American Honey

0

The breakthrough film for British director Andrea Arnold was Wasp, an Oscar-winning short about a single mother struggling with her four children in a dull dormitory suburb.

Arnold’s latest film, American Honey, follows another teenager whose life is at a dead end – Star (Saska Lane) – who anticipates freedom and excitement when she joins a crew of college-age kids travelling across America selling magazine subscriptions. “We do more than work,” Star is told. “We explore America, we party!”

Their foreman is the charismatic Jake (Shia LaBoeuf), and Star is immediately drawn to him. For the next three hours, Arnold follows her gang of hard partying hustlers as they freewheel their way round motels and car parks in the Midwest.

The film’s first hour is the most cohesive – at times, American Honey resembles social documentary, as the Dartford-born Arnold lets her camera linger on stray dogs pawing the ground outside a motel on the outskirts of Kansas City, or frames middle-aged, overweight couples line dancing in Oklahoma.

Despite a spirited performance from Lane as Star – whose outward defiance masks a deep-rooted vulnerability – there is little to anchor the film. Conflict between Star and Jake’s tough-as-nails white trash boss Krystal (Riley Keough; Elvis Presley’s granddaughter) is strung along. The cycle of travelling, selling and partying becomes repetitive It is best, perhaps, to enjoy the dynamic cinematography by Robbie Ryan, who brings colours to life with burning intensity; his night scenes, particularly, find Arnold’s feral brood whooping it up round ad hoc bonfires, wild things caught in silvery moonlit tones.

Follow me on Twitter @MichaelBonner

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Ask Ryley Walker!

0

Golden Sings That Have Been Sung is one of our favourite albums of the year; as a consequence, Ryley Walker will be answering your questions as part of our regular An Audience With… feature.

So is there anything you’d like us to ask the singer-songwriter?

What are his memories of growing up in Rockfield, Illinois?
What’s the worst job he’s ever taken to support himself?
After his collaborative records with Bill Mackay and Charles Rumback, who else would be like to record with?

Send up your questions by noon, Tuesday, November 1 to uncutaudiencewith@timeinc.com.

The best questions, and Ryley’s answers, will be published in a future edition of Uncut magazine.

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Working with Bob Dylan: “I had to sort the human from the myth”

0

Following the momentous news of Bob Dylan’s Nobel Prize for Literature, here’s the second installment of two part feature exploring Dylan’s weirdest and most controversial decade: the Eighties. This originally appeared in Uncut Take 207 from August 2014.

You can read Part One by clicking here.

__________

What Good Am I?

The years of turmoil. In the second part of our Dylan In The ’80s epic, we re-evaluate Bob Dylan’s most confounding decade. From the travesty of Live Aid, via hook-ups with the Grateful Dead, the Heartbreakers and the Traveling Wilburys, to the start of the Never Ending Tour, we enlist some of Dylan’s key collaborators to uncover the riches hidden in an oft-vilified body of work. “I literally had to sort the human from the myth,” says one associate – and so, perhaps, did Dylan.

‘‘Some artists’ work speaks for itself. Some artists’ work speaks for a generation. It’s my deep personal pleasure to present for you one of America’s great voices of freedom. It can only be one man. The transcendent Bob Dylan…”

June 13, 1985. Live Aid is in its umpteenth conscience-stricken hour when Jack Nicholson excitedly introduces Dylan as the closing act at Philadelphia’s RFK Stadium, where he appears with Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood, looking flabby and distressed. In the opinion of the millions who witness it, he delivers a performance of shocking ineptitude, made worse when he dares mention the fact that people are starving in America as well as Ethiopia and maybe some of the money being raised by Live Aid could, you know, be used to pay off the debt of American farmers to US banks. This apparently gormless insensitivity confirms him in the eyes of most of the watching world as a raddled old twerp whose grasp of reality has fatally loosened. But some people are listening to what he has to say. Within two months, Farm Aid is underway at the University Of Illinois, organised by Willie Nelson with the support of Neil Young. Dylan appears with Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers as his band, and if they’d been playing under a roof, they would have blown it off.

It’s the start of a two-year touring alliance with the Heartbreakers, the True Confessions tour opening in Australasia in February 1986. There are US dates scheduled for June and July, and Columbia prompt Dylan for a new album to coincide with them. Dylan duly obliges with his sixth studio album in seven years. Knocked Out Loaded is assembled – haphazardly, even desperately, in subsequent opinion – from sessions going back as far as November 1984 at Cherokee Studios in LA, where many of the basic tracks that Arthur Baker turns into Empire Burlesque are recorded.

Empire Burlesque and Knocked Out Loaded are essentially one album,” says guitarist Ira Ingber, younger brother of Elliot Ingber, who was in the original Mothers Of Invention but is perhaps better known as Winged Eel Fingerling in Captain Beefheart’s Magic Band. Ira, a veteran of the LA music scene who’s played with JD Souther, Jennifer Warnes and Van Dyke Parks, gets a call in late 1984 from an old schoolfriend, Gary Shafner, who’s now working for Dylan. According to Shafner, Dylan’s putting a band together for an unspecified project, perhaps a new album. Would Ira be interested in being part of whatever might happen next?

22-infidels

“They had just done Infidels,” Ingber tells Uncut, “and Bob was back pretty much living at his place in Malibu. There was some new-found interest to go in another direction, but it wasn’t clear what it was.” Ingber is duly summoned to Dylan’s Point Dume compound in Malibu.

“Bob was an idol, just huge. The first thing I had to do was get over my schoolgirl crush. We talked for a minute or two, then he pulled out three or four pages of typewritten song lists, and he said, ‘D’you know any of these?’ I said, ‘…yeah.’ So we started playing. He’s playing acoustic, I’m playing acoustic, and one voice in my head is saying, ‘I’m playing “It’s All Over Now Baby Blue” with Bob Dylan. Right now.’ And the other part of my head is saying, ‘You’re playing with Bob Dylan but don’t think about it.’ I had to sort the human from the myth. But it worked out fine. We got on, and then we started talking about a band.”

