Teenage Fanclub announce new album, Here, and share track, “I’m In Love”

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Teenage Fanclub have announced details of their new studio album.

The band’s tenth studio album, Here will be released September 9 on PeMa via Republic Of Music.

It is available to pre-order by clicking here.

Teenage Fanclub will be touring the UK throughout the Autumn. The band will also be making an exclusive appearance at this year’s End Of The Road festival in September.

They have also shared a track off the album, “I’m In Love“.

https://soundcloud.com/theepema/iminlove

‘Here’ tracklisting:

I’m In Love
Thin Air
Hold On
The Darkest Part Of The Night
I Have Nothing More To Say
I Was Beautiful When I Was Alive
The First Sight
Live In The Moment
Steady State
Its a Sign
With You
Connected To Life


Teenage Fanclub UK live dates:

Saturday 3rd September – BRISTOL – Fleece (SOLD OUT!)
Sunday 4th September – DORSET – End Of The Road festival – get tickets
Monday 5th September – LONDON – Islington Assembly Hall (SOLD OUT!)
Tuesday 6th September – EDINBURGH – Liquid Rooms (SOLD OUT!)
Wednesday 7th September – MANCHESTER – Gorilla (SOLD OUT!)

Tuesday 15th November – INVERNESS – Ironworks
Wednesday 16th November – WHITLEY PLAY – Playhouse (SOLD OUT!)
Thursday 17th November – SHEFFIELD – Leadmill
Friday 18th November – MANCHESTER – Academy 2
Sunday 20th November – LEEDS – University
Monday 21th November – NORWICH – Waterfront
Tuesday 22nd November – LONDON – Electric Ballroom (SOLD OUT!)
Wednesday 23rd November – PORTSMOUTH – Wedgewood Rooms
Thursday 24th November – BRIGHTON – Concorde 2 (SOLD OUT!)
Saturday 26th November – BIRMINGHAM – Institute
Sunday 27th November – CARDIFF – Glee Club (SOLD OUT!)
Monday 28th November – NOTTINGHAM – Rock City
Tuesday 29th November – BRISTOL – Anson Rooms
Wednesday 30th November – CAMBRIDGE – Junction

Tuesday 2nd December – DUBLIN – Academy
Wednesday 3rd December – GLASGOW – Barrowland (SOLD OUT!)
Thursday 4th December – GLASGOW – ABC (SOLD OUT!)

The August 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Neil Young, plus the Small Faces, Jeff Beck, Arthur Lee and Love, Jimmy Webb, Ultravox!, Radiohead, Steve Gunn, Mick Harvey, Fleetwood Mac, Ramones, William Burroughs, Bat For Lashes, Bruce Springsteen and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

August 2016

Neil Young, Love, the Small Faces and Bat For Lashes are all in the new issue of Uncut, dated August 2016 and available in UK shops now and to buy digitally.

Young is on the cover, and inside he discusses his time on the planet, his new live album Earth and his future. “I don’t guarantee anything,” he tells Uncut in Malibu Canyon.

Meanwhile, Stephen Stills, Graham Nash and Promise Of The Real pass judgement on the current state of their capricious friend. “Where do I think Neil is at this point in his life?” says Lukas Nelson. “I think this is where the space ship is taking off in ‘After The Gold Rush’.”

“I’m the same as I was,” says Young. “I know what I want and I won’t accept less… I still do see the vista. I feel good. That’s my way of knowing that I can still continue. There’s no reason to not continue, because I can still see where I’m going. Can’t see it clearly, but I know it’s out there.”

Ten years after the death of Arthur Lee, Uncut learns the whole story of how Love made Forever Changes, and how Lee’s dark LA masterpiece continued to haunt him for the next four decades. “Arthur was one of the few authentic music geniuses I’ve met,” explains Elektra head Jac Holzman. “I haven’t met many. But he had it, and he was crazy.”

Fifty years on from the release of their debut album, Kenney Jones joins friends and fans in a celebration of the East End’s most effervescent band, the Small Faces. “They were the band I really wanted to be in,” Pete Townshend tells us. “They seemed to have fun. By contrast, being in The Who was like being in the effing army.”

Bat For Lashes‘ fourth album, The Bride, is our Album Of The Month, and alongside our extensive review, Natasha Khan tells us about the making of the ambitious record. Elsewhere, Jimmy Webb answers your questions on drinking with Richard Harris, flying a glider over Death Valley without his glasses on, and why Frank Sinatra was “delighted” to find a songwriter like him.

Mick Harvey – former Bad Seed and Birthday Party multi-instrumentalist, and one of PJ Harvey’s most trusted collaborators – takes us through nine key albums in his catalogue, including Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds’ Let Love In, PJ Harvey’s Let England Shake and his new solo album Delirium Tremens.

Supremely talented guitarist Steve Gunn takes Uncut record-shopping and explains why he’s moved from avant-garde instrumentalist to Matador-signed singer-songwriter. “He’s a force to be reckoned with,” says Kurt Vile. “It’s great to watch him evolve.”

Also in the new issue, Ultravox! remember their early experimental high point, “Hiroshima Mon Amour”, and explain how they created the song that effectively invented the ’80s three years early. “I was beginning to see where we needed to be going as a band,” John Foxx tells Uncut, “towards complete electronics, and abandoning conventional instruments.”

Jeff Beck also looks back over his lifetime of reinventing rock music, with conversation taking in The Yardbirds, cricket with Mick Jagger, unfinished business with David Bowie, Rod Stewart’s hair and a few security tips from the FBI. “I used to think of other bands as utter cheats,” Beck says. “The more they rehearsed, the bigger twats [I thought] they were.”

Kamasi Washington takes us through the music that has shaped his life, while we remember Guy Clark and meet Idris Ackamoor and Christine And The Queens in the front section.

Our 40-page reviews section features Radiohead, Bruce Springsteen, Fleetwood Mac, Marvin Gaye, the Ramones, Van Morrison, Band Of Horses, Lou Rhodes, Mudcrutch and more – and films and DVDs including Vinyl and Burroughs: The Movie.

This month’s free CD, The Goldrush, includes tracks from Bat For Lashes, Thee Oh Sees, Lou Rhodes, The Julie Ruin, The Chris Robinson Brotherhood and DM Stith.

The new issue of Uncut is available in UK shops now and to buy digitally

This month in Uncut

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Neil Young, Love, the Small Faces and Bat For Lashes are all in the new issue of Uncut, dated August 2016 and out now.

