David Byrne announces art exhibition on neuroscience

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David Byrne has announced details of a new exhibition, The Institute Presents: Neurosociety, which will run from October 28 to May 31 at Pace Gallery in Menlo Park, California.

According to the New York Times, Byrne and his collaborator, Mala Gaonkar, a London hedge fund manager, have created room-size installations where visitors can undergo a number of cognitive experiments.

In a statement, Byrne and Gaonkar said: “Experiments, we feel, are a form of theatre. We have adopted elements of art installation and immersive theatre to present these experiences in ways we think will be as engaging for others as they have been for us.

“We traveled and met with many scientists who generously welcomed us, patiently answered our untutored questions, and creatively collaborated with us on this project. In the course of creating The Institute, the work of our partner labs has become both a window and a mirror through which we view ourselves and our larger interactions with the world.

“We wanted to share these concepts with as many people as possible.”

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Gillian Welch announces Boots No 1: The Official Revival Bootleg

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Gillian Welch will release Boots No 1: The Official Revival Bootleg on November 25 on the Acony label.

Boots No 1 celebrates the 20th anniversary of Welch’s Revival album and has been curated and produced by Gillian Welch and David Rawlings – alongside archivist Glen Chausse – to mine selections from their extensive vault of analog tape recordings.

The two-disc set will feature 8 previously unreleased songs, and include 21 outtakes, alternate versions, and demos from the making of the album such as the earliest home demo of “Orphan Girl” which was recorded on a four track and the rarity “Georgia Road”, a song that was only performed live once.

The album will be available on CD and digitally and is available for pre order here.

The tracklisting for Boots No 1 is:

Disc One
Orphan Girl (Alternate Version)
Annabelle (Alternate Version)
Pass You By (Alternate Version)
Go On Downtown (Revival Outtake) *
Red Clay Halo (Revival Outtake)
By The Mark (Alternate Mix)
Paper Wings (Demo)
Georgia Road (Revival Outtake) *
Tear My Stillhouse Down (Home Demo)
Only One and Only (Alternate Version)

Disc Two
Orphan Girl (Home Demo)
I Don’t Want to Go Downtown (Revival Outtake) *
455 Rocket (Revival Outtake) *
Barroom Girls (Live Radio)
Wichita (Revival Outtake) *
One More Dollar (Alternate Version)
Dry Town (Demo) *
Paper Wings (Alternate Mix)
Riverboat Song (Revival Outtake) *
Old Time Religion (Revival Outtake) *
Acony Bell (Demo)

*previously unreleased

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Watch Radiohead cover The Smiths

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Radiohead covered The Smiths during their set at Austin City Limits Music Festival in Austin’s Zilker Park.

The band briefly played “How Soon Is Now?” before launching into their own “2+2=5”, from Hail To The Thief.

You can watch the footage below.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BLCGmPBDyUR/

As Pitchfork reports, the band previously covered The Smiths’ “The Headmaster Ritual” during a webcast in 2007.

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Neil Young debuts four new songs live

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Neil Young has debuted four new songs live during the same show.

Young and The Promise Of The Real played Telluride Town Park, Telluride, Colorado on Friday, September 30.

During the set, they unveiled four songs, which Sugar Mountain – the website that documents Young’s setlists – has listed as being called “Hang Gliders“, “Texas Rangers“, “Peace Trail” and “Show Me“.

You can watch “Show Me” below.

The following night – Saturday – Young have another new song its live debut: “Indian Givers“. Young released the song a few weeks ago, you can watch the video by clicking here.

Young’s upcoming shows are:

October 3: Outlaw Field, Boise, Idaho, USA
October 04: USANA Amphitheatre, West Valley City, Utah, USA
October 06: AVA Amphitheater, Tucson, Arizona, USA
October 08: Desert Trip, Indio, California, USA
October 12: Fox Theater Pomona, Pomona, California, USA
October 13: Fox Theater Pomona, Pomona, California, USA
October 15: Desert Trip, Indio, California, USA
October 22: Bridge School Benefit 30, Mountain View, California, USA
October 23: Bridge School Benefit 30, Mountain View, California, USA

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Ray Charles – The Atlantic Years – In Mono

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Ray Charles was only 22 years old when he was signed to Atlantic Records, but he was already a veteran in the industry. As a teenager growing up in Florida, he learned to read music using braille and played piano at school dances before graduating to gigging with big bands in Tampa and Orlando. In 1948, he moved to Seattle, Washington, where he established himself as a star on the juke circuit. By the time he joined the Atlantic roster, he had already released around 20 singles and notched a handful of minor R’n’B hits. The Atlantic Years – In Mono, a 7LP box that covers his tenure at the label, shows how Charles built on that modest success through experimentation and strident innovation, not only becoming one of the biggest artists of the decade but exerting an immeasurable influence on the next 60 years of American popular music.

In the 1940s and into the 1950s, Ray Charles had established himself as an excitable performer, with an encyclopedic repertoire, a soulful voice and nimble fingers on the keys. But he was somewhat unformed as a recording artist and was still finding his voice and developing a personal musical style. When he started working with Atlantic, the label was still in its infancy: small, but ambitious. Co-founder and president Ahmet Ertegun gave Charles complete freedom to record whatever, whenever, and wherever he pleased, and Charles tinkered with blues, jazz, pop, R’n’B, even country. Because Atlantic wasn’t feeding him songs to record, Charles had to improvise. He adapted hymns and old gospel numbers to a nightclub setting, altering the words to extol romantic instead of heavenly love. “I Got A Woman” and “Hallelujah I Love Her So”, released in 1955 and 1956 respectively, translated the ecstasy of the church to the pop charts, which proved highly controversial but incredibly successful.

What comes through most clearly on The Atlantic Years is a lively and deeply curious musical personality, that of a man who in every song conveys ecstatic joy at the limitless possibilities of musical expression. Listening to these 14 sides, you’re never in doubt that it’s the same artist singing and pounding the piano on every song, growing more confident and more identifiably himself with every note.