Ingber calls some friends: Vince Melamed, a keyboard player he’s worked with in JD Souther’s band, bass player Carl Sealove and drummer Charlie Quintana, who is eventually replaced by Don Heffington from Lone Justice. “This core group came together in late 1984,” Ingber goes on. “The three of us went up to Bob’s house, on a daily basis for some weeks. There were a number of houses on the property and this one was empty, except for a bunch of equipment he had in there. We would play some of his old stuff, or he’d bring a tape, or he’d start playing a song and we wouldn’t know what it was – sometimes an old classic, sometimes even a demo that someone had sent him. Not all of it was his material, which I thought was interesting. He came to me one day and he told me he wanted to learn to play Ray Charles’ ‘Come Rain Or Come Shine’ on guitar. Because it’s arranged for an orchestra, not a guitar, there are some very complex chords. ‘I said, “Wouldn’t it be easier if we just did it and you could sing it and not bother playing?” He was insistent – so I did an arrangement and I don’t even know if we got as far as trying to play it, because the chords involved were a little beyond his comfort level on the guitar, so the whole thing kind of went away. But the scope of this work we were doing up in Malibu was very far ranging, that’s the best way I can describe it.

“Dylan taped everything on this boom box he had. It was funny, there was a PA set up in this house we were rehearsing in. But he’d never sing into the PA. He would sing either into one of our ears – like, stand next to me, and sing straight into my ear – or he’d sing into the boom box. I kept saying, ‘You know, if you sang into the mic, it might sound…’ And he’d be, ‘No. No. I donwanna do that.’”

23-empire-burlesque

After several weeks of rehearsals, the band is assembled at Cherokee Studios in Hollywood, where among the tracks recorded is “New Danville Girl”, which Dylan re-writes and re-records subsequently as “Brownsville Girl”. Sessions continue at Cherokee through November, before Dylan completes what has become Empire Burlesque in New York, with Arthur Baker producing. When the album comes out, Ingber is not impressed by what he hears.

“I was disappointed based on what I had heard at the original recordings,” he says. “Charitably, I think Empire Burlesque and to a lesser degree Knocked Out Loaded were victims of what I call ‘’80s-itis’. Both those albums had some really wonderful performances, but the production obscured a lot of it, because back then the overuse of things like digital reverb was really prevalent. The records suffered because of it – I suspect that if somebody went back into the master tapes and had another look, I bet that these would be amazing recordings.”

Inside Bob Dylan’s 80s: “He was an agent provocateur; he had a saboteur in him.”

0

Following the momentous news of Bob Dylan’s Nobel Prize for Literature, here’s the first installment of two part feature exploring Dylan’s weirdest and most controversial decade: the Eighties. This originally appeared in Uncut Take 206 from July 2014.

You can read Part Two by clicking here.

__________

Saved?

As the 1970s draw to a close, BOB DYLAN is embarking on the weirdest and most controversial phase of his storied career. He has embraced Christianity with apocalyptic fervour. His fans, though, are less faithful: “Jesus loves your old songs, too,” notes one infidel. In the first part of a major new survey, Uncut and many of his old collaborators reconsider Dylan’s 1980s, and discover a neglected treasure trove of music. “People felt that Bob disappeared into a kind of black hole. Whereas Bob would say, ‘No: that’s a hole full of light…’”

October 14, 1987. A couple of nights later, a hurricane roars through the south of England, but it’s nothing compared to the inclemency that attaches itself to Bob Dylan’s appearance this evening at London’s Wembley Arena. Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers are already lined up onstage, waiting for him, when Bob blows out of the wings like something scary out of Revelation, that book of wrath and apocalypse, a wicked messenger, fire in his eyes and blood coming to the boil. He’s wearing a bandana around his head, Apache-style, a grubby silk shirt tied in a knot at his waist, weather-beaten leather trousers and jacket, biker boots and fingerless motorcycle gloves.

His arachnid scurry brings him quickly to a microphone, already singing the opening lines of “Like A Rolling Stone”. Petty and The Heartbreakers, perhaps not expecting this as the show’s opening number, jump to attention like dozing sentries startled by gunfire. There’s an all-hands-on-deck bustle about them as they manfully respond to what looks like being caught on the hop – and not for the first time, you imagine, on a two-year tour of duty with Dylan that most nights have found them on a knife edge, no predicting where from moment to moment Bob’s legendary whim will take them.

That night at Wembley Arena in October 1987, one of the last dates of the aptly named Temples In Flames tour, storm clouds already massing somewhere and a great wind beginning to stir, Dylan’s 15-song setlist is a generous career-span that includes alongside more recent songs from largely unpopular albums crowd favourites “Maggie’s Farm”, “Forever Young”, “I’ll Be Your Baby Tonight”, “I Want You”, “The Ballad Of Frankie Lee And Judas Priest”, “Don’t Think Twice, It’s Alright” and “Chimes Of Freedom”. These aren’t, however, songs that Dylan revisits happily and few of them bear an exact resemblance to what they sounded like when the audience first heard them.

The sound that comes to me now when I think of the show is a garage band howl, abrasive, unruly and loud. It’s at times cacophonous and ragged enough to make large sections of the audience feel witness to a kind of desecration, Dylan vandalising his own past in what seems as the show goes on increasingly like a conscious attempt to reconnect with songs that by his own later admission had lost all meaning for him by first dismantling them. By the time the set ends with a delirious version of “Shot Of Love” that at one point begins to resemble the calamitous rumble of “Gimme Shelter”, and the nightmarish two-chord shriek of “In The Garden”, the audience is for the most part palpably aghast.

There’s a rippling disgruntlement in the seats around me where many venerable Dylan fans are gathered in muttering disapproval of what’s happening, which is as dreadful to them as it is a revelation to me. John Peel about now taps me aggressively on the shoulder and asks if I agree that what we are sitting through is a grim travesty, a reduction of a formerly great artist to abject mediocrity and worse. He’s shocked, I’d say even angry, when I contrarily offer a different opinion. He subsequently writes a scathing newspaper review describing Dylan as an irrelevant has-been, an embarrassment to his loyal and now long-suffering fans.