Young is on the cover, and inside he discusses his time on the planet, his new live album Earth and his future. “I don’t guarantee anything,” he tells Uncut in Malibu Canyon.

Meanwhile, Stephen Stills, Graham Nash and Promise Of The Real pass judgement on the current state of their capricious friend. “Where do I think Neil is at this point in his life?” says Lukas Nelson. “I think this is where the space ship is taking off in ‘After The Gold Rush’.”

“I’m the same as I was,” says Young. “I know what I want and I won’t accept less… I still do see the vista. I feel good. That’s my way of knowing that I can still continue. There’s no reason to not continue, because I can still see where I’m going. Can’t see it clearly, but I know it’s out there.”

Ten years after the death of Arthur Lee, Uncut learns the whole story of how Love made Forever Changes, and how Lee’s dark LA masterpiece continued to haunt him for the next four decades. “Arthur was one of the few authentic music geniuses I’ve met,” explains Elektra head Jac Holzman. “I haven’t met many. But he had it, and he was crazy.”

Fifty years on from the release of their debut album, Kenney Jones joins friends and fans in a celebration of the East End’s most effervescent band, the Small Faces. “They were the band I really wanted to be in,” Pete Townshend tells us. “They seemed to have fun. By contrast, being in The Who was like being in the effing army.”

Bat For Lashes‘ fourth album, The Bride, is our Album Of The Month, and alongside our extensive review, Natasha Khan tells us about the making of the ambitious record. Elsewhere, Jimmy Webb answers your questions on drinking with Richard Harris, flying a glider over Death Valley without his glasses on, and why Frank Sinatra was “delighted” to find a songwriter like him.

Mick Harvey – former Bad Seed and Birthday Party multi-instrumentalist, and one of PJ Harvey’s most trusted collaborators – takes us through nine key albums in his catalogue, including Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds’ Let Love In, PJ Harvey’s Let England Shake and his new solo album Delirium Tremens.

Supremely talented guitarist Steve Gunn takes Uncut record-shopping and explains why he’s moved from avant-garde instrumentalist to Matador-signed singer-songwriter. “He’s a force to be reckoned with,” says Kurt Vile. “It’s great to watch him evolve.”

Also in the new issue, Ultravox! remember their early experimental high point, “Hiroshima Mon Amour”, and explain how they created the song that effectively invented the ’80s three years early. “I was beginning to see where we needed to be going as a band,” John Foxx tells Uncut, “towards complete electronics, and abandoning conventional instruments.”

Jeff Beck also looks back over his lifetime of reinventing rock music, with conversation taking in The Yardbirds, cricket with Mick Jagger, unfinished business with David Bowie, Rod Stewart’s hair and a few security tips from the FBI. “I used to think of other bands as utter cheats,” Beck says. “The more they rehearsed, the bigger twats [I thought] they were.”

Kamasi Washington takes us through the music that has shaped his life, while we remember Guy Clark and meet Idris Ackamoor and Christine And The Queens in the front section.

Our 40-page reviews section features Radiohead, Bruce Springsteen, Fleetwood Mac, Marvin Gaye, the Ramones, Van Morrison, Band Of Horses, Lou Rhodes, Mudcrutch and more – and films and DVDs including Vinyl and Burroughs: The Movie.

This month’s free CD, The Goldrush, includes tracks from Bat For Lashes, Thee Oh Sees, Lou Rhodes, The Julie Ruin, The Chris Robinson Brotherhood and DM Stith.

The new issue of Uncut is out now.

Unreleased Prince music debuts during Italian fashion show

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Unreleased Prince music has premiered during Versace’s menswear presentation at Milan Fashion Week.

As Dazed reports, Prince was friends with Donatella Versace and wrote the song in question as a “personal gift” to her.

“The soundtrack features never-before-heard music by Prince, which was written and recorded as a personal gift to Donatella Versace,” the press notes read. “Donatella would like to use this special occasion as an opportunity to share this incredible music from a dear, and much missed friend.”

In an interview with Billboard, Versace said, “It was a privilege and an honour to have Prince as my friend, and so it was my privilege to be able to share [the unreleased music] with the audience,” Versace added. “I wanted people to hear how playful he was, how joyous, how creative, how pure a genius. The biggest tribute you can pay to him is to play his music, and to keep his memory alive.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PeEckPoEGL8

The August 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Neil Young, plus the Small Faces, Jeff Beck, Arthur Lee and Love, Jimmy Webb, Ultravox!, Radiohead, Steve Gunn, Mick Harvey, Fleetwood Mac, Ramones, William Burroughs, Bat For Lashes, Bruce Springsteen and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Ask Aaron Neville!

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Ahead of the release of his new album, Apache, on July 15, Aaron Neville will be answering your questions as part of our regular An Audience With… feature.

So is there anything you’d like us to ask the great singer?

What are his memories of the New Orleans music scene when he was growing up?
How did the Neville Brothers approach their cover of Tom Waits’ “Down In The Hole” for The Wire?
Has he ever received any advice from his old friend, Keith Richards?

Send up your questions by noon, Monday, June 27 to uncutaudiencewith@timeinc.com.

The best questions, and Aaron’s answers, will be published in a future edition of Uncut magazine.

The August 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Neil Young, plus the Small Faces, Jeff Beck, Arthur Lee and Love, Jimmy Webb, Ultravox!, Radiohead, Steve Gunn, Mick Harvey, Fleetwood Mac, Ramones, William Burroughs, Bat For Lashes, Bruce Springsteen and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Led Zeppelin ask judge to stop “Stairway To Heaven” trial

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Lawyers representing Jimmy Page, Robert Plant and Warner Music have requested American District Judge R. Gary Klausner to halt proceedings in Led Zeppelin’s ongoing copyright infringement trial, according to Billboard.

The trial examines whether Led Zeppelin lifted “Stairway To Heaven” from Spirit’s 1967 instrumental “Taurus“.

Now Zeppelin’s lawyer Peter J. Anderson is calling for a halt to the trial, after three days of testimony during which, he argues, the plaintiff hasn’t established the elements of copyright infringement.

“Although the parties’ pre-trial filings identified what plaintiff Michael Skidmore [the trustee who manages the estate of Spirit songwriter Randy Wolfe] needed to prove to establish his claims, Skidmore failed to prove required elements of his claims for direct, contributory and vicarious copyright infringement,” said Anderson.