These seven LPs can be loosely divided into two varieties: instrumental and vocal. The former show Charles playing jazz in a blues setting, showcasing his eloquent phrasing and his dynamic backing bands. Released in 1957, The Great Ray Charles was his first foray into what David Ritz (see sidebar) refers to in the liner notes as “soul jazz”, a genre that enjoyed a brief mid-century craze, yet this album is the weakest in the set, a collection of relatively tentative performances that establish only the most general of moods. Much better is 1961’s The Genius After Hours, which was recorded during the same sessions but portrays Charles as a more resourceful pianist. His playing is witty and daring, with a new determination that on the rambunctious “Joy Ride” borders on fearlessness.

Those instrumental soul jazz records were intended to define Charles as a serious pop artist rather than a teenybopper idol, although his pop singles were already competing with the white rock’n’rollers. Some of his biggest hits are collected on the vocal LPs in The Atlantic Years, where he truly shines. Even in his early twenties, Charles sang with the voice of a much older man, and he seems to relish the raw grain in his vocals especially on 1961’s The Genius Sings The Blues. The mood alternates between the exquisitely mournful “Feelin’ Sad” and the exuberantly lascivious “Night Time Is the Right Time”.

A handsome set that re-creates the original packaging of each album, The Atlantic Years chronicles a young artist gaining technical as well as aesthetic control over his art. The music isn’t especially rare; most of the albums are available individually and all of them were included in the 2005 set Pure Genius: The Complete Atlantic Recordings (1952-1959), which features two collaborations with jazz vibraphonist Milt Jackson and a live set from the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival. By comparison, The Atlantic Years is hardly definitive, but the point of this set is that one small word in the title: mono.

None of these records have been in print in their original mono for half a century, which is a shame because they’re much more forceful and insistent in this setting. Charles’ piano playing in particular sounds both more percussive and insinuating, adding a wink to many of these songs, a sly nudge that hints at larger ideas and emotions just outside the parameters of the arrangements. Perhaps most crucially, mono intensifies the interplay between the bandleader and his backing musicians: the adventurous grooves, the wild calls and responses, the intimate backdrops against which he preaches and confesses and cajoles. It seems almost miraculous that he managed to capture such volatile performances on tape.

The nature of the recording industry in the 1950s necessarily skews the chronology of this set. Not only was Atlantic releasing compilations of singles released months and even years apart, but the label continued mining Charles’ sessions even after he had defected to ABC-Paramount. Although his tenure at Atlantic ended in 1959, much of this music wasn’t officially released until the early 1960s, when “Georgia On My Mind” and “Hit The Road Jack” had sent him hurtling up the pop charts.

So it’s best not to approach The Atlantic Years as a strict timeline. This is the rare set that is perhaps best heard with no regard for history. Instead, pick an LP at random, throw it on the turntable, lower the needle and turn up the volume. Jumble the chronology, just as Charles jumbled style and genre. In any sequence, the transitions between albums and songs can be rewarding and revelatory. Cue up the sublime R’n’B rollick of “I Got A Woman” on 1957’s Ray Charles to bleed into the barfly soul-jazz workout “Hornful Soul” on 1961’s The Genius After Hours. Or jump from the luscious lament “I Wonder Who” on 1961’s The Genius Sings The Blues to the impossibly brassy fanfare that opens “Let The Good Times Roll” on 1959’s The Genius Of Ray Charles.

This scrambled approach unsticks the songs from their era and underscores just how lively and vivid – and, yes, just how timeless – the music actually is. It’s been 60 years since Charles made these recordings, yet there’s no dust on them. They still sound as lively and as mischievous, as ingenious and as innovative, as wild and as sophisticated as ever.

Q&A
David Ritz

In the late 1970s the Los Angeles-based writer David Ritz collaborated with Ray Charles on Brother Ray, which stands as one of the finest musical memoirs ever published. More than 50 books, countless essays and even a few songwriting credits later, Ritz penned the liner notes for The Atlantic Years and spoke to Uncut about his long relationship with the music

How did you discover Ray Charles?
I moved to Dallas around 1955 or 1956, and that’s when I discovered R’n’B. I had been living in New York. I knew a lot about jazz, but I didn’t know anything about R’n’B and I hadn’t yet discovered the blues. I was just a jazz snob. When you’re a kid and you love jazz, you view the music culture as very hierarchical. Jazz is on top, and everything else is underneath. Jazz is high art and pop music is low. But when I moved down to Texas, I discovered Ray. I heard him live in Dallas in the late 1950s, more or less at the time that these albums were being made, and it was one of the major events of my life. It opened up the heavens to me.

When did you start talking about writing a book together?
In 1975 or 1976 I was figuring out what to do with my life, and I just made up my mind that I was going to write Ray Charles’ biography. So I came out here to Los Angeles to talk him into working with me, which was a ridiculous thing to do. I had no qualifications and hadn’t written any books. Still, I was convinced that if I could only get in a room with him, I could show him how much I knew about his music. In the beginning I was turned away by the people in his office, who wanted nothing to do with me. So I called Western Union and asked if they could send telegrams in Braille. They said yes, so I began inundating his office with all these telegrams. I figured no-one in his office would be able to read them but him – which turned out to be true. They had to give him the telegrams. I was able to pitch him on the book, and he actually called me up! That was, improbably, my first book, and it opened up this whole world of becoming a ghostwriter.

What was it like working with him?
We worked together every day for a couple of years, and he became a major figure in my life. To be in his presence was extremely powerful. You get an idea of the urgency of his personality in his music, but when you’re actually in a room with him, he’s an extraordinary presence. He was so visceral and tactile. He would grab your arm and start to howl and laugh. When you said something he found amusing, he would fall to his knees and bang the floor. And he was very vulgar but in an artistic way. He loved cursing, and his cursing was like a John Coltrane solo.

