part by the fact that The Dead Tongues start their UK tour with Phil Cook in London tonight.

For a few of us, the fertile North Carolina scene centred on Hiss Golden Messenger’s MC Taylor and Cook has been a revelation this decade, and Asheville’s Ryan Gustafson is very much a part of that expanding fraternal network. Gustafson currently plays guitar in Cook’s soulful live band, but his second album as The Dead Tongues mostly takes a folksier path, with hearty fiddle tunes, and plenty of elevated fingerpicking on banjo and acoustic. “Montana” is more than a showcase for a virtuoso musician, though. It reveals Gustafson as a fine artisanal singer-songwriter, often Dylanish in tone, and with at least one song – the twanging, swaggering, Mellotron-dusted “Graveyard Fields” – strong enough to have sat on HGM’s classic, Lateness Of Dancers.

https://soundcloud.com/winsome-management/graveyard-fields-by-the-dead-tongues

The very fine Kevin Morby is also in town this week, and while he makes rapid strides in his solo career, the progress of his former band, Woods, is gentler, more incremental. “City Sun Eater In The River Of Light” is the ninth album by Jeremy Earl’s shifting cabal, and one which compounds the advances of “Bend Beyond” (2012) and “With Light And With Love” (2014). Where once there was lo-fi whimsy, a certain crispness is now prevalent, along with expanded horizons and budgets that can accommodate the occasional horn section, or the tentative funk of “Can’t See At All”. Earl’s songcraft, meanwhile, continues to be refined: if only his voice were as strong as the guitar soloing which so gleefully knocks the likes of “Sun City Creeps” and “I See In The Dark” off their axes.

In all the clamour surrounding his hook-up with Josh Homme (Post Pop Depression), a second new Iggy Pop project has rather slipped under the radar. “Leaves Of Grass”, on Morr Music, finds him reading a clutch of Walt Whitman poems, while a coalition of German electronicists formed from Tarwater and Alva Noto provide discreetly glitchy soundscapes. Thanks in no small part to Iggy’s voice, a tool now of great visceral gravitas, it works brilliantly. In his notes, he compares Whitman to Elvis, and suggests the poet would’ve made “the perfect gangster rapper”. Pop himself, though, is a better embodiment of Whitman’s muscular sensualism: “Lusty, phallic, with the potent original loins… bathing my songs in sex”; “Singing the phallus, singing the song of procreation.”

A couple from the boutique UK label, MIE Music. Ben Chasny’s work as Six Organs Of Admittance has recently taken a forbidding theoretical turn, based on his new “Hexadic” compositional system. As yet, however, the radical practice doesn’t seem to have infected his collaborations; either in the mighty, jamming Rangda, or on this somewhat shadowy project. Coypu finds Chasny in the company of a mostly Italian crowd, with deep underground CVs (Larsen? Blind Cave Salamander?), and a faintly gothic arsenal of effects to back up Chasny’s ever-thoughtful guitar lines. At times, the monkish clank and drone of “Floating” recalls outliers like Nurse With Wound. Highlights, though, are transcendent more than transgressive, notably “March Of The River Rats”, a rippling invocation of Popol Vuh – and, indeed, the more accessible Six Organs of old.

Much like the Coypu album, Portland’s Dreamboat serenely pits a folkish singer/guitarist – in this case Ilyas Ahmed – against kosmische-inclined new collaborators; here, the Thrill Jockey duo, Golden Retriever. Ahmed cuts an appealingly desolate figure on “Dreamboat”‘s two long pieces, given plenty of space in Matt Carlson and Jonathan Sielaff’s humid synthscapes. The tools are slightly different, not least Sielaff’s processed clarinet looming out of the murk at intervals, but the prevailing atmosphere often resembles that found on late ‘90s records by Flying Saucer Attack: a gentle music in which melancholy is given apparently boundless time and space to try and work itself out.

Not be confused with the “Love And Pride” hitmakers, LA trio King instead conjure up a seductive alternative ‘80s on debut “We Are King”, as if an R&B production machine like Jam & Lewis had become infatuated with the downy textures of the Cocteau Twins. The aquarian soul of Erykah Badu is another antecedent for this meticulous debut, written, produced and performed by Paris Strother, along with twin sister Amber and Anita Bias. “We Are King” is too laidback and classy to be anywhere near as triumphalist as its name implies, and the 12 lovely songs have such a languid unity of purpose, it can be hard to tell where one stops and the next starts. Still, try “Red Eye”, with its melodic richness redolent of peak ‘70s Stevie Wonder.