This is increasingly the prevailing view of Dylan. For many at this point in the ’80s, Dylan is coming to the end of a dismal decade during which he has found God, embraced messianic evangelism and as a born-again Christian fundamentalist cast himself as a fire-and-brimstone preacher, the stage a pulpit from which he delivers hell-fire sermons about the coming end of the world that have made him seem like a demented crackpot. His faith, it’s commonly held, has ruined his music, reduced its former poetry to harsh dogma to a point where it’s mostly rejected, at best held up to ridicule. His albums have stopped selling, their rapidly declining sales alarming his label who are as distraught as his audience by the ‘new direction’ he’s stubbornly been determined to follow whatever the cost to a reputation that by now has also been tarnished by the further embarrassments of the dire Hearts Of Fire movie and an appearance at Live Aid in July 1985 whose apparently crass incompetence leaves even staunch admirers cringing in disbelief. As the decade ends, in other words, Dylan is almost universally reviled as hapless, bereft of anything you could call inspiration, creatively bankrupt, in terminal artistic decline, a deluded clown, a religious fanatic unmoored from reality, or what usually passes for it, pathetic and forlorn.

This at least is one way of looking at Dylan in the ’80s. What follows is another.

The 35th Uncut Playlist Of 2016

0

 

We seem to have got more stuff than usual this week, hence the list runs to 33 here. The most significant new arrival is Michael Chapman hooking up with the Steve Gunn gang, but plenty more of interest, I’d hope: check out the crazy comp of Neil Young covers (Dave Clark Five doing “Southern Man”!); maybe approach the Leonard Cohen remix with caution…

Oh, and congratulations to our old friend, Bob Dylan. Wiggle wiggle wiggle like a bowl of soup!

Follow me on Twitter @JohnRMulvey

1 Gillian Welch – Boots No 1: The Official Revival Bootleg (Acony)

2 Felt – Forever Breathes The Lonely Word (Creation)

3 Leonard Cohen – You Want It Darker (Paul Kalkbrenner Remix) (Columbia)

4 Israel Nash – Rain Plains (Live At Plum Creek Sound)

5 Solange – A Seat At The Table (RCA)

6 Chris Schlarb – Making The Saint (Asthmatic Kitty)

7 Angelina – Vagabond Saint (Wonderful Sound)

8 Bjørn Torske: Fuglekongen (Smalltown Supersound)

9 Syreeta – The Rita Wright Years: Rare Motown 1967-1970 (Kent)

10 Thee Oh Sees – An Odd Entrances (Castle Face)

11 Dungen – Häxan (Smalltown Supersound)

12 Botany _ Deepak Verbera (Western Vinyl)

13 Michael Chapman – 50 (Paradise Of Bachelors)

14 Jim James – Eternally Even (ATO/Capitol)

15 Hiss Golden Messenger – Vestapol (Merge)

16 Richard Crandell – Then And Now (Tompkins Square)

17 Various Artists – Belle Epoque In Upper Volta (Numero Group)

18 Mike Wexler – Syntropy (Three: Four)

19 Steve Hauschildt – Strands (Kranky)

20 Chris Schlarb – Twilight And Ghost Stories (Asthmatic Kitty)

21 Alex Izenberg – Harlequin (Weird World)

22 Tashi Dorji & Tyler Damon – Both Will Escape (Family Vineyard)

23 Various Artists – A Crowded Hazy Bar: Obscure Neil Young Covers Mix (Doom And Gloom From The Tomb)

24 Lambchop – FLOTUS (City Slang/Merge)

25 Daniel Bachman – Daniel Bachman (Three Lobed)

26 Papa M – Highway Songs (Drag City)

27 Leonard Cohen – You Want It Darker (Columbia)

28 Oren Ambarchi – Hubris (Editions Mego)

29 Bob Dylan – Street Legal (Columbia)

30 Norah Jones – Day Breaks (Virgin)

31 NxWorries (Anderson Paak & Knxwledge) – Yes Lawd! (Stones Throw)

32 Loscil – Monument Builders (Kranky)

33 The Pretenders – Alone (BMG)

Billy Bragg & Joe Henry – Shine A Light – Field Recordings From The Great American Railroad

0

Ever since the railroad opened up the continent more than 150 years ago, train songs have played a special part in American popular culture. More than a method of mass transportation, the railroad became a potent symbol of manifest destiny, an emblem of the frontier spirit and a passport to personal freedom. Gold-diggers, dreamers and desperadoes took the Pacific Railroad west to find new lives in California. Black descendants of slaves filled third-class carriages on the Illinois Central out of Memphis and headed North to escape the indignity of segregation. Woody Guthrie and assorted bums and hobos jumped the box cars to ride the rails for free.

The automobile and the airplane may have since eclipsed the railroad as America’s most popular forms of transport, but nothing can match its mythology in the collective national psyche. Its romance and the songs the railroad inspired also had a profound effect on British popular music via Lonnie Donegan and the skiffle craze, reaching all the way to the youthful William Bragg growing up in Barking.

Once the most British of songwriters, Bragg has since developed his own strong Americana connections over the years, most notably via the two Mermaid Avenue albums of previously unrecorded Woody Guthrie albums he made with Wilco. His concept of an album of American railroad songs recorded during a four-day transcontinental train journey feels like a sequel to those recordings, and the North Carolina-born/Detroit-raised Joe Henry turns out to have been an inspired choice as Bragg’s travelling companion.

Singer, songwriter and Madonna’s brother-in-law, Henry’s credits as a producer include Solomon Burke, Allen Toussaint, Bonnie Raitt, Aaron Neville, Carolina Chocolate Drops and most recently Bragg, whose 2013 album Tooth & Nail he helmed. What ensued when they reunited at Chicago’s Union Station in March 2016 to board the Los Angeles-bound Texas Eagle with guitars in hand was a bona fide musical bromance, the comradeship and simplicity of which belies the sometimes fraught logistics of recording on-the-go.

Winding along 2,728 miles of track through St Louis, Fort Worth, San Antonio, El Paso and Tucson they spent 65 hours on the train, recording classic railroad songs along the way in waiting rooms and track-side during the brief stops to pick-up passengers. It meant the songs were recorded fast and spontaneously, our two contemporary hobos ready to jump back on board the moment the train pulled out for the next stop several hundred miles down the track.