Tell me about the period covered in this set. What does his Atlantic output represent in his career?
This is Ray at his height – when he’s young and hungry and full of fire and ambition. It’s a period that reminds me of Louis Armstrong when he had the Hot Five and the Hot Seven, when he was at the full flower of his creativity. Ray was in his twenties and he was on a major label, and even more importantly he had people at the label like Jerry Wexler who understood him and were perfectly happy to leave him alone to do whatever he wanted to do. Whether he was making singles for the pop market or jazz sides aimed at the adult crowd, he was given absolutely free rein to do whatever he wanted. He was able to sculpt his own sound and became a consummate artist. The old conflict between jazz and R’n’B is between high art and commerce, but it completely disappears when you put all these albums together.

You’ve been living with this music for nearly 60 years. How has it changed for you?
When I was writing these liner notes, I listened to all these albums again, And I think I enjoyed them even more than ever. When I was 13, I was excited but I had to catch up with him. He had had such a hardscrabble life and was able to express all that pain and joy and confusion and wonder. I loved it then, but I had to catch up. Now I’m an old man, and I’ve had children and grandchildren, I’ve had heartache and success and failure, all this shit that we go through in life, and I’m listening to these albums and I’m saying to myself, ‘This is sacred music.’ I felt like a parishioner at church. This music was speaking to my spirit, and my spirit at 72 is a whole lot different than it was when I was 13. I feel a deeper gratitude to Ray Charles than I ever did before, but it’s more than just being thankful to him for allowed me to write his book and start my career as a writer. It’s a gratitude that his songs continue to heal my hurt.
INTERVIEW: STEPHEN DEUSNER

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Pete Townshend’s solo albums set for reissue

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Pete Townshend‘s entire solo catalogue is being reissued next Friday (October 7).

The albums, including 1980’s Empty Glass, have been remastered and come on CD in digipak sleeves.

The Who‘s guitarist and songwriter has released seven solo albums in total, ranging from 1972’s Who Came First to 1993’s Psychoderelict. 1977’s Rough Mix, however, was a collaboration between the guitarist and the Small Faces and Faces’ bassist, guitarist, singer and songwriter Ronnie Lane.

1989’s The Iron Giant, meanwhile, was Townshend’s version of Ted Hughes’ popular children’s story, featuring Roger Daltrey and John Lee Hooker.

The tracklistings of the seven reissues are:

Who Came First (1972)

1. Pure And Easy
2. Evolution
3. Forever’s No Time At All
4. Let’s See Action
5. Time Is Passing
6. There’s A Heartache Following Me
7. Sheraton Gibson
8. Content
9. Parvardigar

Rough Mix (1977)

1. My Baby Gives It Away
2. Nowhere To Run
3. Rough Mix
4. Annie
5. Keep Me Turning
6. Catmelody
7. Misunderstood
8. April Fool
9. Street In The City
10. Heart To Hang Onto
11. Till The Rivers All Run Dry

Empty Glass (1980)

1. Rough Boys
2. I Am An Animal
3. And I Moved
4. Let My Love Open The Door
5. Jools And Jim
6. Keep On Working
7. Cat’s In The Cupboard
8. A Little Is Enough
9. Empty Glass
10. Gonna Get Ya

All The Best Cowboys Have Chinese Eyes (1982)

1. Stop Hurting People
2. The Sea Refuses No River
3. Prelude
4. Face Dances Part Two
5. Exquisitely Bored
6. Communication
7. Stardom In Acton
8. Uniforms (Corp d’esprit)
9. North Country Girl
10. Somebody Saved Me
11. Slit Skirts

White City (1985)

1. Give Blood
2. Brilliant Blues
3. Face the Face
4. Hiding Out
5. Secondhand Love
6. Crashing By Design
7. I Am Secure
8. White City Fighting
9. Come To Mama
The Iron Man (1989)

1. I Won’t Run Anymore
2. Over The Top
3. Man Machines
4. Dig
5. A Friend Is A Friend
6. I Eat Heavy Metal
7. All Shall Be Well
8. Was There Life
9. Fast Food
10. A Fool Says…
11. Fire
12. New Life / Reprise

PsychoDerelict (dialogue version) (1993)

1. English Boy
2. Meher Baba M3
3. Let’s Get pretentious
4. Meher Baba M4 (Signal Box)
5. Early Morning Dreams
6. I Want That Thing
7. Dialogue Intro (Outlive The Dinosaur)
8. Outlive The Dinosaur
9. Flame (demo version)
10. Now And Then
11. I Am Afraid
12. Don’t Try To Make Me Real
13. Dialogue Intro (Predictable)
14. Predictable
15. Flame
16. Meher Baba M5 (Vivaldi)
17. Fake It
18. Dialogue Intro (Now and Then – reprise)
19. Now and Then – reprise
20. Baba O’Riley (demo)
21. English Boy (reprise)

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Conor Oberst: “Bright Eyes still talk about doing another album”

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Bright Eyes have discussed making another album, singer and songwriter Conor Oberst reveals in the new issue of Uncut, dated November 2016 and out now.

The last album the group released was The People’s Key in 2011, yet Oberst says he’s not sure if it’ll be the final Bright Eyes record.

“I don’t know if it will be the last Bright Eyes album, we still talk about doing another record,” he explains.”Nate [Walcott] and Mike [Mogis] are both really busy doing their own stuff… We’ve always tried to do things we’re interested in at that moment. For fans of my music or Bright Eyes, I think that’s frustrating for a lot of them because we don’t really do that same thing twice too much.”

In the new issue of Uncut, Oberst looks back on the making of records by Bright Eyes, Desaparecidos, Monsters Of Folk and his own solo work.

“At the time, I wanted to make it like Death Of A Ladies’ Man, that Leonard Cohen album with Phil Spector,” Oberst says of Bright Eyes’ 2002 album Lifted, Or The Story Is In The Soil, Keep Your Ear To The Ground, “just over-the-top, huge production. We had all these weird ideas – all the in-between-song collages, all that stuff. We were really ambitious, but what I think is the charm is that we didn’t know what the fuck we were doing, it came off like a grade-school orchestra was playing it!”