During court proceedings, Skidmore’s lawyer Francis Malofiy played “Taurus” alongside “Stairway To Heaven” and tried to ascertain that Page had heard Spirit’s track before writing the Led Zeppelin song. Page denied this, claiming he only heard “Taurus” a few years ago.

Led Zeppelin‘s lawyers are now asking judge Klausner to make a judgement on the case ahead of it resuming later today [June 21].

The August 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Neil Young, plus the Small Faces, Jeff Beck, Arthur Lee and Love, Jimmy Webb, Ultravox!, Radiohead, Steve Gunn, Mick Harvey, Fleetwood Mac, Ramones, William Burroughs, Bat For Lashes, Bruce Springsteen and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Introducing the new issue of Uncut

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The action captured in this month’s Uncut – on sale today in the UK – takes in a wide range of locations. There is a castle in Hollywood, and a place down the road in Malibu Canyon, where a housekeeper burns sage in deference to the tastes of an auspicious house guest, Neil Young. We interrupt Kenney Jones’ tractor driving at his polo club, and learn some useful FBI tips from Jeff Beck on how to make your London flat secure from prying eyes. There is a long train journey to Room 414 of the Gunter Hotel, San Antonio, where Robert Johnson once recorded, and a return visit to Hansa Studios, and the debauched West Berlin of the 1980s.

Perhaps most potently, though, the estimable new guitar virtuoso, Steve Gunn, takes Uncut’s Rob Mitchum to that most sacred of spaces: a second-hand record fair. Gunn, it transpires, is very much a man after our own heart, an insatiable record collector whose devotions range from the canonical to the most eclectic obscurities. He becomes fannishly shy when spotting Lenny Kaye across the stalls at the WFMU Record Fair in Brooklyn, then goes on to buy a diverse clutch of albums by Ian A Anderson, Brij Bhushan Kabra, Anthony Braxton and Joshua Burkett (I can strongly recommend the last of these, but you can read Gunn’s enthusiastic footnotes to all his purchases in the new issue).

As ever, then, this issue of Uncut shapes up as a selection of new angles on and insights from our established heroes – Neil Young, Love, Jeff Beck, The Small Faces, Mick Harvey, Billy Bragg, Jimmy Webb among them – alongside new stars and lost voices who operate in a similar rich tradition. Who knew, for example, the story of how a shipload of synths turned up on one of the remote Cape Verde islands, off the northwest coast of Africa, in the spring of 1968? You can read the full story from Piers Martin, hear an example of the antic kosmische music they enabled – alongside Bat For Lashes, Plaid, Idris Ackamoor, The Julie Ruin, The Chris Robinson Brotherhood, Rhyton, Sara Watkins and loads more – on this month’s free CD .

Every month, the plan is to share a wealth of musical discoveries. Here’s the saxophonist Kamasi Washington talking about Kendrick Lamar’s To Pimp A Butterfly, from this month’s My Life In Music feature. “In popular music these days, the notion is that you have to be simple and bland to appeal to mass audiences,” Washington tells us. “I think this record is anything but that. It’s going to live beyond itself. It’s not just a great record, it’s an important record. Does it inspire me? Yes, it does.”

 

 

Watch the trailer for new documentary, The Beatles: Eight Days A Week – The Touring Years

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The first trailer for the new documentary, The Beatles: Eight Days A Week – The Touring Years, has been released; you can watch it below.

Featuring rare and exclusive footage, the film is directed by Ron Howard and will focus on the time period from the early Beatles’ journey in the days of The Cavern Club in Liverpool to their last concert at Candlestick Park in San Francisco in 1966.

The film receives its world premier at London’s Leicester Square on September 15, 2016; it will play in cinemas for one night only. It will also premier in France and Germany on the same date, in Australia and New Zealand September 16 and then on September 17 it will begin streaming on Hula in the United States.

The August 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Neil Young, plus the Small Faces, Jeff Beck, Arthur Lee and Love, Jimmy Webb, Ultravox!, Radiohead, Steve Gunn, Mick Harvey, Fleetwood Mac, Ramones, William Burroughs, Bat For Lashes, Bruce Springsteen and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

“The Beach Boys are trying to destroy me!”

Today (June 20) is Brian Wilson’s birthday, so it seemed like a good time to post this piece I did with him (and Van Dyke Parks and Andy Paley) back in 1995. Wilson has a latterday reputation as not the most rewarding of interviewees, but I’m pretty sure this is the most revealing piece I’ve ever been fortunate enough to write – he tells me which Beach Boys he could beat up, offers me $100 to get his songs on the radio, and reveals his secret: “If you abstain from having an orgasm for 10 years, you create a void in your brain!”

Quick plug before we start: the feature originally appeared in Vox, at the time a monthly sister publication to NME (I wrote the piece for NME, but it turned out so long we parked it in Vox instead). I exhumed it a few months ago for Uncut’s Ultimate Music Guide to The Beach Boys, which you can buy from our online shop. Thanks!

Nowadays there is shagpile, not sand, beneath the piano legs. Business is conducted at the kitchen table, not in a tent. There are no addled, faux-mystical frauds hanging around, no lysergically charged leeches scuttling round his bed, no star-dazzled psychologists by his shoulder, no heavy-duty minders, no craven and insensitive businessmen picking at that royally fried flesh. No. Life for Brian Wilson is contented; as contented, perhaps, as it has ever been.

Some things, though, are the same. The voices still invade his head from time to time, even if the new medication is teaching them some discipline. The Beach Boys, naturally, are still “fucking assholes”. And the music? Well, that’s hardly changed, either, still retaining that astonishing beauty, that spirituality, that otherworldly naivete which was once, mistakenly, seen as something this remarkable man would grow out of.

“Little surfer, little on, made my heart come all undone/Do you love me, do you surfer girl?”

He’s singing now, sitting at the piano, hammering out a song he wrote some 33 years ago; its innocent sentiments would make most 53-year-old men shy away from it, ashamed. The voice is a little coarser, but there’s still an amazing depth of feeling invested in every last resonating syllable; an adolescent lust transfigured by a yearning, a high melancholy and a profound sense of uncertainty at what the future will hold; and sunny optimism underpinned with doubt, as ever, but now augmented by a powerful, reconciling faith…

The chorus ends, slides into a new bridge, written to comfort the singer in one of his regular emotional slumps. “God shines down his love and mercy/For those in need tonight,” he sings, with a passion and fervour almost strong enough to send the most defiant atheist spinning towards the nearest church. Beautiful? Damn near transcendental.