Finally, a remarkable comp on Third Man: “Why The Mountains Are Black: Primeval Greek Village Music 1907-1960”. “No ancient Western culture valued music more highly than the ancient Greeks,” writes Christopher King in the sleevenotes to this 2CD set of revelations, taking a longer view of cultural history than most CD compilers. The music harvested by King from precious 78s provides a connection between this formative civilization and 20th Century America, as the Greek diaspora bring their traditions to the States. The duelling bagpipe music played here by Zembellas and Mailles on two tracks, for instance, originates on two small islands in the Aegean. By the time of the recordings in 1950, however, this Tsabouna music had migrated to Tarpon Springs, Florida, where many of its practitioners had relocated to ply their trades as free-diving sponge fishermen. King, also a noted collector of old blues records, makes big claims for the social necessity of this music: “It was an essential tool for survival,” he claims, “as natural and as necessary as any object crafted for hunting.” Critically, though, it’s also wildly entertaining in a way which transcends historical context: check “Enas Aetos-Tsamiko”, a nimble and uproarious 1926 jam, recorded in 1926, that King identifies as kin to the hot jazz of the time.

Status Quo launch their own ale and cider

0

Status Quo have launched their own alcoholic beverages.

The ‘Dog Of Two Head’ ale and the ‘Down Down’ cider will be available bottled in the UK through the Spar chain from May 18.

‘Dog Of Two Head’ will be available to buy on draught at selected outlets from June.

‘Down Down’ has been selected for Wetherspoon’s National Cider Festival which runs from Friday July 8.

‘Dog Of Two Head’ ale was created in conjunction with Hobsons Brewery in Shropshire, ‘Down Down’ cider is crafted by the Celtic Marches company in Herefordshire.

Francis Rossi said, “We know what we like. And we know what our fans like. And I think we can all agree that we like these!”

Rick Parfitt added, “It’s no secret that over the years the band has enjoyed a drink or three. Finally, we’re actually seeing a return on those wasted hours by creating something useful. We love it!”

Both ‘Dog Of Two Head’ and ‘Down Down’ will be available online. The beer can be purchased from www.hobsons-brewery.co.uk/statusquobeer. The cider can be ordered online from: www.celticmarches.com/detail/status-quo-down-down-4-6-herefordshire-cider.

The Quo’s drinks follow on from Iron Maiden‘s Trooper ale, Queen‘s Bohemian lager and the Pogues’ Irish whiskey.

The June 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Blondie, plus George Martin, Brian Eno, Dexys, The Monkees, Graham Nash, Merle Haggard, Ronnie Spector, Tony Joe White, Frank Zappa, Eric Clapton, The Coral, Max Richter and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

The Who announce ‘Back To The Who’ tour

0

The Who will perform five special shows in Glasgow, Manchester, Sheffield, Birmingham and Liverpool later this Summer as part of ‘Back To The Who Tour’ 2016.

The dates – which will be the band’s first series of UK shows since headlining Glastonbury in 2015.

The Who will play

August 29: The SSE Hydro, Glasgow
August 31: Manchester Arena
September 3: Sheffield Arena
September 5: Genting Arena, Birmingham
September 7: Echo Arena, Liverpool

Tickets for the shows go on sale at 9am GMT om Friday May 6 from AXS.COM.

Meanwhile, Roger Daltrey appears to have confirmed reports that a mega festival is being arranged featuring Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Paul McCartney, the Rolling Stones, The Who and Roger Waters.

The LA Times reported that Goldenvoice Entertainment, the promoters behind Coachella Festival, were looking to hold the event in Indio, California – the same site as Coachella – this year between October 7 and 9.

Daltrey has now appeared to confirm the reports, telling Canada’s Postmedia Network: “I think it’s us and Roger Waters on the same day. It’s a fantastic idea for a festival. It’s the greatest remains of our era.”

“I hope a lot of normal fans can get tickets before they get snatched up,” he added.

The June 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Blondie, plus George Martin, Brian Eno, Dexys, The Monkees, Graham Nash, Merle Haggard, Ronnie Spector, Tony Joe White, Frank Zappa, Eric Clapton, The Coral, Max Richter and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Hear new Bob Dylan song, “All The Way”

0

Bob Dylan has released a new song, “All The Way“.

It is the second track taken from his forthcoming album, Fallen Angels following “Melancholy Mood” last month.

The music was written by Jimmy Van Heusen with lyrics by Sammy Cahn. It was originally recorded by Frank Sinatra and released in 1957.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MmFaNuT-20g

The tracklisting for Fallen Angels is:

Young At Heart
Maybe You’ll Be There
Polka Dots And Moonbeams
All The Way
Skylark
Nevertheless
All Or Nothing At All
On A Little Street In Singapore
It Had To Be You
Melancholy Mood
That Old Black Magic
Come Rain Or Come Shine

The album will be released on May 20 by Columbia Records.