The new Uncut, featuring the Specials, Bob Weir, Peter Hook, Shirley Collins, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Marc Almond and Nina Simone is out now.

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

 

Jean-Michel Jarre announces Oxygene 3

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Jean-Michel Jarre has announced the release of Oxygene 3.

The album is due on December 2.

“I don’t necessarily like anniversaries that much,” says Jarre. “But when I was recording Electronica, two years ago, I did a piece of music (today Oxygene 19) that made me think about what Oxygene could be if I was composing it today. Then I took the 40th anniversary of the first album as a deadline to push myself to see if I could compose this new chapter in six weeks, just like I did for the first one: probably to avoid thinking too much about, whether it was a good idea or not, and also to record everything in one go… The idea was not to copy the first album, but rather keeping the dogma of embarking listeners on a journey from beginning to end with different chapters, all linked to each other.

“What made the first Oxygene so different at the time, is probably the minimalist aspect, and the fact that there are almost no drums, and I wanted to keep this approach, creating the groove mainly with the sequences and the structure of the melodies only. When I did the first Oxygene in the vinyl days, I had a structure in mind divided in 2 parts fitting the A&B sides of an album. This time I enjoyed doing the same: one side being darker, the other being brighter. So when I think of it today, Oxygene 3 has actually two sides…

“I did the first Oxygene on an 8 tracks tape recorder with very few instruments, with no other choice than being minimalist. I tried to keep this minimalist approach for Oxygene 3. Some moments are built around one or two elements like in the first volume.”

Oxygene 3 will be available on CD, Vinyl and in the Ultimate Oxygene-Trilogy Box-Set, combining all three Oxygene-albums on CD and Vinyl, with an attached coffee-table-book featuring rare photos and notes on the story of Oxygene.

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Tim Buckley singles compilation announced

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Tim Buckley‘s singles are to be collected on a new album.

Wings: The Complete Singles 1966 – 1974 contains the A side and B side of all his UK and US singles, including the cancelled 1967 single “Once Upon a Time” b/w “Lady, Give Me Your Key”, the latter track making its first appearance anywhere.

The 21-song compilation is due out November 18 on Omnivore Recordings.

The track listing is:
Wings
Grief in My Soul
Aren’t You the Girl
Strange Street Affair Under Blue
Once Upon a Time

Lady, Give Me Your Key
Morning Glory
Knight-Errant

Once I Was

Pleasant Street
Carnival Song

Happy Time

So Lonely

Move With Me
Nighthawkin’
Quicksand

Stone in Love

Dolphins

Honey Man

Wanda Lu

Who Could Deny You

all tracks stereo, except 1–9 mono

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Robbie Robertson on his best albums, from The Band to Dylan

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In his 52-year career as songwriter, Band leader and, according to Bob Dylan, “mathematical guitar genius”, Robbie Robertson has played his part in the evolution of American music. Aged just 16, in 1959 he joined Ronnie Hawkins’ backing group. The Hawks later conspired with the newly electric Dylan, before becoming The Band, a polestar of US music. Since leaving The Band in ’76 Robertson has collaborated with Martin Scorsese and released five solo albums. At 67 he still embraces the mystery of creative exploration. “You don’t necessarily recognise these things as they’re happening,” he tells Uncut. “It’s always a discovery process.” Interview: Graeme Thomson. Originally published in Uncut’s April 2011 issue (Take 167).

____________________________

 

BOB DYLAN
The Bootleg Series Vol 4: Bob Dylan Live, 1966, The ‘Royal Albert Hall’ Concert
(Columbia, 1998)
The most famous live bootleg in rock history was finally released in 1998, and captures Dylan & The Hawks in their ragged pomp at Manchester Free Trade Hall in ’66. Their music enrages folk purists, one of whom famously cries “Judas!” at Dylan…

ROBERTSON: Oh, I remember the “Judas” night, but we’d heard it all before. We’d toured the US, Canada, Australia, then all over Europe, so by the time we got to England we were hardened veterans of negativity. It was an interesting experience, to go all over the world and have thousands of people turn up to boo you – they’d throw stuff, too. I learned to play guitar without looking at my hands, because I had to watch out for flying objects. An extraordinary experiment in terror. At some point you think, ‘God, it’s only music.’ That night in Manchester we knew we were in the zone and we did something beautiful. After the show we’d listen on a little mono Nagra tape recorder and we’d say, “That’s not that bad!” We just had to barrel through, but there were times when you woke up screaming, “Maybe I’m wrong!” We’d pick up a newspaper and it would talk about how terrible the show was. We were in the middle of a musical revolution, and it was very challenging to believe in something when no-one else did.

Reviewed! Oasis, Supersonic – the documentary

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In Will Carruthers’ excellent memoir of his time with Spacemen 3 and Spiritualized, Playing The Bass With Three Left Hands, he recalls a fallow period working as a manual labourer where one job involved digging trenches for electric cables at Oasis’ Knebworth concerts. “Somewhere in the distance,” he writes, “I saw two white golf carts with people in them. It was the stars of the show… they drove round and round and laughed. Their joy seemed neither convincing nor entirely convinced, or maybe I was just jealous.”

The Knebworth shows in August 1996, where the band played to a total of 250,000 people, bookend Mat Whitecross’ documentary – tacitly suggesting that essentially it was all down hill from here for the remaining 13 years of Oasis’ career. Whitecross’ focus on the 2 ½ years leading it up to Knebworth allows Noel Gallagher to frame Oasis’ rise in terms that are both heroic and hackneyed: “We were grafters who came from nothing and took it all.”