The result is a beautifully atmospheric travelogue on which their two voices and twin guitars plus occasional harmonica are accompanied by nothing more than the sound of the rails humming and a lonesome whistle blowing – authentic “field recordings from the Great American Railroad” as the sub-title of Shine A Light has it.

Lead Belly’s “Rock Island Line” makes a terrific opener, Bragg’s deeper bass voice creating a dramatic counterpoint to Henry’s energetic delivery, before roles are reversed and Bragg takes the vocal lead on “Midnight Special” and “Railroad Bill” while Henry harmonises.

Hank Williams’ “Lonesome Whistle” was recorded in the train’s sleeping compartment just before turning in for the night somewhere across the Missouri plains with the clatter of the tracks providing a faint but insistent rhythm beneath them. Jimmie Rodgers’ “Waiting For A Train” features a rare Barking yodel, Henry sings a yearning version of Woody’s “Hobo’s Lullaby” and “John Henry” finds Bragg in his fieriest declamatory mode. Perhaps best of all is a deathless, harmonica-driven version of “KC Moan”, originally recorded some 87 years ago by the Memphis Jug Band.

The mostly traditional material is leavened by a brace of more recent compositions in “Early Morning Rain” and “Gentle On My Mind”, neither of them obvious railroad songs until you listen acutely to the over-familiar lyrics and the connection become clear. Like many of the songs here, you probably thought you never wanted to hear such much-covered standards again – but Bragg and Henry deliver them with an adrenalin-fuelled engagement and a heartfelt sincerity that transcends campfire singalong banality and leaves you hankering for more.

Perhaps a train heading south from Chicago for New Orleans next time and a few more contemporary songs – Dylan’s “Duquesne Whistle”, Joni Mitchell’s “Just Like This Train”, Steve Goodman’s “City Of New Orleans”, Randy Newman’s “Dixie Flyer” and Graham Nash’s “Southbound Train”, perhaps? The possibilities are endless, and we can only hope that Bragg and Henry are already consulting the Amtrak timetable to plan another trip.

Q&A
Billy Bragg & Joe Henry
How did you chose the repertoire?

BB: I was thinking about songs that had inspired people to play guitar in the UK so we picked quite a few from Lead Belly. Jimmie Rogers had to be in there and we needed the Carter Family. We didn’t want to make a record about the railroad, we wanted to make a record of the railroad.
JH: We tried to play what felt alive to us. Anything that felt like a relic, we backed off. “Gentle On My Mind” was never a consideration until we were in transit, sitting up late on the train one night on the way from Chicago to Texas.

There must have been plenty of logistical problems…

BB: First you need to find a place to set up. Most of the waiting rooms are beautifully tiled and have great acoustics. But some of them were so far away from the train you couldn’t take a chance, so we had to perform on the platform, all the time keeping our eye on the train, listening for the “all aboard”.
JH: My engineer Ryan Freeland came up with a design of four ribbon microphones, on a single stand. There was one mic for me, one mic for Bill and then a pair of mics that were all about ambient sound. We wanted it to feel like a field recording but we also wanted it to sound fully robust and realised and three-dimensional.
INTERVIEW: NIGEL WILLIAMSON

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Sainsbury’s to sell vinyl in 67 more stores

0

Sainsbury’s has announced it will stock vinyl in 67 more stores, bringing the total number of UK stores selling records to 238.

The supermarket chain began selling albums in March this year, for the first time since the 1980s and has sold more than 81,000 records to date.

According to a report in Music Week, the most successful album has been Fleetwood Mac‘s Rumours, which has sold 5,500 units to date.

To reflect the success of vinyl sales, Sainsbury’s are upping the range of titles available from 20 to 60. The new collection will be available from October 14 and will include a mix of contemporary and classic records along with seven exclusive titles. These include Pink Floyd’s Wish You Were Here and David Bowie’s Blackstar.

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Bob Dylan awarded Nobel Prize for Literature

0

Bob Dylan has been awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

The BBC reports that Dylan has received the prize “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition”.

The award will be presented alongside this year’s other five Nobel Prizes on 10 December, the anniversary of prize founder Alfred Nobel’s 1896 death.

Dylan is the first American to win the award since Toni Morrison in 1993 and follows in the footsteps of Eugene O’Neill, TS Eliot, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway and John Steinbeck.

The Guardian reports that, earlier today, Ladbrokes has Ngugi wa Thiong’o as as favourite at 7/2, with Haruki Murakami tied with the Syrian poet Adonis at 6/1.

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Lego launches Beatles’ Yellow Submarine set

0

The BeatlesYellow Submarine has been immortalized in Lego.

The 550-piece kit features Lego models of John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr.

The set was the suggestion of Kevin Szeto, who put forward the request to the toy company’s ideas section.

Szeto said, “As an amateur musician and songwriter, I have always been drawn to the music of The Beatles. The creation of the Yellow Submarine model was really my way of showing my affection for The Beatles, as well as trying to pay a small tribute to The Beatles phenomenon. The Yellow Submarine is bright, fun, and colourful, which also made it a good subject to translate into LEGO form.”

Lego designer Justin Ramsden said seeing The Beatles in Lego form “is a dream come true”.

He added: “I watched the film when I was younger and was really inspired by how it oozed so much imagination – comparable to how I view Lego elements.

“I’m also a massive fan of The Beatles, having grown up with their music all my life, so to see The Beatles in Lego form is a dream come true.”

The Lego set will be available worldwide in stores from November 1 at a cost of £49.99 (US$60).

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Hear Stevie Nicks previously unreleased demo for “Bella Donna”

0

Stevie Nicks will release deluxe editions of her first two solo albums Bella Donna and The Wild Heart.

Alongside newly remastered audio, the sets contain live and unreleased tracks and rarities. Both will be available from November 4 on Rhino.

We’re delighted to preview one of those unreleased tracks: a demo for “Bella Donna“, from Nicks’ 1981 album of the same name.