Finally the song finishes, and reality intervenes.

“If you put ‘Surfer Girl’ on the radio, I’ll give you 100 bucks,” says Brian Wilson, eyeing the tape recorder that’s been whirring round all along. He laughs. “I was feeling a little blue because I thought maybe life had deserted me, so I wrote a fairly sorrowful song. You know, maybe we’ll record it, but I think ‘God shines down his love and mercy for those in need tonight’ is a little personal, a little heavy. I’d rather do something that was similar to ‘Surfer Girl’, but not quite that heavy. Because first of all the punk rockers, the young people, will say: ‘Fuck The Beach Boys, they’re into a prissy little trip like ‘Surfer Girl’… how about some rock’n’roll? It’s all fucked up, it’s all screwed, deranged and hit to hell. Nobody can tell what’s happening.”

This is Brian Wilson in the summer of 1995. Newly wed, fat again and – after more than three decades of severe mental illness, shocking maltreatment and gross indulgence – in odd, stressed but relatively good shape. For the first time in seven years, there are new records to promote: understated, slick reworkings of old classics on I Just Wasn’t Made For These Times and a vocals-only job on Orange Crate Art, his most famous, fated collaborator Van Dyke Parks’ new homage to California. The pressure’s on and, for a man who has spent nearly 30 years in emotional suspension, that can be hard to deal with.

Much of that time has been a nightmare, a succession of soul-squashing depressions punctuated by brutally unsuitable therapy and endless, acrimonious litigation. Sometimes, though, when he speaks, it’s as if none of it has happened. It’s as if we’re back in the Los Angeles of the mid-‘60s, talking to a man preoccupied with Phil Spector, The Beatles and his own enormous, mind-blowing music. It is, perhaps, one of the ways he deals with things. And another?

“I’ve got my secret here. I don’t tell anybody my secret,” confides Brian, still sitting by his piano. “I have a secret… I’ll tell you anyway: I don’t have any sex, OK? The secret is abstaining from orgasm. An Einsteinian formula that if you abstain from having an orgasm for, say, 10 years, you create a void in your brain. In other words, if you don’t express and orgasm for 10 years, it’s a long time, right? Most people think two weeks without an orgasm’s a long time.

“And I did that, y’know? My dad told me in high school: ‘Son, now you’re gonna be going through a lot of hell as you grow up, and the one thing you should never do is you should not have orgasms and masturbate and you should not fuck with girls.’ And I tried it out. I’d been jacking off all summer, y’know? And toward the end of the summer, I’m going into my junior year in high school and my dad lays that on me. I go there and I try it out and I say: ‘What the fuck is this shit? Hey, wait a minute, man, I like <i>not coming<i> better than coming!’ And I kept going that way for a long, long time and finally I came to the conclusion that I’m gonna tell people my secret. But I just don’t want some chick to go: ‘Oh, that’s your secret? Well here, I’ll make you come’… Ain’t that a weird trip?”

Isn’t it just…

Neil Young’s Earth reviewed

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Neil Young’s latest album arrived trailed by a typically unconventional explanation. “We made a live record and every creature on the planet seemed to show up,” Young marvelled on his Facebook page. “Suddenly all the living things of Earth were in the audience going crazy… Earth’s creatures let loose, there were Bee breakdowns, Bird breakdowns and yes, even Wall Street breakdowns, jamming with me and Promise of the Real!”

Earth, then, is the latest broadside in Young’s lengthy, quixotic history of eco-activism that stretches back to 1970’s After The Gold Rush. It is also explicitly linked to last year’s studio album The Monsanto Years, which found Young railing at the bankers “too rich to jail” and the McCorporations who dominate the agricultural industry. He was joined in this latest skirmish by a new backing band, Promise Of The Real – led by Willie Nelson’s sons, Lukas and Micah – who subsequently joined Young on his Rebel Content tour that reaches Europe next month.

Earth is a document of the Rebel Content tour; though it comes with caveats. There are overdubs, Auto-Tune and, most conspicuously of all, songs have been overlaid with animal sounds. You’ll meet an army of frogs who croak contentedly at the end of “Mother Earth”, a flock of geese who rudely honk their way through “Country Home” and a swarm of bees buzzing enthusiastically during the breakdown in “People Want To Hear About Love”. The result pitches Young somewhere between King Lear and David Attenborough: a volatile, intransigent patriarch and doughty champion of the natural world, whose beloved landscape is gradually being eroded by the doctrines of the free market.

Critically, the Rebel Content tour found Young appearing so invigorated by the flexibility of his new charges that he dusted down a number of significant rarities from the cupboard: “Alabama”, “Here We Are In The Years” and “Time Fades Away” among them. Several, like “Vampire Blues”, had not been performed live since the early ’70s. Admittedly, few of these deep cuts make the album’s tracklisting. Instead, Earth loosely traces the arc of Young’s environmental concerns from the 1970s to the present day, corralling together like-minded songs from across the decades. “Vampire Blues” is an assault on the rapacious oil industry, “Country Home” extols the pleasures of rural living while Young’s dreamy sci-fi parable “After The Gold Rush” prophesies environmental catastrophe. Even the Crosby-baiting “Hippie Dream” evokes a bucolic time “when the river was wide and the water came running down”, before it reaches its grim denouement “in an ether-filled room of meat-hooks”.

Hearing a near-run of “Western Hero”, “Hippie Dream”, “Vampire Blues” and “Human Highway” – the deepest cuts here – is genuinely thrilling. Promise Of The Real are respectful of the source but not excessively deferential. They bring agility and a lithe muscularity to the songs. On “Wolf Moon”, they recall the folksy strum of the Stray Gators while on “People Want To Hear About Love” they get their heads down for a rugged Crazy Horse-style choogle. Young, clearly, is having a ball. He seems happy to allow some excitable squirrels nibble at “Vampire Blues” and he noticeably Auto-Tunes the backing vocals on “Western Hero”. It’s possible that Young is using Auto-Tune as a metaphor for genetic modification, artificially augmenting his own work to make a point.