The June 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Blondie, plus George Martin, Brian Eno, Dexys, The Monkees, Graham Nash, Merle Haggard, Ronnie Spector, Tony Joe White, Frank Zappa, Eric Clapton, The Coral, Max Richter and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Radiohead share new album teasers

0

Radiohead have posted two stop-motion teaser videos on their Instagram account.

The posts arrive after the band deleted everything from their social media accounts and website over the weekend.

The first post featured a bird tweeting and went live at 5am GMT to coincide with the dawn chorus.

Radiohead registered a new company called Dawn Chorus, LLP in January, hinting that a new album was about to drop.

A second post at 12.30pm GMT depicts a woman tied to a tree as some sort of ritual plays out before her.

The weekend’s digital scrub came as fans in the UK reported receiving mysterious leaflets in the mail from the band.

Text on the leaflets reads: “Sing a song of sixpence that goes / Burn the Witch / We know where you live”.

Burn The Witch” is the title of an unreleased song that first appeared in Stanley Donwood‘s art for 2003’s Hail To The Thief. In 2005, the song appeared on a chalkboard bearing the titles of potential tracks destined for the band’s 2007 album, In Rainbows.

The June 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Blondie, plus George Martin, Brian Eno, Dexys, The Monkees, Graham Nash, Merle Haggard, Ronnie Spector, Tony Joe White, Frank Zappa, Eric Clapton, The Coral, Max Richter and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Ask Laurie Anderson!

0

To coincide with her latest album and film Heart Of A Dog, Laurie Anderson will be answering your questions as part of our regular An Audience With… feature.

So is there anything you’d like us to ask the legendary artist?

What’s her favourite breed of dog?
What does she remember about collaborating with Brian Eno?
What does she think of ‘O Superman’ today?

Send up your questions by noon, Thursday, May 5 to uncutaudiencewith@timeinc.com.

The best questions, and Laurie’s answers, will be published in a future edition of Uncut magazine.

The June 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Blondie, plus George Martin, Brian Eno, Dexys, The Monkees, Graham Nash, Merle Haggard, Ronnie Spector, Tony Joe White, Frank Zappa, Eric Clapton, The Coral, Max Richter and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Willie Nelson: “I smoked dope on the White House roof once”

Onboard his battlebus, Uncut is granted a conference with the laidback potentate of country music, WILLIE NELSON. On the agenda: Patsy Cline, Johnny Cash, a sanctified guitar, an army of Willie Nelson clones, and the simple business of being America’s best-loved outlaw. Originally published in Uncut’s July 2010 issue (Take 158). Words: Andrew Mueller

__________________________________

Even amid the gaudy bustle of midtown Manhattan, Willie Nelson’s bus is hard to miss. It’s a bronze leviathan airbrushed with lurid western scenes, parked on West 53rd Street alongside the Ed Sullivan Theater, where Nelson is due to make an appearance on David Letterman’s show later this evening. Nelson, wearing a purplish plaid shirt draped over black T-shirt and jeans, emerges from a room at the back of the bus, and parks himself on the seat at the table opposite the kitchenette. Many are the musicians who complain about life on the road. Nelson, who has lived it longer than most, is not among them (indeed, one of his best-known songs – “On The Road Again” – is a celebration of the touring musician’s lot).

“This bus has done about a million miles in the last five years,” he says, and he does not appear to be exaggerating for comic effect. “It’s just much more fun doing it by bus than any other way – and I’ve done it every other way. Flying is too big a hassle. And this is more like home. I’ve got everything I need here – a bed, a shower, a stove. I very seldom go into the hotel. The rest of the band check in, and I stay here.”

A noticeboard behind him is pinned with photos and assorted touring ephemera. On the table before Nelson are components of a contraption that look suspiciously like they’ve recently been used to smoke dope (Nelson’s enthusiasm for dope is sufficiently legendary to have inspired other country singers: Toby Keith wrote a song called “Weed With Willie” in 2003). Nelson has long been an ardent campaigner for reform of marijuana laws, and cannot be accused of not knowing his subject. He has been busted many times, and several of his band and crew were charged with possession of marijuana and moonshine in North Carolina as recently as January (although Nelson says of himself that “They [the police] mostly leave me alone, now.”) In April, Nelson admitted to Larry King during an interview on CNN that he was stoned (something that King should probably have spotted when Nelson started mumbling about 9/11 conspiracies).

Nelson is, unsurprisingly, an altogether mellow and affable conversationalist. A few days earlier, I’d seen him play in Binghamton, in upstate New York. He laughs delightedly when I mention the proportion of men in the crowd who looked like him – apparently, they’re a regular feature of his shows (“Aw, they’re great,” says Nelson, “did you see some good ones?”). So, it seems, is the pre-show veneration of Nelson’s battered guitar, Trigger. The decrepit acoustic has logged uncountable miles with Nelson, and by the look of it has been dragged behind the tour bus for most of them. When delivered to the stage in anticipation of Nelson’s arrival, it prompted a surge of camera-brandishing worshippers. Are there any special measures taken for the guitar’s safe transport?