Bella Donna: Deluxe Edition track listing:
Disc One: Original Album
“Bella Donna”
“Kind Of Woman”
“Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around” – with Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers
“Think About It”
“After The Glitter Fades”
“Edge Of Seventeen”
“How Still My Love”
“Leather And Lace”
“Outside The Rain”
“The Highwayman”

Disc Two: Bonus Tracks
“Edge Of Seventeen” – Early Take *
“Think About It” – Alternate Version *
“How Still My Love” – Alternate Version *
“Leather And Lace” – Alternate Version *
“Bella Donna” – Demo *
“Gold And Braid” – Unreleased Version *
“Sleeping Angel” – Alternate Version *
“If You Were My Love” – Unreleased Version *
“The Dealer” – Unreleased Version *
“Blue Lamp” – From Heavy Metal Soundtrack
“Sleeping Angel” – From Fast Times At Ridgemont High Soundtrack

Disc Three: Live 1981
“Gold Dust Woman”
“Gold And Braid”
“I Need To Know”
“Outside The Rain”
“Dreams”
“Angel” *
“After The Glitter Fades”
“Leather And Lace” *
“Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around”
“Bella Donna” *
“Sara”
“How Still My Love” *
“Edge Of Seventeen”
“Rhiannon”

The Wild Heart: Deluxe Edition tracklisting:
Disc One: Original Album
“Wild Heart”
“If Anyone Falls”
“Gate And Garden”
“Enchanted”
“Nightbird”
“Stand Back”
“I Will Run To You” – with Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers
“Nothing Ever Changes”
“Sable On Blond”
“Beauty And The Beast”

Disc Two: Bonus Tracks
“Violet And Blue” – from Against All Odds Soundtrack
“I Sing For The Things” – Unreleased Version *
“Sable On Blond” – Alternate Version *
“All The Beautiful Worlds” – Unreleased Version *
“Sorcerer” – Unreleased Version *
“Dial The Number” – Unreleased Version *
“Garbo” – B-side
“Are You Mine” – Demo *
“Wild Heart” – Session *

* previously unreleased

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

The Who’s new My Generation box set comes with previously unreleased tracks

0

The Who have announced details of a new box set celebrating their debut album, My Generation.

The Super Deluxe Edition features unreleased songs, demos, mixes, remasters, new notes from Pete Townshend, 80 page book, rare memorabilia and much more.

A 5CD box set is released on November 18 with 3LP and 2LP editions following on February 10, 2017.

Of the super deluxe box set Pete Townshend says, “Gathering these demos for this collection has been enjoyable; it’s wonderful for me to have these tapes made fifty-two years ago to listen to. I hope you enjoy them. They have a naiveté and innocence, a simplicity and directness, and an ingenuousness that reveals me as a young man struggling to keep up with the more mature and developed men around me. What an incredible group of strong, talented, young and engaging men they were!”

The album contains three previously unreleased songs – “The Girls I Could Have Had”, “As Children We Grew”, “My Own Love” alongside previously unheard demos and mixes.

My Generation Super Deluxe track listing:
CD1: Original album (mono mixes)
Out In The Street
I Don’t Mind
The Good’s Gone
La-La-La Lies
Much Too Much
My Generation
The Kids Are Alright
Please, Please, Please
It’s Not True
I’m A Man
A Legal Matter
The Ox

CD2: Original album (new stereo mixes)
Out In The Street
I Don’t Mind
The Good’s Gone
La-La-La Lies
Much Too Much
My Generation
The Kids Are Alright
Please, Please, Please
It’s Not True
I’m A Man
A Legal Matter
The Ox

CD3: Mono mixes – bonus tracks
I Can’t Explain
Bald Headed Woman
Daddy Rolling Stone
Leaving Here
Lubie, Come Back Home
Shout And Shimmy
(Love Is Like A) Heatwave
Motoring
Anytime You Want Me
Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere
Instant Party Mixture
Circles
Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere (French EP Mix)
Out In the Street (Alt guitar break)
Out In the Street (Alt early vocal)
I Don’t Mind (Full Length)
The Good’s Gone (Full Length)
My Generation (Alt version)
I’m A Man (V2 – Early vocal)
Daddy Rolling Stone (alt. take)
Lubie (Alt Mix)
Shout And Shimmy (Alt mix)
Circles (Alt Mix)

CD4: Stereo mixes – bonus tracks
Out In The Street (Alt – Take 1)
I Don’t Mind (Full Length Version)
The Good’s Gone (Full Length Version)
My Generation (Instrumental Version)
The Kids Are Alright (Alt – Take 1)
I Can’t Explain
Bald Headed Woman
Daddy Rolling Stone
Daddy Rolling Stone (Alt version)
Leaving Here
Lubie, Come Back Home
Shout And Shimmy
(Love Is Like A) Heatwave
Motoring
Anytime You Want Me
Instant Party Mixture
Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere
Circles (New Mix)
Daddy Rolling Stone (Alt Take B – New Mix)
Out In The Street (Alt Take 2)
I’m A Man (Alt – New Mix)

CD5: The Demos
My Generation (V 3)
My Generation (V 2 – fragment)
The Girls I Could’ve Had
It’s Not True
As Children We Grew
Legal Matter
Sunrise (V 1)
Much Too Much
My Own Love
La-La-La- Lies
The Good’s Gone

My Generation 3 LP set track listing:
Disc One: Original LP – Mono mixes
Side 1
Out In The Street
I Don’t Mind
The Good’s Gone
La-La-La Lies
Much Too Much
My Generation

Side 2
The Kids Are Alright
Please, Please, Please
It’s Not True
I’m A Man
A Legal Matter
The Ox

Disc Two; Mono bonus tracks
Side 1
I Can’t Explain
Bald Headed Woman
Daddy Rolling Stone
Leaving Here
Lubie, Come Back Home
Shout And Shimmy

Side 2
(Love Is Like A) Heatwave
Motoring
Anytime You Want Me
Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere
Instant Party Mixture
Circles

Disc Three; Demos
Side 1
My Generation (V 3)
My Generation (V 2 – fragment)
The Girls I Could’ve Had
It’s Not True
As Children We Grew
Legal Matter