Young has done this kind of thing before – Rust Never Sleeps (making its DVD and Blu-ray debut this month along with Human Highway) was heavily overdubbed in the studio after the initial shows at San Francisco’s Boarding House – but clearly not to this level. The new harmonies Young furnishes “After The Gold Rush” with are spectacular – serene and hymnal – while Young overdubs the original French horn part from the studio album before field recordings of a dawn chorus play the song out. That said, he’s like a kid at Christmas with the effects. Especially on “Big Box”, whose feedback-drenched climax gives way to birds cawing, the parp of a car horn, cattle lowing, wind whistles and the sound of rocket fire and explosions – all in the last 30 seconds. It feels like the aural equivalent of the onstage theatrics he used for the Alchemy tour – the scurrying scientists and technicians, the crumbled balls of paper blown across the stage like tumbleweed. You might wonder why Young would mess around with some of his best-loved songs in this way. But then you might similarly wonder why he decided to release an album recorded in an antique Voice-O-Graph booth at the same time as he was promoting a high-end 24-bit 192khz audio player. It’s Neil’s world, we just live in it.

The set ends with a propulsive 28-minute version of “Love And Only Love”. At one point, the song fades into soft, ambient tones before waves of feedback rise up and it resembles the apocalyptic live coda to “Walk Like A Giant”. Props to drummer Anthony Logerfo and bassist Corey McCormick for holding it together over such distance. The skills displayed by Promise Of The Real on this album tacitly query whether Young really needs to call again on his faithful old lieutenants, Crazy Horse. This younger, sprightlier outfit may not have the iconic heft of Crazy Horse but they offer Young the opportunity to cover more ground. It would be a shame if the Horse didn’t at least get the valedictory tour that guitarist “Poncho” Sampredro hoped would happen when we spoke to him for our January 2015 issue. “Most people turn a corner, Neil ricochets,” he told us. True, that. But as the farmyard chorus cluck, whinny, squawk and chirp their approval at the album’s close, it’s possible that Young is enjoying forward momentum with Promise Of The Real. Maybe the horse braying appreciatively during “Country Home” isn’t a metaphor, after all.

Neil Young is on the cover of the new issue of Uncut, which is UK shops from Tuesday, June 21

Follow me on Twitter @MichaelBonner

The July 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Prince, plus Carole King, Paul Simon, case/lang/viers, Laurie Anderson, 10CC, Wilko Johnson, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Steve Gunn, Ryan Adams, Lift To Experience, David Bowie and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Lera Lynn – Resistor

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It’s remarkable how TV themes can transform an artist’s fortunes, especially when it comes to True Detective. The acclaimed first season of the HBO drama took “Far From Any Road”, an obscure Handsome Family tune that was already over ten years old by 2014, and hoisted the cult duo onto the international stage. Within months, and umpteen millions of social media hits later, the song had been co-opted by Guns N’Roses as intro music for their world tour and, altogether more impressively, achieved the ultimate pop culture accolade by fetching up on an episode of The Simpsons. For a band who align themselves to the decidedly uncommercial world of Doc Boggs and Harry Smith, it wasn’t bad going at all.

A similar fate befell Lera Lynn last year. She might not yet have made it to the fictional environs of Springfield, but the general consensus is that the Nashville singer-songwriter was the best thing about True Detective’s otherwise patchy second series. Her appearance as the resident turn in a near-empty bar, dispensing sad-slow songs through the creeping gloom of the Black Rose, brought her a fair chunk of mainstream attention. By September she was undertaking her first major headline tour of the US and had just signed a new global publishing deal.

Newcomers to her music might’ve been forgiven for thinking that Lynn had sprung from nowhere. In truth, she’s been around for a while. 2011 debut Have You Met Lera Lynn?, recorded while the Texas-born singer was still living in Georgia, where she’d been raised, was a bewitching set that adhered to the same old-school Patsy-and-Loretta values as fellow countryphiles like Neko Case or Caitlin Rose. Then it all went quiet as Lynn regrouped her thoughts and upped sticks for Nashville, casting around for new management and a fresh backing band.

Finally, in 2014, she emerged with an EP, “Lying In The Sun”, and an overdue second album, The Avenues. Both offered ample evidence that she’d lost none of her powers, allied to a newfound sense of dislocation in songs that twanged and cried steel with persuasive grace.

It’s tempting to think that the True Detective experience has, to some degree, fed its way into her latest opus, Resistor. Certainly, it’s rich in atmosphere, Lynn and co-producer Joshua Grange evoking the kind of torchy, spectral noir that informs the best work of Cowboy Junkies or Mazzy Star. But there’s also a less tangible, sinister element at play here, as if everything has been tilted slightly off centre. The house of shadows that is “Run The Night”, for instance, carries a cockeyed piano refrain that sounds like a backwards lullaby, serving as a neat signifier for the album itself. Many of these songs are similarly ambiguous, at least from a lyrical drift. Lynn often portrays romantic love as a scarred province where betrayal and deceit are as common as tenderness and lust. Hard metaphors drive home the point: gunpowder, arrows, blades, chains and the like.

The key musical flavours are Grange’s tremolo guitar, an agent of tone and mood rather than straight-up riffing, and Lynn’s expertly weighted voice. Between them, and in keeping with the spontaneous nature of the album sessions, they tackle every instrument on Resistor, with the exception of Robby Handley’s bass. This tends to keep things taught and economical throughout, a knobbly bassline enough to convey the tension of “What You Done”, with Lynn’s drawled words hinting at some terrible buried secret. “Slow Motion Countdown”, too, is an ominous waltz marked by the soft tick of guitar and a measured beat that feels like someone slapping a heavy fist at the door.

There are nimble changes of temperature as well. Opener “Shape Shifter” is a punchy piece of leftfield-ish rock with Lynn in strident mode. As is “Drive”, a highway song of escape whose baritone guitar and insistent groove echo the idea of wheels burning across cool midnight tarmac.

One of the most arresting moments is “For The Last Time”, which traces the passage through life of someone nearing their endgame. “They’ll roll her down the hall tonight/For the last time”, Lynn sings with open-throated abandon. “Nearly a century done/Love, life, gain, loss… It’s a rough road on this way out.” Accented by wordless harmonies, it was written, Lynn says, for her late grandmother. Like most everything on this beguiling album of minor-key pleasures, it’s blessed with both stoic resolve and real emotional heft. Not to mention a very singular, haunted allure.

Q&A
LERA LYNN
What made you go for a more experimental approach this time around?

The plan was to just try different things, which meant that the record ended up taking on a style and sound of its own. Joshua and I had a really clear vision of the production style and the approach to the instruments. For example, we didn’t want to use a drummer because we didn’t want the muscle memory of it. We wanted something that was very simple instead. So that was me in a lot of instances. I’m not a drummer, but I can lay down a beat.