Both Noel and Liam are on hand to provide voiceovers, accompanied by a close inner-circle including former bandmates Bonehead and Guigsy, label boss Alan McGee, manager Marcus Russell and Peggy Gallagher. Over footage, these voices helpfully take us from Inspiral Carpets tours in the late 80s to basement rehearsal rooms and onwards. It is a well-documented story, and the familiar narrative beats are all present and correct from McGee’s live epiphany at Glasgow’s King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut to the band being thrown off a ferry to Amsterdam, Noel’s sudden depature mid-American tour, oh, and Noel and Liam – they just don’t get on, right?

Whitecross’ problems aren’t just limited to the familiarity of the tale – much of it blasted onto the front pages of the tabloids at the time. Unlike Supersonic’s obvious antecedent Amy – members of whose creative team are producers here – Supersonic lacks much intimacy or insight. The lesser-told testimonials of childhood friends Juliette Ashby and Lauren Gilbert gave Winehouse’s story a freshness and immediacy. The arrival of the iPhone in the early Oughts, conveniently coinciding with her rising fame, was a boon for that film’s director Asif Kapadia. Whitecross only has shaky camcorder footage from the Manchester Boardwalk or the back of a tour bus; he must make do, then, with less satisfying, impersonal TV and concert film.

That said, a viewer looking to experience the ‘full Liam’, for instance, will be amply rewarded by scenes best described as “a big bunch of chaos”, much of it involving his brother. “Noel has a lot of buttons, Liam has a lot of fingers,” says Bonehead sagely. Often their sibling squabbling is just very, very funny; over distance, it begins to wear. A young Liam’s early revelation that all he wants to do is make enough money to buy Peggy a new home is surprisingly sweet. But perhaps the most revealing moment comes when the brothers find themselves in an Irish bar along with their estranged father, Tommy, who had been paid to contact the boys by a British tabloid. Liam is all for settling a few scores with his fists, but Noel talks him out of it. What Noel said to calm down his angry, impetuous younger brother has been lost to history, but Whitecross finally finds an opportunity to interrogate their sibling dynamic. It’s a shame there isn’t more of it.

Follow me on Twitter @MichaelBonner

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Shovels & Rope – Little Seeds

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Michael Trent and Cary Ann Hearst have made their reputation as a duo with keen ears for characters and places, their songs essentially serving as clever narratives on which to hang variants of blues, folk and country clatter. 2013’s “Birmingham” was a case in point (and an Americana Award winner), a rucking number about life on the road, protagonists Rockamount Cowboy and Nickajack Man burning rubber between Tennessee and the Carolinas.

Their career has moved on apace since follow-up Swimmin’ Time grazed the US Top 20, a documentary about the couple appeared in 2014 and last November saw them release a set of collaborations with pals such as Shakey Graves and The Milk Carton Kids.

Little Seeds isn’t a radical departure from past endeavours, though it is a more expansive work and, more interestingly, a more personal one. Many of these tunes were a direct result of events close to home. Perhaps none more so than “BWYR”, a spectral, harmony-driven plea for unity in divisive times, a response to the church shooting that claimed nine lives in their adopted Charleston last summer. The death of a friend forms the basis of “This Ride”, while two compositions deal with the Alzheimer’s diagnosis of Trent’s father, a dual portrayal of stoicism and dignity fragmented by memories that refuse to knit together.

All this might suggest an overly sombre listening experience, but Little Seeds is actually nothing of the sort. These songs are often vividly effervescent. “I Know” is a playful tale of petty jealousies and band rivalries that sounds like a dust-up between T. Rex and Gun Club. “Buffalo Nickel” examines the nature of Trent and Hearst’s marital relationship, its distorted howl and primitive thump adding a further dimension to the similarities to The White Stripes. And the recent arrival of the couple’s first child also plays into the album’s more spirited passages. It is, in fact, a portrait of life’s triumphs and travails, its joys and sorrows rendered in wholly compelling detail.

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Kate Bush to release triple live album, Before The Dawn

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Kate Bush is releasing a live album, Before The Dawn, chronicling her late 2014 performances at London‘s Hammersmith Apollo.

Released under the name The KT Fellowship, the triple-album is set to come out on November 25.

Before The Dawn will reportedly follow the structure of Bush’s live shows, featuring seven hits, including “King Of The Mountain” and “Hounds Of Love”, a performance of Side Two of Hounds Of Love, entitled ‘The Ninth Wave’, and then a suite from Bush’s 2005 album Aerial.

The disc will also include the previously unreleased song, “Tawny Owl”, sung by the singer’s son, Albert McIntosh, as well as a performance of “Never Be Mine”, most likely recorded at a rehearsal.

Bush’s last studio album was 50 Words For Snow, released in 2011.

Read Uncut’s review of the Before The Dawn live show.

The CD and LP tracklistings of Before The Dawn are:

Disc One – Act One
Lily
Hounds Of Love
Joanni
Top Of The City
Never Be Mine
Running Up That Hill
King Of The Mountain

Disc Two – Act Two
Astronomer’s Call
And Dream Of Sheep
Under Ice
Waking The Witch
Watching Them Without Her
Watching You Without Me
Little Light
Jig Of Life
Hello Earth
The Morning Fog

Disc Three – Act Three
Prelude
Prologue
An Architect’s Dream
The Painter’s Link
Sunset
Aerial Tal
Somewhere In Between
Tawny Moon
Nocturn
Aerial
Among Angels
Cloudbusting

_________________

Side One
Lily
Hounds Of Love
Joanni
Top Of The City

Side Two
Never Be Mine
Running Up That Hill
King Of The Mountain

Side Three
Astronomer’s Call
And Dream Of Sheep
Under Ice
Waking The Witch
Watching Them Without Her
Watching You Without Me

Side Four
Little Light
Jig Of Life
Hello Earth
The Morning Fog

Side Five
Prelude
Prologue
An Architect’s Dream
The Painter’s Link

Side Six
Sunset
Aerial Tal
Somewhere In Between
Tawny Moon

Side Seven
Nocturn
Aerial

Side Eight
Among Angels
Cloudbusting

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

 

Win an exclusive signed Sting print!

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This Friday – September 30 – sees the release of Sting‘s new boxset, The Studio Collection.