Side 2
Sunrise (V 1)
Much Too Much
My Own Love
La-La-La- Lies
The Good’s Gone

My Generation 2 LP SET E-commerce exclusive track listing:
Disc One – Original LP (Stereo Mixes)

Side 1
Out In The Street
I Don’t Mind
The Good’s Gone
La-La-La Lies
Much Too Much
My Generation

Side 2
The Kids Are Alright
Please, Please, Please
It’s Not True
I’m A Man
A Legal Matter
The Ox

Disc Two – Stereo bonus tracks

Side 1
In The Street (Alt Take 1)
I Don’t Mind (Full Length Version)
The Good’s Gone (Full Length Version)
My Generation (Instrumental Version)
The Kids Are Alright (Alt Take 1)
I Can’t Explain
Daddy Rolling Stone
Leaving Here

Side 2
Lubie, Come Back Home
Shout And Shimmy
Love Is Like A) Heatwave
Motoring
Anytime You Want Me
Instant Party Mixture
Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere
Circles (New Mix)

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

John Lennon: The Ultimate Music Guide

0

A few days after John Lennon died, in December 1980, the NME’s editor at the time, Neil Spencer, sat down and tried to encapsulate the man’s genius, influence and complexity. By necessity, the resulting obituary turned out to be a lengthy and emotional meditation. “It was not merely that his songs provided the soundtrack for our lives that made Lennon the voice of his generation,” wrote Spencer, “but that they so often seemed to crystallise the mood of the times, and to do so with an honesty that was apparent in the way the man lived out his life.

“That is one reason why his loss has hit the world so hard. Like most of us he was often selfish and unpleasant, but he was never miserly with himself or his soul, at least not in the latter part of his life. He gave. He shared. And now he’s gone, we too seem diminished. The part of us that responded to the man’s essential goodness, his dignity, his openness, and his optimism will be that much more difficult to locate without him around.”

“To say he is destined to be judged as one of the great men of his age is not mere emotionalism or fan adulation,” continued Spencer and, 36 years down the line, that judgment is more secure than ever. Looking through the back copies of NME and Melody Maker, however, Lennon’s legacy seemed a little more unstable, volatile even, for much of the 1970s. For our newly upgraded John Lennon Ultimate Music Guide (on sale Thursday, available online here), alongside extensive reviews of all his solo recordings, we’ve delved into those archives and come up with some frankly amazing stuff. Lennon famously had the UK music weeklies flown out to him in New York, where he read them avidly and was prone to firing off letters to them, usually about the persistent rumours of a Beatles reunion – though he was inclined to pass comment on anything that caught his attention.

Lennon also frequently entertained writers from both Melody Maker and NME throughout the ’70s, allowed them unique access to recording sessions and his Dakota apartment, and talked to them at length about just about anything they wanted to know. These archive gems offer a priceless insight into Lennon, his life and music, and we’ve also reprinted a 2003 Uncut cover story, in which Yoko recalls in extraordinary detail her life with John, who she memorably describes as a “beautiful miracle”. The memory of it is something solid inside her, she makes clear, and the thought if it or John’s music ever fading is one thing that neither she – nor, indeed, anyone else – could ever imagine.

Otis Redding: Hear a never-before-released live version of “Any Ole Way” from 1966

0

Otis Redding – Live At The Whisky A Go Go: The Complete Recordings is due on October 21 through STAX / UMC.

The comprehensive six-disc set collects in chronological order Redding’s seven sets recorded between Friday, April 8 – Sunday, April 10, 1966.

Redding’s sets included “Respect”, “I’ve Been Loving You Too Long” alongside his version of The Rolling Stones’ “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” and covers of The Beatles‘ “A Hard Day’s Night” and James Brown‘s “Papa’s Got A Brand New Bag”.

We’re delighted to be able to offer you a taster of the set, in the shape of this exclusive, never-before-released live version of “Any Ole Way“, taken from Redding’s second set on Saturday, April 9.

The box set features newly remixed and remastered recordings from all the April 1966 concerts. Although some of the performances had previously appeared on the 1968 album, In Person At The Whisky A Go Go, the new collection includes previously unreleased tracks and all of Redding’s between song banter.

otis_tn.jsp

You can pre-order the set by clicking here.

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Paul Weller forms supergroup with Robert Wyatt, Danny Thompson to play concert for Jeremy Corbyn

0

Paul Weller is to take part in a series of concerts in support of Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn.

Weller will front a one-off group also featuring Robert Wyatt, Pentangle’s Danny Thompson and Weller’s drummers Steve Pilgrim and Ben Gordelier.

The show, People Powered: Concert For Corbyn, will be held at Brighton Dome on December 16. It’s the first in a planned series of gigs celebrating Corbyn’s policies.

lso playing the show are Temples, Kathryn Williams, Stealing Sheep, The Farm, Jim Jones And The Righteous Mind, Edgar Summertyme and Ghetto Priest. Tickets are £25, on sale on Friday (October 14).

The show is the first time that former Wyatt has played live since he curated Meltdown Festival in 2001. In 2014, Wyatt had retired from making music.

“I’m doing the gig because I like what Corbyn says and stands for,” says Weller. “I think its time to take the power out of the hands of the elite and hand it back to the people of this country. I want to see a government that has some integrity and compassion.”

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Desert Trip: set lists and clips from Bob Dylan, The Rolling Stones, Neil Young, Paul McCartney, The Who, Roger Waters

0

The first Desert Trip weekend took place at Empire Polo Grounds, Indio, California from Friday, October 7 – Sunday, October 9.

The Los Angeles Times reports capacity of around 75,000 per day, who saw Bob Dylan, The Rolling Stones, Neil Young, Paul McCartney, The Who and Roger Waters perform at the festival.

Dylan opened the weekend, performing “Rainy Day Women #12 & 35” at the piano, closing with “Masters Of War”.

He was followed by the Stones, whose set featured several surprises. The ban covered The Beatles’ “Come Together” and performing Eddie Taylor’s “Ride ‘Em On Down” for the first time since the early Sixties; the song appears on their forthcoming Blue & Lonesome album.