There seems to be a lot of break-up songs with hard metaphors of guns and arrows…
I was thinking of the double-edged sword of love, these gifts that are meant to express admiration but which are cutting you and hurting you. It does feel like there are some similar sentiments being expressed along those lines, kind of hanging onto the last shred of hope and love. Am I writing from experience? Yes and no!

Has True Detective made a noticeable difference to your profile in the States?
It certainly has. The biggest difference I’ve noticed is in touring. Many more people are coming to the shows and I guess they’re buying records as well. It’s been really helpful for me, because not having a major label means it’s difficult to gain the level of exposure that you need to make this career sustainable. It’s inspiring to discover that there’s an appreciation of more introspective and unsettling music out there.
INTERVIEW: ROB HUGHES

The August 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Neil Young, plus the Small Faces, Jeff Beck, Arthur Lee and Love, Jimmy Webb, Ultravox!, Radiohead, Steve Gunn, Mick Harvey, Fleetwood Mac, Ramones, William Burroughs, Bat For Lashes, Bruce Springsteen and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

End Of The Road Festival: latest news update

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The End Of The Road festival have announced more details of this year’s event, which runs from September 1 – 4 at Larmer Tree Gardens, Dorset.

Ezra Furman, Beak>, Teleman and John Johanna have been added to the bill.

The Shins will open the festival and play their first UK show in over four years on The Woods Stage on Thursday night.

Animal Collective will headline The Woods Stage on Friday night, Bat For Lashes on Saturday while Joanna Newsom will close The Woods Stage on Sunday – playing her only UK festival this year.

Meanwhile Beak> headline the Big Top on Friday, Steve Mason on the Saturday and Teenage Fanclub on the Sunday.

Headliners on the Garden Stage are Cat Power (Friday), Ezra Furman (Saturday) and Thee Oh Sees (Sunday).

Uncut will be hosting events in the Tipi Tent Stage again this year; check back here for updates.

You can find more details about tickets and the line-up at the festival’s website.

The August 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Neil Young, plus the Small Faces, Jeff Beck, Arthur Lee and Love, Jimmy Webb, Ultravox!, Radiohead, Steve Gunn, Mick Harvey, Fleetwood Mac, Ramones, William Burroughs, Bat For Lashes, Bruce Springsteen and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Brian Eno and Johnny Marr urge UK citizens to vote against Brexit

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Brian Eno is among a number of musicians to urge British citizens to vote to remain in the European Union at Thursday’s referendum.

Posting on his Facebook page, Eno wrote, “I have a lot of misgivings about the way the EU is run, but they don’t make me want to ditch the whole idea. I feel the EU is one of the only restraints on the kind of neo-liberal market fundamentalism that has seen inequality rising throughout the world. I feel that it has been a net force for good in promoting enlightened social and environmental agendas. It could and should be doing a better job at all these things, but to do any job at all it needs our support.”

He added: “The only good outcome of this referendum is that it might remind us what the original mission of the EU was, and might motivate us to actually make it happen.”

Meanwhile, Johnny Marr has spoken out about the tactics of the Leave campaign, comparing UKIP’s “breaking point” poster to Nazi propaganda.

The August 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Neil Young, plus the Small Faces, Jeff Beck, Arthur Lee and Love, Jimmy Webb, Ultravox!, Radiohead, Steve Gunn, Mick Harvey, Fleetwood Mac, Ramones, William Burroughs, Bat For Lashes, Bruce Springsteen and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Morrissey berates Buzzcocks for McDonald’s ad

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Morrissey has launched a scathing attack against Buzzcocks for allowing their song “What Do I Get?” to appear on a TV commercial for McDonald’s.

A noted vegetarian, Morrissey took to his quasi-official website, True To You to criticise the ad.

“Please, somebody, tell me it’s just a bad dream …,” he wrote.

Pete Shelley has allowed McDonald’s to use Buzzcocks’ What do I get? to TV advertise McDonald’s new Big Flavour (the flavour being sawdust) Chicken Wraps?!

“In the words of another Buzzcocks song: oh shit…”

The ad features on the website for Campaign.

According to the description, “The ad features a young man pulling up to a McDonald’s drive through, where he meets and becomes enamoured by the teen punk who serves him.”

The August 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Neil Young, plus the Small Faces, Jeff Beck, Arthur Lee and Love, Jimmy Webb, Ultravox!, Radiohead, Steve Gunn, Mick Harvey, Fleetwood Mac, Ramones, William Burroughs, Bat For Lashes, Bruce Springsteen and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

David Bowie tribute to headline Glastonbury’s Park Stage

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An orchestral tribute to David Bowie is set to headline the Park Stage at Glastonbury this weekend.

In a special collaboration for the festival, Philip Glass’s Heroes Symphony will be performed by a classical ensemble featuring Army of Generals and members of the British Paraorchestra, conducted by Charles Hazlewood.

The performance will be complimented by an immersive light performance by light artist, Chris Levine.

Said Glass, “When Charles Hazlewood told me of his plan to take my Heroes Symphony to Glastonbury, I was delighted. It’s very exciting to think of it playing – at the midnight hour – out across the parkland, a true celebration of Bowie. I am so very pleased members of the British Paraorchestra and Chris Levine’s epic iy_project light performance will be part of it – what a spectacular collaboration.

“This is sound and vision Bowie-style!!”

Glass’ Heroes Symphony was composed in 1996.

“I don’t think it’s possible to overstate the seismic shock experienced by millions of us at the news of David Bowie’s death,” Hazlewood. “Literally the last thing anyone imagined, I mean, Bowie was forever, right? Speaking personally he was a cornerstone of my life, a fundamental, as important as Mozart, and for me, that is saying a lot.

“In wondering how to come to terms with it – and as a musician, what music I might play which reflected both my agonised numbness at his passing, and the sheer lust-for-life joy his music has always given me – I realised with a leaping heart that we must play Philip Glass’s Heroes Symphony! Here is a wonderfully intense symphonic journey, which takes the musical essence of Bowie’s Heroes, and re-expresses it through Glass’s un-mistakable and hypnotic brand of alchemy: a 45 minute symphonic meditation setting the ghosts of Bowie’s (and Eno’s) creation in poetic, shining relief, through the filter of another, equally iconoclastic and unique genius.