“I just keep it with me all the time,” he shrugs. “We had to get a new case, because the old case wore out, but I just keep it back there. I sleep with it.”

Is it insured for some fantastic sum?

“No.”

What’s special about it?

“Well,” he considers. “I’m a big Django Reinhardt fan, and this guitar has a similar sound to Django’s guitar. I think that’s the most important thing. I’ve had other guitars, but that’s the sound I really like.”

It sounded fine in Binghamton, NY, anyway. Nelson himself had appeared in increments. His opening act was his son, Lukas – one of nine children from four marriages (the first three of which were, at the very least, eventful – his first wife beat him with a broom handle, and his second threatened him with a gun when she found out about the woman who would become his third).

Though there were few surprises in Nelson Sr’s setlist, he’d ambled amiably through “Whiskey River”, “Georgia On My Mind”, and “Mama, Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up To Be Cowboys”, giving every impression that, at the very least, he didn’t object to being up there. People threw gifts onto the stage, mostly baseball caps: he picked them up, squinted at the logos to make sure they didn’t endorse anything he wouldn’t want to be photographed in, wore them briefly, and tossed them back. He solicited applause for the band, especially his sister, Bobbie, on piano, and for his temporary drummer Billy English, stepping in for his brother and Nelson’s old friend Paul English, who had recently suffered a stroke. Inevitably, Nelson dedicates “Me & Paul” to him. A Nelson staple since 1971 album Yesterday’s Wine, it recalls what was, at that point, merely a decade and half’s dissolute friendship. The stories of misadventure the song recalls – about being almost busted in Laredo, refused boarding of an aircraft in Milwaukee, overdoing the hospitality in Buffalo and neglecting to play the show – are all, both Nelson and English have repeatedly insisted, true.

Hear Paul Simon’s new single, “Cool Papa Bell”

0

Paul Simon has released a new track from his forthcoming album, Stranger To Stranger.

Cool Papa Bell” follows on from “Wristband“, which Simon released in April.

Stranger To Stranger is Simon’s first solo album since 2011’s So Beautiful Or So What. The album, which is released by Virgin EMI on June 3, was produced by Simon himself along with Roy Halee.

The Stranger to Stranger tracklisting is:

The Werewolf
Wristband
The Clock
Street Angel
Stranger to Stranger
In a Parade
Proof of Love
In the Garden of Edie
The Riverbank
Cool Papa Bell
Insomniac’s Lullaby

The June 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Blondie, plus George Martin, Brian Eno, Dexys, The Monkees, Graham Nash, Merle Haggard, Ronnie Spector, Tony Joe White, Frank Zappa, Eric Clapton, The Coral, Max Richter and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

The 13th Uncut Playlist Of 2016

0

I was reading a piece in The New Yorker the other day about Paul McCartney, which bugged for me for a bunch of reasons that are mostly too tedious to go into here, but involve crude and frequently absurd generalisations as well as, surprisingly for that magazine, factual glitches (who knew I could be so assiduous in my policing of Wings content?).

One specific line that particularly jumped out for the wrong reasons, though, was when the writer, Adam Gopnik, asserted:”It’s true that the sound of the band [Wings] was very un-Beatles-like—pop where they had been rock, slack where they had been tight.” Forgive me if I’m misreading this, but is Gopnik saying that The Beatles weren’t a pop band? It’s always seemed to me that the Beatles actually straddled pop and rock, that their story could be variously understood as one that embraced both loose definitions; that pop evolved into rock under their stewardship, even as they persisted in subverting any such prescriptive attempts at classification. This, I thought, was one of the things which made them culturally significant.

That blurring of pop and rock boundaries, and a concomitant ability to unite two tribes who, for at least a good chunk of modern musical history, were morbidly suspicious of one another’s iconography, is a rare skill. It occurs to me this morning that one of the reasons that the deaths of David Bowie and Prince have resonated so profoundly across such wide swathes of the population is for just this reason: both of them had the same gift of the Beatles to make music which felt simultaneously profound and ephemeral, equally at home on canonical albums and commercial radio. In their presence, all those anxious debates about rockism and popism become exploded and confused and, perhaps, irrelevant: this is transcendent music with what seems at times boundless appeal.