Other surprises included Neil Young joining Paul McCartney on the Saturday for three songs, “A Day in the Life”, “Give Peace a Chance” and “Why Don’t We Do It in the Road?”.

The same artists return for a second weekend on October 14, 15 and 16.

Friday, October 7
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LEuxQ9mEY84

Bob Dylan set-list:
Rainy Day Women #12 & 35
Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right
Highway 61 Revisited
It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue
High Water (For Charley Patton)
Simple Twist of Fate
Early Roman Kings
Love Sick
Tangled Up in Blue
Lonesome Day Blues
Make You Feel My Love
Pay in Blood
Desolation Row
Soon After Midnight
Ballad of a Thin Man

Encore
Masters of War

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lsv27YNj904

Rolling Stones set-list:
Start Me Up
You Got Me Rocking
Out of Control
Ride ‘Em on Down
Mixed Emotions
Wild Horses
It’s Only Rock ‘n’ Roll (But I Like It)
Come Together
Tumbling Dice
Honky Tonk Women
Slipping Away
Little T&A
Midnight Rambler
Miss You
Gimme Shelter
Sympathy for the Devil
Brown Sugar
Jumpin’ Jack Flash

Encore
You Can’t Always Get What You Want
(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction

Saturday, October 8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hOh5ETyyKuE

Neil Young and Promise Of The Real set-list:
After the Gold Rush
Heart of Gold
Comes a Time
Mother Earth (Natural Anthem)
Out on the Weekend
Human Highway
Neighborhood
Show Me
Harvest Moon
Words
Walk On
Texas Rangers
Powderfinger
Down by the River
Seed Justice
Peace Trail
Welfare Mothers

Encore
Rockin’ in the Free World

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DX1pQuzmbt0

Paul McCartney set-list:
A Hard Day’s Night
Jet
Can’t Buy Me Love
Letting Go
Day Tripper
Let Me Roll It
I’ve Got a Feeling
My Valentine
Nineteen Hundred and Eighty-Five
Maybe I’m Amazed
We Can Work It Out
In Spite of All the Danger
I’ve Just Seen a Face
Love Me Do
And I Love Her
Blackbird
Here Today
Queenie Eye
Lady Madonna
FourFiveSeconds
Eleanor Rigby
Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite!
A Day in the Life
Give Peace a Chance
Why Don’t We Do It in the Road?
Something
Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da
Band on the Run
Back in the U.S.S.R.
Let It Be
Live and Let Die
Hey Jude

Encore
I Wanna Be Your Man
Helter Skelter
Golden Slumbers
Carry That Weight
The End

Sunday, October 9

The Who set-list:
I Can’t Explain
The Seeker
Who Are You
The Kids Are Alright
I Can See for Miles
My Generation
Behind Blue Eyes
Bargain
Join Together
You Better You Bet
5:15
I’m One
The Rock
Love, Reign O’er Me
Eminence Front
Amazing Journey
Sparks
The Acid Queen
Pinball Wizard
See Me, Feel Me
Baba O’Riley
Won’t Get Fooled Again

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2bfnxztWUVo

Roger Waters set-list:
Speak to Me
Breathe
Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun
One of These Days
Time
Breathe (Reprise)
The Great Gig in the Sky
Money
Us and Them
Fearless
You’ll Never Walk Alone
Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Parts I-V)
Welcome to the Machine
Have a Cigar
Wish You Were Here

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Radiohead’s scrapped Third Man sessions: “Not Worth Waiting For,” says Ed O’Brien

0

Radiohead‘s Ed O’Brien has explained why the band’s 2012 recording session at Jack White‘s Third Man Records has never been released.

In 2012, White confirmed that the band had recorded at his Nashville studio but stated that he had not personally worked with them on the music.

Speaking on BBC Radio 6 Music‘s programme, The First Time With, O’Brien told presenter Matt Everitt about why the Third Man session hasn’t seen the light of day, saying: “I don’t know. It was alright. It was OK. I can’t really remember. It was really fun. Jack was so hospitable, him and his engineer—he records everything on 8-track. Listen, it’s not worth waiting for. If anything was amazing, you can be sure—we’d try and put it out.”

Listen to the full interview by clicking here.

Last month, a new, unheard Radiohead song “Ill Wind” appeared online from the special edition of A Moon Shaped Pool.

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Pink Floyd reissue Animals on vinyl for the first time in 20 years

0

Pink Floyd continue the reintroduction of their catalogue on vinyl with Animals, which has remastered from the original analogue master tapes and reissued on vinyl for the first time in over 20 years.

Wish You Were Here and The Dark Side Of The Moon are also back in stock on vinyl from October 14th and November 4th respectively.

Also released on November 11 is The Early Years 1965-1972, a deluxe 27-disc boxset featuring 7 individual book-style packages, including never before released material. In addition to the deluxe set, a 2-CD highlights album called The Early Years – Cre/ation will also be available.

The band have also revealed a video for the 2016 Remix of “Childhood’s End” from The Early Years 1965-1972 box.

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

Reviewed: War On Everyone

0

“If you ain’t got a good script, you ain’t got shit,” says one character in John Michael McDonagh’s latest film; a bold assessment, as it turns out. In cahoots with actor Brendan Gleeson, McDonagh’s previous films, The Guard and Calvary, explored the rich landscape of Ireland and the idiosyncratic characters one might encounter there. War On Everyone finds a shifting of gears and a new geographical setting: America.

In 2012, McDonagh’s brother Martin made his American debut with the uneven Seven Psychopaths – would his sibling make a smoother transition Stateside?

War On Everyone follows the exploits of Terry (Alexander Skarsgård) and Bob (Michael Peña), two corrupt cops working a beat in New Mexico. After a series of suspensions, they are on their last chance when they get a whiff of a bank heist involving a dastardly British aristocrat and his dandyish sidekick; events then take a turn for the worst.