“Bowie was a huge fan of Glass, citing him as a primary influence. If Bowie had any interest in what might be played by all of us after he’d gone, then I reckon a world class orchestra breathing fire into Glass’s Heroes Symphony would make him very happy indeed. And with the added genius of laser virtuoso Chris Levine creating a visual counterpoint to Glass’s luminescent textures, this will be the most extraordinary sound and vision ever witnessed at Glastonbury.”

The August 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Neil Young, plus the Small Faces, Jeff Beck, Arthur Lee and Love, Jimmy Webb, Ultravox!, Radiohead, Steve Gunn, Mick Harvey, Fleetwood Mac, Ramones, William Burroughs, Bat For Lashes, Bruce Springsteen and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Peter Gabriel releases new song, “I’m Amazing”

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Peter Gabriel has today released a new song, “I’m Amazing”.

The track, inspired by the life of Muhammad Ali, was published on Gabriel’s YouTube channel this morning (June 17).

The 7-minute track is his first new material since “Show Yourself” appeared in the 2013 live album and film Back To Front: Live in London.

“I wrote [I’m Amazing] a few years back, which was, in part, inspired by Muhammad Ali’s life and struggles,” said Gabriel in a press release. “At the time of his death, when so many people are celebrating his life and thinking about all he achieved, it seemed the right time to release it.”

On Tuesday, Gabriel embarks on a tour of the USA/Canada, performing together and apart with Sting. The pair last toured together with Amnesty International in 1986 and 1988. In a video announcing the tour dates, Gabriel promises fans “something unfamiliar as well as the hits”.

The July 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Prince, plus Carole King, Paul Simon, case/lang/viers, Laurie Anderson, 10CC, Wilko Johnson, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Steve Gunn, Ryan Adams, Lift To Experience, David Bowie and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

Wilko Johnson: “After Going Back Home, I would like to make more albums”

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Wilko Johnson would love to make a follow-up to 2014’s Going Back Home, recorded with The Who’s Roger Daltrey, he tells us in the current issue of Uncut, dated July 2016 and out now.

The guitarist and songwriter discusses the best albums of his career, from Dr Feelgood’s 1975 debut, Down By The Jetty, and Ian Dury & The Blockheads’ Laughter (1980), right up to Going Back Home.

“We’re doing a little tour at the moment,” Johnson says, “and the gigs have just been going so well. I’m having a really good time playing. I would like to make more albums in fact, though at the minute I have been rather preoccupied with writing that book [Wilko’s autobiography, Don’t You Leave Me Here: My Life].

“The feelings I got, the highs I got off it,” he explains, discussing the supposedly terminal cancer he was given the all-clear from, “thinking, ‘Wow, I’m going to leave this world’, and then looking at the world around you thinking, ‘Oh God! Ain’t it fantastic!'”

Don’t You Leave Me Here: A Life is out now on Little, Brown.

The July 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Prince, plus Carole King, Paul Simon, case/lang/viers, Laurie Anderson, 10CC, Wilko Johnson, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Steve Gunn, Ryan Adams, Lift To Experience, David Bowie and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

The National, Grizzly Bear and more on their all-star Grateful Dead tribute album

Five years in the making, The National’s mammoth all-star tribute to the Grateful Dead is finally complete. Uncut talks to the many and varied artists – among them My Morning Jacket, Lee Ranaldo, Yo La Tengo, Grizzly Bear and Dead outrider Bruce Hornsby – about the enduring power of Garcia and co’s music, and the challenges of turning on a new generation. “This could be a bridge,” says Aaron Dessner. “All this is about the future of this music.” Story: Rob Mitchum. Originally published in Uncut’s May 2016 issue (Take 228).

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Once upon a time there were two bands called The Warlocks. On the West Coast, one set of Warlocks changed their name and became the standard-bearers of the psychedelic scene. On the opposite side of the country, the other Warlocks changed their name, sang of even harder drugs, and pushed the limits of experimental rock.

One Warlocks became the Grateful Dead, creating and influencing a jamband scene that survived stubbornly on the fringes of mainstream rock. The other became The Velvet Underground, founding fathers of punk, alternative and indie rock.

For 50 years, these two lineages remained almost entirely separate, two rock tribes that rarely cross-pollinated. But this spring, a massive new charity tribute album curated by members of The National promises to reconcile these Warlock descendants, officially welcoming the Dead into the stable of indie-rock influences and, perhaps, setting the band’s legacy for its second half-century.

Day Of The Dead, in the works for almost five years, comprises more than five hours of covers from a roster that reads like a Coachella poster. Members of indie forefathers Sonic Youth, Wilco and Pavement, modern-day headliners My Morning Jacket, Mumford & Sons, and The War On Drugs, and left-field contributors such as composer Terry Riley, African legends Orchestra Baobab, and ambient experimentalist Tim Hecker appear, all paying tribute to a band that was once toxic territory for the indie-inclined.

In its size and scope, the compilation also cracks open the stereotype that the Dead and their post-Jerry Garcia spinoffs were little more than country-rock noodlers, a travelling museum of tie-dyed ’60s nostalgia. Lesser-known components of the Dead’s sound – pastoral folk, avant-garde noise, prog complexity, jazz-level improvisation – come to the fore as artists interpret more obscure pieces of the Dead’s long history. “We wanted to explore some corners of the Dead’s catalogue that people don’t know about,” says Aaron Dessner, guitarist for The National and organiser of the compilation. “We wanted to shine a light on the songwriting as much as we could, but also the experimental aspects of the Dead, and do that across their whole history, from early output to latter-day Dead, and the last great songs they wrote.”

The Allman Brothers Band – Live From A&R Studios, New York

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The Allmans became New York City’s adopted house band in 1971, thanks primarily to Bill Graham, who booked them into the Fillmore East whenever possible. On August 26, two months after headlining the venue’s closing weekend and a month after the release of their breakout LP At Fillmore East, the bandmembers set up as they would for a session in the big tracking room of Phil Ramone’s A&R Studios for a live broadcast on free-form New York station WPLJ, with the renowned producer personally recording the set to eight-track tape.

During the 67-minute performance, the road-tested, high-revving band were firing on all six cylinders, emphatically displaying their unique approach, a seamless fusion of tightly structured roadhouse blues and adventurous, musically elevated improvisation at once primal and sophisticated. The Allmans’ instrumental makeup – two guitars, two drum kits, bass and keys – and their ability to launch into epic explorations out of the song framework had been pioneered by the Grateful Dead, but nobody, not even the Dead themselves, could touch this heady, virtuosic crew on the concert stage, as denizens of the Fillmore East had discovered to their mind-blown delight during the previous year and a half.