Not sure, though, how much more of that I’ve been playing this week, though as you can see the office playlist has been dominated by Van Morrison, as I dug into the catalogue to soundtrack the proorfreading of our next Ultimate Music Guide. That’ll be with you soon. In the meantime, I hope there’s something here of interest…

Follow me on Twitter @JohnRMulvey

1 My Morning Jacket – It Still Moves: Deluxe Reissue (ATO Records)

2 Brigid Mae Power – Brigid Mae Power (Tompkins Square)

3 William Tyler – Modern Country (Merge)

4 Kyle Craft – Dolls Of Highland (Sub Pop)

5 Peter Baumann – Machines Of Desire (Bureau B)

6 Dave Heumann – Cloud Hands (2020)

7 Beyond The Wizards Sleeve – The Soft Bounce (Phantasy)

8 Van Morrison – Tupelo Honey (Polydor)

9 Van Morrison – St Dominic’s Preview (Polydor)

10 Raime – Tooth (Blackest Ever Black)

11 D’Angelo Ft. Princess – Sometimes It Snows In April (The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6uzBHhPEWpE

12 Adia Victoria – Beyond The Bloodhounds (Canvasback)

13 Psychic Ills – Inner Journey Out (Sacred Bones)

14 Van Morrison – Caledonia Soul Music (Bootleg)

15 Van Morrison – His Band And The Street Choir (Warner Bros)

16 Brian Case – Tense Nature (Hands In The Dark)

17 Terry Reid – The Other Side Of The River (Future Days/Light In The Attic)

18 Marisa Anderson – Into The Light (Chaos Kitchen)

19 Christian Fennesz & Jim O’Rourke – It’s Hard For Me To Say I’m Sorry (Editions Mego)

20 Drive Like Jehu – Bullet Train To Vegas/Hand Over Fist (Merge)

21Laraaji & Sun Araw – Professional Sunflow (W.25th/Superior Viaduct)

Hear The Monkees’ new single, “She Makes Me Laugh”

0

The Monkees have released the first track from their new album, Good Times!

She Makes Me Laugh” is written by Weezer’s Rivers Cuomo.

Good Times! is the band’s first new studio album for 20 years and features Micky Dolenz, Michael Nesmith and Peter Tork as well as Davy Jones in an archive vocal.

Good Times! also features songs written for the band by Harry Nilsson, Andy Partridge, Ben Gibbard, Neil Diamond and Paul Weller and Noel Gallagher.

You can read our exclusive interview with Dolenz, Nesmith and Tork in the new issue on Uncut, in UK shops now and available to buy digitally

The June 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Blondie, plus George Martin, Brian Eno, Dexys, The Monkees, Graham Nash, Merle Haggard, Ronnie Spector, Tony Joe White, Frank Zappa, Eric Clapton, The Coral, Max Richter and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Neil Young reveals details of new album, EARTH

0

Neil Young has revealed details of his new album, EARTH.

The album will be released on June 17 by Reprise Records and features performances of songs from a range of Young’s albums, including last year’s The Monsanto Years, 1990’s Ragged Glory, and 1970’s After The Gold Rush.

The audio was captured during Young’s 2015 tour with The Promise Of The Real.

The album features the live recordings, along with added musical overdubs, as well as sounds of the earth, such as city sounds like car horns, sounds of insects, and animal sounds from bears, birds, crickets, bees, horses and cows.

“Ninety-eight uninterrupted minutes long, EARTH flows as a collection of 13 songs from throughout my life, songs I have written about living here on our planet together,” says Young. “Our animal kingdom is well represented in the audience as well, and the animals, insects, birds, and mammals actually take over the performances of the songs at times.”

neil_promise

The track-listing for EARTH is as follows:

“People Want To Hear About Love” (from The Monsanto Years)
“Big Box” (from The Monsanto Years)
“Mother Earth” (from Ragged Glory)
“The Monsanto Years” (from The Monsanto Years)
“I Won’t Quit” (previously unreleased)
“Western Hero” (from Sleeps With Angels)
“Vampire Blues” (from On The Beach)
“Hippie Dream” (from Landing On Water)
“After The Gold Rush” (from After The Gold Rush)
“Wolf Moon” (from The Monsanto Years)
“Love & Only Love” (from Ragged Glory)

Young will preview the album in public on May 6 in Los Angeles at The Natural History Museum as part of its First Fridays series.

During “An Evening With Neil Young”, he will present the first public playback of EARTH in its entirety in Pono high definition fidelity audio. Young will deliver the opening portion of the program with his insights and explanation of the making of EARTH, and its contents.

Meanwhile, Young will release two archival films on June 10 – Human Highway and Rust Never Sleeps.

The June 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Blondie, plus George Martin, Brian Eno, Dexys, The Monkees, Graham Nash, Merle Haggard, Ronnie Spector, Tony Joe White, Frank Zappa, Eric Clapton, The Coral, Max Richter and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Grateful Dead exclusive! Hear “Ramble On Rose” from Red Rocks 1978

0

The Grateful Dead are gearing up to release their next batch of archival goodies.

This time, they’re celebrating the official debut of the Dead’s first-ever performances at the legendary Red Rocks Amphitheatre in Colorado from July, 1978.