Evidently, McDonagh is enjoying himself here – his dialogue is crisp and funny and Skarsgård and Peña enjoy the bants. “The world is full of injustices,” Terry counsels one aggrieved perp. “Call Amnesty International,” suggests Bob. McDonagh drops in amusingly incongruous references to Conrad, Diaghilev and Van Gogh, among others; a brief trip to Iceland proves comically rewarding. It is fun enough, but it lacks the richness and complexity of McDonagh’s earlier work. It also lacks a conspirator like Gleeson, whose spirit, heart and substance is missing here.

Follow me on Twitter @MichaelBonner

The November 2016 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The Specials, plus Bon Iver, Bob Weir, Shirley Collins, Conor Oberst, Peter Hook, Bad Company, Leonard Cohen, Muscle Shoals, Will Oldham, Oasis, Lou Reed, Otis Redding, Nina Simone, Frank Ocean, Michael Kiwanuka and more plus 140 reviews and our free 15-track CD

The 34th Uncut Playlist Of 2016

0

Lots to get through today, so here’s a quick summary of the new arrivals. Best Dungen in a while… A new one from Jim James (I think I currently prefer his solo work to his My Morning Jacket stuff)… The amazing Solange album (please, please give “Cranes In The Sky” a try)… Major Stars and Calvin Johnson?Dub Narcotic albums incoming… Yet another Oh Sees album… THE ROLLING STONES (allow me one day to make a case for what a decent album “A Bigger Bang” was, by the way)… And, just as I began to put this list together, the Gillian Welch official bootleg set turned up. I’m playing that one as I type, and will write more further down the line

Follow me on Twitter @JohnRMulvey

1 Dungen – Häxan (Smalltown Supersound)

2 Jim James – Eternally Even (ATO/Capitol)

3 Lambchop – FLOTUS (City Slang/Merge)

4 Solange – A Seat At The Table (RCA)

5 Major Stars – Motion Set (Drag City)

6 Calvin Johnson’s Selector Dub Narcotic – This Party Is Just Getting Started (K Records)

7 Iggy Pop – New Values (Arista)

8 NxWorries (Anderson Paak & Knxwledge) – Yes Lawd! (Stones Throw)

9 Psychic Temple – Psychic Temple II (Asthmatic Kitty)

10 Phish – Big Boat (Jemp)

11 Hiss Golden Messenger – Heart Like A Levee (Merge)

12 Thee Oh Sees – An Odd Entrances (Castle Face)

13 The Rolling Stones – Just Your Fool (Polydor)

14 Andy Shauf – The Party (Anti-)

15 The Lemon Twigs – Do Hollywood (4AD)

16 Feral Ohms – Live In San Francisco (Castle Face)

17 Leonard Cohen – You Want It Darker (Columbia)

18 Loscil – Monument Builders (Kranky)

19 Gillian Welch – Boots No 1: The Official Revival Bootleg (Acony)

Oasis on Be Here Now: “This record ain’t going to surprise many people”

0

Liam Gallagher loves his wife, Tina Turner and Neighbours, hates sleep and Andy Bell’s band, and is anxious to show he’s not frightened of aliens. Noel Gallagher, meanwhile, has a lot to say about fame, drugs, the government, the bonding rituals of Paul Weller, the future of Oasis – and even their new album, Be Here Now. TED KESSLER switches on the tape recorder, opens the Hooch bottles and listens, amazed…

Originally published in the 12/7/97 issue of NME, and reprinted in Uncut’s Oasis Ultimate Music Guide – buy a copy now while stocks last…

_________________________

They need to be themselves, they can’t be no-one else. Well, maybe. Right now, bustling through the photo studio’s huge steel doors in a flurry of green and blue, Noel and Liam Gallagher are each other. Same hair, same scowl, same swagger, same security guards: brothers. In matching Kangol parkas.

“I swear I didn’t know he was going to wear his,” says Noel, fingering his designer logo. “Do you think I’d have turned up wearing the same clobber as that cunt on purpose?”

“Yeah, right,” smirks Liam, “you were on the phone to Pats going, ‘What’s he wearing, what’s he wearing? I’ve got to make sure it matches.’”

Noel rolls his eyes. “Er, right. We should make sure we get some money off Kangol for this.”

“Too right! Can’t wear anything these days.”

“Yeah,” agrees Noel. “Can’t wear anything these days without someone trying to give us money for it. Bloody terrible, that is. Do you want a sarnie?”

“No, but I’m mad for a beer.” Liam swivels around looking for his security guard. “Get
us a couple of beers, mate. I’m going to hit fucking Paris tonight! I’ve been in for three days and nights doing fuck all, just watching Neighbours twice a day. I’m getting a thing for Helen fucking Daniels and it’s not healthy! I am gasping for a proper night out. It’s going to be top!”

Noel momentarily brightens. It’s not been a great morning, but the future smells sweeter.

“Yeah,” he says, nudging his brother, “just you and me in Paris! We’re going to have a right party! Patsy and Meg will be panicking, ringing the hotel rooms, wondering where we are and we won’t be there. We’ll be out!”

“Yeah,” agrees Liam decisively, “we’ll be right out!”

But first, perhaps, a little more time in. We only have a few hours before the train pulls out of Waterloo, but these will be hours well spent, on the last day in June in a North London studio, staring out a photographer with glacial cool, before taking turns to impart wild nonsense and steely sense into a microphone. It will be time spent reflecting upon what it means and how it feels to be the two figureheads in the biggest and best rock’n’roll band of our generation as they prepare to unleash another epic record.

It will be time, too, for Oasis to step back into the ring and casually take a huge bite out of their opponents’ ears.

“I see Hurricane #1 went in at No 35,” notes Noel, chomping into his BLT and nodding at his press officer. This is not a congratulation, but an opening jab at labelmates who recently and foolishly lashed out at Liam in NME. “That’s 35 places too high in my book.”

“Hurricane #1?” queries Liam, sauntering over. “He copies my haircut and then slags me off! What’s that about? But I ain’t into this bickering between bands now. I’m a married man. I’ll just blank the cunt.”

“No you won’t, you’ll batter the cunt!”

“Who’ll I batter? Hurricane #1? Never heard of them. Isn’t that some indie band with the guy from Erasure in them?”