The box features eight of Sting’s solo albums, spread across 11 LPs, from 1985’s The Dream Of The Blue Turtles, to 2013’s The Last Ship.

To mark this momentous release, we’ve got two exclusive prints signed by Sting to give away.

To be in with a chance of winning one of them, just answer this question correctly:

What is the opening track on The Dream Of The Blue Turtles?

Send your answer along with your name and address to UncutComp@timeinc.com by noon, Monday, October 10, 2016.

Two winners will be chosen from the correct entries and notified by email. The editor’s decision is final.

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

David Gilmour joined by Benedict Cumberbatch onstage in London

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David Gilmour was joined by Benedict Cumberbatch onstage at London‘s Royal Albert Hall last night (September 28).

The Sherlock star took to the stage to perform the final song of the night, a version of “Comfortably Numb”, originally featured on Pink Floyd‘s 1979 album The Wall, after being personally invited by Gilmour.

The two were introduced by mutual friends, with Cumberbatch stepping into the shoes of David Bowie, who performed the song with the guitarist at the Royal Albert Hall in 2006. It was Bowie’s final stage appearance.

David Gilmour is set to play the Royal Albert Hall tonight (September 29) and tomorrow (30).

Last night, Gilmour played:

5 A.M.
Rattle That Lock
Faces Of Stone
What Do You Want From Me
The Blue
The Great Gig In The Sky
A Boat Lies Waiting
Wish You Were Here
Money
In Any Tongue
High Hopes
One Of These Days
Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Parts I-V)
Fat Old Sun
Coming Back To Life
On An Island
Us And Them
Today
Sorrow
Run Like Hell
Time
Breathe (Reprise)
Comfortably Numb

 

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

 

The 33rd Uncut Playlist Of 2016

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A few things to flag up, as ever, not least the Padang Food Tigers/ Sigbjørn Apeland and Botany albums which get better and better, I think, the more I play them. The first has a kind of porch improv vibe that maybe recalls Duane Pitre’s rustic drone, the electro-acoustic duo of Mountains, and the mellower moments of Pelt, though Apeland is a harmonium player, so there’s a raga texture in there, too. Botany, meanwhile, creates billowing psychedelic constructs while using the cut-and-paste methodology of an old-school hip hop producer. Think a late entry into Eno’s Ambient series from DJ Shadow? Kin to Floating Points, too.

Feral Ohms, by the way, is Ethan Miller (Heron Oblivion, Howlin Rain etc) reconnecting with the full-force blastitude of Comets On Fire. Rest assured, I’ll post a track when one enters public domain…

Follow me on Twitter @JohnRMulvey

1 Lambchop – FLOTUS (City Slang/Merge)

2 NxWorries (Anderson Paak & Knxwledge) – Yes Lawd! (Stones Throw)

3 James Johnston – The Starless Room (Clouds Hill)

4 Light Fantastic – Out Of View (Spiritual Pajamas)

5 Orchestre Poly-Rythmo De Cotonou – Madjafalao (Because Music)

6 Padang Food Tigers & Sigbjørn Apeland – Bumblin’ Creed (Northern Spy)

7 Botany – Deepak Verbera (Western Vinyl)

8 Norah Jones – Day Breaks (Blue Note)

9 Steve Hauschildt – Strands (Thrill Jockey)

10 Pony Hunt – Heart Creek (Hearth Music)

11 75 Dollar Bill – Wood/Metal/Plastic/Pattern/Rhythm/Rock (Thin Wrist)

12 Discharge – Hear Nothing See Nothing Say Nothing (Clay)

13 The Olympians – The Olympians (Other Hand/Daptone)

14 Feral Ohms – Live In San Francisco (Castle Face)

15 Danny Brown – Atrocity Exhibition (Warp)

16 Lambchop – Mr M (City Slang)

17 Various Artists – Let It Be: Black America Sings Lennon, McCartney And Harrison (Ace)

18 Sammus – Weirdo (Feat Homeboy Sandman) (Don Giovanni)

19 Tim Hecker – Love Streams (4AD)

20 Julius Eastman – Femenine (Frozen Reeds)

The Band announce 40th anniversary edition of The Last Waltz

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The Band celebrate the 40th anniversary of The Last Waltz with four new editions.

Available on November 11 from Rhino, these will pair the audio and video for the first time. Meanwhile, a 40th Anniversary Collector’s Edition, limited to 2,500 copies worldwide, which includes a replica of Martin Scorsese‘s original shooting script for the film. The Collector’s Edition also includes a foreword by Scorsese and an essay from screenwriter Mardik Martin.

40th Anniversary Edition – Original soundtrack with newly remastered audio from the original master tapes on two CDs.

40th Anniversary Deluxe Edition – Complete audio from the concert, including rehearsals and outtakes, plus The Last Waltz film on Blu-Ray.

40th Anniversary Deluxe Edition Vinyl – Complete audio from the concert, including rehearsals and outtakes, pressed on 180-gram vinyl for the first time and presented in an ornate lift-top box.

40th Anniversary Collector’s Edition – Limited to 2,500 copies, this version includes:
* Complete audio from the concert.
* The Last Waltz film on Blu-ray.
*Second Blu-Ray disc including a rarely seen interview from the 1990s with Martin Scorsese and Robbie Robertson, photo gallery, and 5.1 audio mix of the original album.
* 300-page book, bound in red faux-leather with a full replication of Scorsese’s shooting script, rare and previously unseen photos, set sketches, three foldout storyboards, and a foreword by Scorsese.