We’re delighted to have a world exclusive of “Ramble On Rose” from the band’s July 8 show.

The track is taken from a forthcoming three-CD set of the complete July 8 show which is available on May 13.

The band will also release a mammoth, limited edition 12-disc featuring five unreleased shows from July, 1978, called July 1978: The Complete Recordings.

The shows are:
Arrowhead Stadium, Kansas City, MO (July 1, 78)
St. Paul Civic Center, St. Paul, MN (July 3, 78)
Omaha Civic Auditorium, Omaha, NE (July 5, 78)
Red Rocks Amphitheatre, Morrison CO (July 7 and 8, 78)

“As an archivist and Dead Head, this boxed set is about as exciting as it gets,” says Grateful Dead archivist and boxed set producer David Lemieux. “Musically, it features five exhilarating, dynamic nights in the summer of 1978. The sound quality is impeccable, as would be expected from Betty Cantor-Jackson’s always-pristine recordings. The rarity of the first three nights, and the hall-of-fame pedigree of the last two, makes this one of the most astonishing Grateful Dead releases ever. Collaborating with the owners of these tapes, we are very pleased to see these important historical documents returned home and now shared with the world.”

The June 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Blondie, plus George Martin, Brian Eno, Dexys, The Monkees, Graham Nash, Merle Haggard, Ronnie Spector, Tony Joe White, Frank Zappa, Eric Clapton, The Coral, Max Richter and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Ben Watt – Fever Dream

0

The relationship between pop music, initially seen as a fleeting youth movement, and age, its sworn enemy, has come far. Neil Young’s famous battle cry seems long forgotten, not least by Young himself, while the reaction to David Bowie’s recent death suggests we now expect our musical deities to be indestructible, not incendiary.

As a 53-year-old, Ben Watt’s not only old enough to have attended his own fair share of funerals, but has also looked death head on. His 1996 book, Patient, related his struggle with the rare, life-threatening disease, Churg-Strauss Syndrome, and Fever Dream – the follow-up to 2014’s acclaimed Hendra – confronts related themes with similar courage. Suffused in both the dread mortality inspires and the peace that comes with accepting its inevitability, it simultaneously addresses the effects that the passing of years has on one’s relationships and the compromises these demand.

Not that it’s written exclusively as a first-person memoir. When Watt sings of how “there’s still so much I want to do” on “Winter’s Eve” – a song whose four minutes fly by much like life itself – he’s in character, telling the story of a man who’s “so full of rage, still so aggrieved/Stuck at the door of winter’s eve”. His tone, however, is equal parts desperate and galvanised, informed by the universally unforgiving nature – and implications – of our ephemerality. “Women’s Company”, meanwhile, tells of a businessman who laments an irrevocable decision to let go the institution that once defined him: “An offer came to buy him out/Recklessly he shelved his doubt/And sold up to regret it bitterly.” The resignation in his ensuing silence – “Can’t think what I missed the most,” Watt notes poignantly, “Sentimental stuff most probably” – is heartbreakingly understated.

Watt’s empathy is matched by observations on time’s distortion of the nature of love, something that, as he sings on “Between Two Fires”, “can last a lifetime/Other times it tires”. Displaying a touching sense of intimacy, “Never Goes Away” recalls fondly how he once “felt your heart beat through your dress/Showing up your tenderness”, but on “Gradually” he asks, “After all this time/Are we not who we used to be?” Likewise, on “Faces Of My Friends” he exhibits a blunt candour typical of the album – “A twelve-hour drunken heart-to-heart/Is as good a place as anywhere to start” – before quietly indulging his nostalgia on “Running With The Frontrunners”, a rumination on East London’s gentrification, though “Bricks And Wood”, in contrast, finds him returning to the derelict site of his childhood home, forced by its desolation – even “the beech tree at the front was gone” – to concede “It’s better to move on/Because the past is gone”.

Appropriately, Watt leans throughout on the mature jazz-folk that once inspired him to record North Marine Drive, his 1983 debut. The comparisons this earned with Tim Buckley (whose “Buzzin’ Fly” also provided the name for Watt’s house music label) remain valid, and there are hints here too, in the nimble bossa nova of “Faces Of My Friends” and the acoustic slip and slide of “Running With The Front Runners”, of prime John Martyn and David Crosby.

Watt’s colleagues further underline such sophistication. Bernard Butler’s discreet guitar licks, especially on “Between Two Fires”, are as seductively lazy and warmly distorted as those of Neil Young’s On The Beach, while double bassist Rex Horan (Neil Cowley Trio) and drummer Martin Ditcham provide a pleasantly unhurried rhythm section. The spacious live sound curated by engineer Bruno Ellingham helps recall Ditcham’s work on Talk Talk’s Spirit Of Eden, although Paul Weller’s Wild Wood – which, like Fever Dream, is fuelled by pastoral meditations and a penchant for Traffic – offers another touchstone.