The broadcast has been heavily booted from compressed off-the-air recordings, triggering endless debates among the fanatics as to whether the A&R Studios performance rivals or trumps the At Fillmore East and closing Fillmore shows. Now, with the first official release of the recording, newly mixed from the multi-tracks, we can finally compare them on a level playing field. Ramone’s sound is tighter and drier than Tom Dowd’s bright, reverberant Fillmore recordings, bringing a greater sense of intimacy to the interaction, and mix engineer Suha Gur has wisely placed Duane Allman and Dickey Betts’ guitars to the left and right channels, respectively, bringing enhanced drama to their enthralling give and take, and inviting headphone geek-outs. Unlike their stage setup, the players arranged themselves in a semicircle, enabling them to closely follow each other’s moves, rendering the interaction even more nuanced. The resulting performance is as close to perfection as the original lineup ever achieved.

Bandleader Duane Allman’s setlist for the broadcast mirrored what The ABB played in their live performances throughout 1971, but the climactic “Whipping Post”, which stretched to 23 minutes on At Fillmore East, was dropped because of time restraints. You can sense the players warming up their musical muscles on the standard set opener, Blind Willie McTell’s “Statesboro Blues”, before kicking into gear on Muddy Waters’ “Trouble No More”, with its strutting groove and howling dual slides, which leads into a taut and fiery take on Gregg Allman’s “Don’t Keep Me Wonderin’”.

In the Layla-like money solo that propels the number to its wild-ass payoff, Duane pulls back hard against the beat as if he had stick-um on his Coricidin bottleneck, and the band slows the groove right in sync. Here you get the distinct sense, which continues through the rest of the performance, that Duane is conducting the band with his Les Paul and his body language. Gregg switches from B3 to piano on Elmore James’ “Trouble No More”, the combination of his barrelhouse plinking and the second-line groove transporting the song from Chicago to New Orleans. The guitar interplay is especially delectable on a scalding run-through of the James-penned “One Way Out”, as Betts progressively jacks up the establishing riff while Duane darts in and out like an agitated wasp.

At this point, the band further ups the ante. Berry Oakley provides the glue throughout a sublime take on Betts’ instrumental “In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed” with a percolating bassline that’s mathematically precise, McCartney-like in its melodiousness and deeply funky, as the band seamlessly rolls through the instrumental’s shifts in tone, texture and intensity. For my money, this is the definitive live version of the piece.

Gregg’s vocal and Duane’s slide solo conspire to bring a captivating soulfulness to the T-Bone Walker slow-blues mainstay “Stormy Monday”, deepening the mood at a serendipitous moment, just before Duane steps up to the mic and spontaneously pours his heart out in tribute to R’n’B sax great King Curtis, who’d been stabbed to death in front of his Manhattan apartment two weeks earlier. Duane and his fallen friend had done a lot of session work together, and both had played with Delaney & Bonnie & Friends during a previous WPLJ broadcast.

After raving about Aretha Franklin and Stevie Wonder’s performance of Curtis ’64 classic “Soul Serenade” at the funeral, Duane decides on the spot to do the song and figures out on the spot to combine it with Willie Cobb’s “You Don’t Love Me”, which the Allmans regularly performed, though it hadn’t been part of the night’s setlist. Thus begins a stunning 19-minute musical exorcism during which Duane leads his bandmates through the stages of grief in a medley that stands as one of the most emotionally withering performances of his all-too-brief career. From there, they close the set with a rendition of the band-composed “Hot’ lanta”, reaching a free-jazz-like intensity in an ecstatic expression of release.

The A&R Studios set would be Duane’s final performance in the city where he’d cemented his greatness. Two months later, on October 29, the 24-year-old artist died when he lost control of his Harley back home in Macon, just after cashing his first ever royalty cheque.

The July 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Prince, plus Carole King, Paul Simon, case/lang/viers, Laurie Anderson, 10CC, Wilko Johnson, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Steve Gunn, Ryan Adams, Lift To Experience, David Bowie and more plus 40 pages of reviews and our free 15-track CD

Uncut: the spiritual home of great rock music.

The 20th Uncut Playlist Of 2016

Some songs that may, in a small way, act as a balm in these times of fear and derangement. Please especially check out the new tune from Scott Hirsch, who some of you may recognise as the regular bassist/engineer in Hiss Golden Messenger. Following William Tyler, Phil Cook et al, he’s the latest member of the extended Hiss family to branch out solo: if you liked the Golden Gunn collab with Steve Gunn, or indeed JJ Cale, this one may well be for you…

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1 Ryley Walker – Golden Sings That Have Been Sung (Dead Oceans)

2 The Avalanches – Wildflower (XL)

3 Rosali – Good Life (Siltbreeze)

4 Tamam Shud – Evolution (Anthology)

5 Psychic Temple – Plays Music For Airports (Joyful Noise)

6 Head Technician – Zones (Ecstatic)

7 Marielle V Jakobsons – Star Core (Thrill Jockey)

8 Hans Chew – Unknown Sire (Divided By Zero)

9 Chris Abrahams – Fluid To The Influence (Room40)

10 Cass McCombs – Mangy Love (Anti-)

11 The Skiffle Players – Skifflin’ (Spiritual Pajamas)

12 Various Artists – Quiero Creedence (Decca)

13 Haley Bonar – Impossible Dream (Memphis Industries)

14 Teenage Fanclub – I’m In Love (PeMa)

15 Christine & The Queens – Chaleur Humaine (Because)

16 The Grateful Dead – Live At Red Rocks Amphitheatre, Morrison, CO 7/8/78 (Rhino)

17 Scott Hirsch – Blue Rider Songs (Scissortail)

18 Danny Brown – When It Rains (Warp)

19 Sarathy Korwar – Day To Day (Ninja Tune x Steve Reid Foundation)

20 Horse Lords – Interventions (Northern Spy)

21 Rafi Bookstaber – Late Summer (Woodsist)

22 Cool Ghouls – Animal Races (Melodic)

23 Sam Coomes – Bugger Me (Domino)

24 Natural Information Society & Bitchin Bajas – Autoimaginary (Drag City)

25 Hieroglyphic Being – The Discos Of Imhotep (Technicolour)