40th Anniversary Collector’s Edition track listing is:

Disc One
“Theme From The Last Waltz” – with orchestra
“Up On Cripple Creek”
“The Shape I’m In”
“It Makes No Difference”
“Who Do You Love” – with Ronnie Hawkins
“Life Is A Carnival”
“Such A Night” – with Dr. John
“The Weight”
“Down South In New Orleans” – with Bobby Charles
“This Wheel’s On Fire”
“Mystery Train” – with Paul Butterfield
“Caldonia” – with Muddy Waters
“Mannish Boy” – with Muddy Waters
“Stagefright”

Disc Two
“Rag Mama Rag”
“All Our Past Times” – with Eric Clapton
“Further On Up The Road” – with Eric Clapton
“Ophelia”
“Helpless” – with Neil Young
“Four Strong Winds” – with Neil Young
“Coyote” – with Joni Mitchell
“Shadows And Light” – with Joni Mitchell
“Furry Sings The Blues” – with Joni Mitchell
“Acadian Driftwood”
“Dry Your Eyes” – with Neil Diamond
“The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show”
“Tura Lura Lura (That’s An Irish Lullaby)” – with Van Morrison
“Caravan” – with Van Morrison

Disc Three
“The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down”
“The Genetic Method/Chest Fever”
“Baby Let Me Follow You Down” – with Bob Dylan
“Hazel” – with Bob Dylan
“I Don’t Believe You (She Acts Live We Never Have Met)” – with Bob Dylan
“Forever Young” – with Bob Dylan
“Baby Let Me Follow You Down” (Reprise) – with Bob Dylan
“I Shall Be Released”
Jam #1
Jam #2
“Don’t Do It”
“Greensleeves” (From Movie Soundtrack)

Disc Four
“The Last Waltz Suite”
“The Well”
“Evangeline” – with Emmylou Harris
“Out Of The Blue”
“The Weight” – with The Staples
“The Last Waltz Refrain”
Concert Rehearsal
“King Harvest (Has Surely Come)”
“Tura Lura Lura (That’s An Irish Lullaby)”
“Caravan”
“Such A Night”
“Rag Mama Rag”
“Mad Waltz” – Sketch track for “The Well”
“The Last Waltz” – Instrumental
“The Last Waltz – Sketch

Disc Five: Blu Ray
Track Listing (5.1 Surround Sound Mix)
“Theme From The Last Waltz” – with orchestra
“Up On Cripple Creek”
“The Shape I’m In”
“It Makes No Difference”
“Who Do You Love” – with Ronnie Hawkins
“Life Is A Carnival”
“Such A Night” – with Dr. John
“Down South In New Orleans” – with Bobby Charles
“Mystery Train” – with Paul Butterfield
“Mannish Boy” – with Muddy Waters
“Stagefright”
“Further On Up The Road” – with Eric Clapton
“Ophelia”
“Helpless” – with Neil Young
“Coyote” – with Joni Mitchell
“Dry Your Eyes” – with Neil Diamond
“Tura Lura Lura (That’s An Irish Lullaby)” – with Van Morrison
“Caravan” – with Van Morrison
“The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down”
“Baby Let Me Follow You Down” – with Bob Dylan
“I Don’t Believe You (She Acts Live We Never Have Met)” – with Bob Dylan
“Forever Young” – with Bob Dylan
“Baby Let Me Follow You Down” (Reprise)
“I Shall Be Released” – Finale
“The Well”
“Evangeline” – with Emmylou Harris
“Out Of The Blue”
“The Weight” – with The Staples
“The Last Waltz Refrain”
“Theme From The Last Waltz”

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Watch John Cooper Clarke and Hugh Cornwell discuss their new album, This Time It’s Personal

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John Cooper Clarke and Hugh Cornwell have collaborated on an album, This Time It’s Personal, which is released on October 14 by Sony Music.

The album features vocals by Clarke and guitars by Cornwell.

The duo have also announced a run of shows during November and December to support the album’s release.

You can watch them talk about the album in the film below.

The This Time It’s Personal tracklisting is:

It’s Only Make Believe
Way Down Yonder In New Orleans
Spanish Harlem
Johnny Remember Me
MacArthur Park
She’s A Woman
Donna
Jezebel
Love Potion Number 9
Sweeter Than You

Tour dates:

Fri 25 November – Norwich Waterfront
Sat 26 November – Cambridge Junction
Tue 29 November – London O2 Forum Kentish Town
Wed 30 November – Bristol O2 Academy
Thu 01 December – Birmingham O2 Institute
Sat 03 December – Manchester O2 Ritz
Thu 08 December – Sheffield Leadmill
Fri 09 December – Glasgow O2 ABC

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Wilco – Schmilco

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Don’t be fooled by its lighthearted, Nilsson Schmilsson-referencing title – Schmilco is as considered and introspective as the band’s 2015 surprise release Star Wars was spontaneous and exuberant. Stripped back yet unnervingly intense, not unlike Neil Young’s bleak masterpiece On The Beach, Wilco’s tenth studio album is striking for the challenges Jeff Tweedy and his partners have set for themselves as they engage in a tug of war between order and chaos, acceptance and despair.

The folky strummed acoustic on which most of Schmilco’s dozen tracks are built hearkens back to Wilco’s first album, 1994’s A.M.; released at a time when Tweedy was viewed merely as Uncle Tupelo’s second banana, having reacted to Jay Farrar’s abrupt exit by gamely picking up the pieces and making the most of what then seemed like a shot in the dark. Since that modest, engaging and unexpectedly surefooted first step, Farrar’s one-time sidekick and his shifting lineup have accumulated one of the richest, most diverse and ambitious bodies of work of any American band of the last quarter-century. Despite his stature, Tweedy, whose humanity and lack of pretension were at the root of Wilco’s initial appeal, retains his underdog appeal 22 years and 10 albums down the road. The antithesis of a larger-than-life rock star, less enigmatically distant than the similarly adored auteur Thom Yorke, he’s always come off as a friend and confidant, if a troubled one at times, a guy we reflexively root for. Tweedy is unafraid to be unflinchingly honest, but he’s never seemed more vulnerable than he does on this nerve-jangling album.