Amid all of this, Watt’s voice, furthered by the richness that maturity has brought, beds in beautifully. That he’s as comfortable presenting homilies like “Everyone has limits from the start/Finding what they are is the tricky part” (“Between Two Fires”) as singing of “a liminal collusion” (“Running With The Frontrunners”) speaks of both his articulacy and his relaxed, confident delivery.

He concludes with “New Year Of Grace”, a metal resonator guitar providing a final, brittle sense of frailty as Marissa Nadler’s hushed backing vocals usher us towards a certain end. “I see myself, I see a lived-in face/If one that’s in search of grace”, Watts sings, and this elegant mixture of acceptance, defiance, resignation, and the wisdom gained from each, brings the album to a soothing, sanguine close. Age may indeed wither us, Watt seems to be testifying, but it needn’t provoke us to burn out or fade away.

Q&A
Ben Watt
You’re best known as one half of Everything But The Girl and as a DJ. Do you see this solo work as a radical departure?

I began as a singer-songwriter-guitarist in 1980. My first single was produced by Kevin Coyne. On my second release, an EP, I invited Robert Wyatt to collaborate. I was only 19. My debut album then went to No 1 on the UK Indie Album Charts. Yes, I then took a 30-year diversion which muddies the waters, but I feel happier now with this music than at any time for ages. DJing provided me with some of the best nights of my life, but it feels like now I am tapping back into some kind of nucleus of myself.

Does it concern you that people might think some of these songs are specifically about you and Tracey (Thorn)?
Not at all. Some are. We have been together a long time. I try and talk about what that means: how love is complicated; how it requires compromises; how you disagree; how things take a while to blow over; how we are often trapped inside ourselves; how that doesn’t stop you loving someone; how hope is resilient.

Should people wait for Everything But The Girl to record again?
No. Just try and enjoy what we’re both doing now. Tracey’s become a brilliant writer and columnist, and I hope I’m making good records. Neither of us are nostalgists. I hate that Greatest Hits circus. Trying to say new things is better.
INTERVIEW: WYNDHAM WALLACE

The June 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Blondie, plus George Martin, Brian Eno, Dexys, The Monkees, Graham Nash, Merle Haggard, Ronnie Spector, Tony Joe White, Frank Zappa, Eric Clapton, The Coral, Max Richter and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Watch David Gilmour’s tribute to Prince

0

David Gilmour has paid tribute to Prince, who died last week.

During his Teenage Cancer Trust on April 24 at the Royal Albert Hall, Gilmour performed “Comfortably Numb“, with the inclusion of “Purple Rain“.

This is not the first time Gilmour has covered “Purple Rain”. He teamed with Tom Jones for a performance of the song in 1992.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-yduZT5I8Q

Gilmour’s friend and occasional collaborator Kate Bush also paid tribute to Prince earlier this week.

Writing on her website, Bush claimed, “We’ve lost someone truly magical”.

Bush collaborated with Prince several times during the 1990s, with Prince appearing on “Why Should I Love You” from Bush’s 1993 album The Red Shoes. Meanwhile, she contributed to Prince’s 1996 album Emancipation.

Bush wrote, “I am so sad and shocked to hear the tragic news about Prince. He was the most incredibly talented artist. A man in complete control of his work from writer and musician to producer and director. He was such an inspiration. Playful and mind-blowingly gifted. He was the most inventive and extraordinary live act I’ve seen. The world has lost someone truly magical. Goodnight dear Prince.”

Yesterday, Morrissey posted his own tribute to Prince in a post on quasi-official website, True To You, where he praised Prince but was quick to criticise the press for not making more of his veganism.

“Although a long-serving vegan and a strong advocate of the abolition of the abattoir, neither of these points was mentioned in the one hundred television reports that I witnessed yesterday as they covered the enchanted life and sad death of Prince,” he wrote. “The points were not mentioned because they are identified as expressions against e$tabli$hment interests, therefore we, mere galley slaves, aren’t allowed to know.”

The June 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Blondie, plus George Martin, Brian Eno, Dexys, The Monkees, Graham Nash, Merle Haggard, Ronnie Spector, Tony Joe White, Frank Zappa, Eric Clapton, The Coral, Max Richter and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Ray Davies in conversation with Luke Skywalker!

0

Ray Davies will be joined by life-long Kinks fan Mark Hamill at an event to coincide with the release of The Kinks’ albums, Everybody’s In Showbiz and Muswell Hillbillies.

Billed as ‘an evening of conversation’, the event takes place on June 26 at Hornsey Town Hall.

Davies will also perform some select songs from the two albums alongside his long-time guitarist Bill Shanley, followed by a Q&A with the audience.

Hamill – best known as Luke Skywalker in the Star Wars films – will also read excerpts from Davies’s memoir Americana.

Hamill recently interviewed Davies for Big Issue magazine.

Everybody’s In Showbiz and Muswell Hillbillies will be reissued as a deluxe edition on June 3rd via Sony Legacy.

You can find out more about the event by clicking here.

The June 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Blondie, plus George Martin, Brian Eno, Dexys, The Monkees, Graham Nash, Merle Haggard, Ronnie Spector, Tony Joe White, Frank Zappa, Eric Clapton, The Coral, Max Richter and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Graham Nash: “There won’t be any more Crosby, Stills & Nash… there’s no magic there”

0

Graham Nash discusses his work with The Hollies, David Crosby, Stephen Stills and Neil Young, and solo, in the new issue of Uncut, dated June 2016 and out now.

“There won’t be any more CSNY,” Nash says, “and there won’t be any CSN, either. There’s no magic there any more. Well, we had a good run, a good 35, 40 years.”

Elsewhere in the interview, the singer and songwriter recalls his reasons for leaving The Hollies to move to California in the late ’60s.

“It wasn’t that I wanted to move on from The Hollies,” he says, “it was that I’d heard me and David [Crosby] and Stephen [Stills] sing. Once I’d heard that sound, you know, I wanted it.

“When that first happened, in Joni Mitchell’s living room, when we sang ‘You Don’t have To Cry’, I knew instantly that I would have to go back to England and leave The Hollies and leave my money and equipment, and my family and my friends, and follow that sound – which is, of course, what I did. People thought I was fucking crazy, frankly. But I’d heard that sound and I wanted it.”

Graham Nash’s new album, This Path Tonight, is out now.

Photo: Amy Grantham

The June 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Blondie, plus George Martin, Brian Eno, Dexys, The Monkees, Graham Nash, Merle Haggard, Ronnie Spector, Tony Joe White, Frank Zappa, Eric Clapton, The Coral, Max Richter and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Watch Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy, Sharon Van Etten, Jim James and more cover The Grateful Dead

0

The all-star Grateful Dead tribute album, Day Of The Dead is released on May 20 by 4AD.

Today, five of the album’s 59 tracks have been made available to coincide with the album’s pre-order details.

Jim James & Friends – ‘Candyman’
Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy & Friends – ‘Rubin & Cherise’
Perfume Genius, Sharon Van Etten & Friends – ‘To Lay Me Down’
Charles Bradley & Menahan Street Band – ‘Cumberland Blues’
Unknown Mortal Orchestra – ‘Shakedown Street’

These follow on from previously released tracks by Phosphorescent, Jenny Lewis & Friends, The War On Drugs, The National, Courtney Barnett and Bruce Hornsby and DeYarmond Edison.

Jim James & Friends – ‘Candyman’

Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy & Friends – ‘Rubin & Cherise’

Perfume Genius, Sharon Van Etten & Friends – ‘To Lay Me Down’

Charles Bradley & Menahan Street Band – ‘Cumberland Blues’


Unknown Mortal Orchestra
– ‘Shakedown Street’

You can pre-order Day Of The Dead from iTunes by clicking here.

You can pre-order Day Of The Dead from Amazon by clicking here.

The June 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Blondie, plus George Martin, Brian Eno, Dexys, The Monkees, Graham Nash, Merle Haggard, Ronnie Spector, Tony Joe White, Frank Zappa, Eric Clapton, The Coral, Max Richter and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Led Zeppelin told they can settle “Stairway To Heaven” lawsuit for $1

0

Led Zeppelin have been told they can settle the “Stairway To Heaven” lawsuit for a $1.

The case was brought against the band by lawyer Francis Malofiy on behalf of Michael Skidmore, administrator of the trust of the late Randy Wolfe, aka Spirit’s Randy California.

Malofiy stated that California should be given a writing credit on the track as it resembles Spirit’s 1968 song “Taurus”.

Zeppelin and Spirit toured together in 1968 and 1969.

According to Bloomberg News, the $1 offer would come at a bigger price: Randy California would need a writing credit on the track as well as a share in its future profits. “It’s always been about credit where credit is due,” said Malofiy.

The case cites a 2008 agreement that Page and Plant made with Warner/Chappell Music, where they receive $60m over 10 years for the company’s right to use “Stairway To Heaven” and other songs.

Malofiy has requested at least two thirds of that amount should be allocated to the infringing period – which adds up to $40m.

Skidmore has said any windfall would support the Randy California Project, which supplies musical instruments and lessons to students at low-income schools in California.

The June 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Blondie, plus George Martin, Brian Eno, Dexys, The Monkees, Graham Nash, Merle Haggard, Ronnie Spector, Tony Joe White, Frank Zappa, Eric Clapton, The Coral, Max Richter and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.