In the pre-release literature, Tweedy describes the album as “joyously negative… I just had a lot of fun being sour about the things that upset me.” Resourceful as ever, he’s come up with an artfully twisted way to vent his spleen – and more to the point, to expose the depths of his anguish. Time feels suspended within the record’s arid, claustrophobic atmosphere; the running time is less than 37 minutes, only one track breaks four minutes and most are under three, but you can get lost – or trapped – inside it, as in a dream that refuses to release you from its jittery thrall. Tweedy and his cohorts have boiled down each song and instrumental part to its essence – in its starkness, the sound evokes bone and gristle, to the degree that the record’s moments of fleshed-out human warmth are magnified, mirroring the jangled nerves that rattle the frontman’s rumpled, perennially boyish tenor.

In the opening “Normal American Kids”, Tweedy looks back to his youth, but not nostalgically – far from it. The lyric describes feeling apart and unsettled by the existential distance from perceived normalcy, while Nels Cline’s slide wheezes asthmatically, seconding the emotion. “Always hated those normal American kids”, he ruefully concludes. The vibe warms considerably, if temporarily, on the following “If I Ever Was A Child”, with its loping cadence, gilded guitars and textured chorus harmonies, recalling the Byrdsy folk rock of 2007’s lovely Sky Blue Sky. Glenn Kotche’s feverish double-time drumming propels “Cry All Day” while bass player John Stirratt, whose stolid parts counterbalance his bandmates’ extremes, puts his oars in the water to pull against the unchecked energy, suggesting the uneasy duality of agitation and reflectiveness that give the album its distinct character. The band courts anarchy on “Common Sense”, with its fractured stop/start cadence, dissonant guitar chords, queasy slide and what could pass for the zither in “The Third Man Theme” refracted through a bad acid trip. There’s a stretch of spirited acoustic rock’n’roll in the acrimonious “Nope” and the chugging “Something To Lose”, followed by the misanthropic lament “Happiness” (“…depends on who you blame”) and the bonsai short story “Quarters”, before things go haywire again with “Locator”. On this eerie, disjointed track, the underlying mortal dread breaks the surface, as the narrator peers into the abyss, mesmerised, chanting “I hide/Here below”.

Whenever we begin to get comfortable on this record, Tweedy and his cohorts pull the rug out from under us. In the past, they’ve kept us on edge by deftly employing eruptive tonal shifts, the operative modes of Being There and Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, as well as more recent cacophonous disturbances triggered by Cline’s trademark freak-outs like Wilco (The Album)’s “Bull Black Nova” and The Whole Love’s “Art Of Almost”. On Schmilco, by contrast, the approach is sustained and reductive, leading to an emptying out, a detox of the psyche; which is why experiencing the whole of it – culminating with the unsettlingly beautiful “Shrug And Destroy” (the album’s “Norwegian Wood”), the spoken/sung, Velvets-referencing “We Aren’t The World (Safety Girl)” and the blessedly liquid closer “Just Say Goodbye” – ultimately brings such a sense of relief. Without question, Schmilco is Wilco’s quietest, most disquieting album. And if Tweedy’s soul-baring amid these artfully austere backdrops constitutes a performance, it’s a pretty convincing one.

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

New David Bowie singles compilation announced

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A new compilation of David Bowie‘s singles will be released on November 11.

LEGACY BOWIE collects together Bowie’s singles from 1969’s “Space Oddity” through to the final singles “Lazarus” and “I Can’t Give Everything Away” from earlier this year.

All formats of BOWIE LEGACY feature a previously unreleased version of the classic 1971 single “Life On Mars?” mixed by original producer Ken Scott.

A vinyl set will be released on January 7, 2017.

Standard CD tracklisting
Let’s Dance (single version)
Ashes To Ashes (single version)
Under Pressure – Queen & David Bowie
Life On Mars? (2016 mix)
Changes
Oh! You Pretty Things
The Man Who Sold The World
Space Oddity
Starman (original single mix)
Ziggy Stardust
The Jean Genie (original single mix)
Rebel Rebel
Golden Years (single version)
Dancing In The Street – David Bowie & Mick Jagger
China Girl (single version)
Fame
Sound And Vision
‘Heroes’ (single version)
Where Are We Now?
Lazarus (radio edit)

Deluxe CD tracklisting
CD1
Space Oddity
The Man Who Sold The World
Changes
Oh! You Pretty Things
Life On Mars? (2016 mix)
Starman (original single mix)
Ziggy Stardust
Moonage Daydream
The Jean Genie (original single mix
All The Young Dudes
Drive-In Saturday
Sorrow
Rebel Rebel
Young Americans (original single edit)
Fame
Golden Years (single version)
Sound And Vision
‘Heroes’ (single version)
Boys Keep Swinging
Ashes To Ashes (single version)
Fashion (single version)

CD 2
Under Pressure – Queen & David Bowie
Let’s Dance (single version)
China Girl (single version)
Modern Love (single version)
Blue Jean
This Is Not America – with The Pat Metheny Group
Dancing In The Street – David Bowie & Mick Jagger
Absolute Beginners (edit)
Jump They Say (radio edit)
Hallo Spaceboy (PSB Remix) – with The Pet Shop Boys
Little Wonder (edit)
I’m Afraid Of Americans (V1 edit)
Thursday’s Child (radio edit)
Slow Burn (radio edit)
Everyone Says ‘Hi’ (edit)
New Killer Star (radio edit)
Where Are We Now?
Lazarus (radio edit)
I Cant Give Everything Away (radio edit)

BOWIE LEGACY 2 LP tracklisting
Side 1
Let’s Dance (single version)
Ashes To Ashes (single version)
Under Pressure – Queen & David Bowie
Life On Mars? (2016 mix)
Changes

Side 2
Oh! You Pretty Things
The Man Who Sold The World
Space Oddity
Starman (original single mix)
Ziggy Stardust

Side 3
The Jean Genie (original single mix)
Rebel Rebel
Golden Years (single version)
Dancing In The Street – David Bowie & Mick Jagger
China Girl (single version)

Side 4
Fame
Sound And Vision
‘Heroes’ (single version)
Where Are We Now?
Lazarus (radio edit)

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD