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Guests revealed for Richard Thompson’s 70th birthday show

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An incredible line-up of special guests has been revealed for Richard Thompson’s 70th birthday celebration show at London’s Royal Albert Hall on September 30.

It includes (deep breath) Alistair Anderson, Ashley Hutchings, Bob Mould, Christine Collister, Danny Thompson, Dave Mattacks, Dave Pegg, David Gilmour, Derek Smalls, Eliza Carthy, Hugh Cornwell, Jack Thompson, James Walbourne, Judith Owen, Kami Thompson, Kate Rusby, Linda Thompson, Loudon Wainwright III, Maddy Prior, Marc Ellington, Martin Carthy, Olivia Chaney, Simon Nicol, Teddy Thompson and Zara Phillips.

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The show has long since sold out, but a press releases advises checking for the release of last minute tickets here.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

The Replacements announce Dead Man’s Pop box set

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The Replacements will release a 4xCD + 1xLP box set called Dead Man’s Pop via Rhino on September 27.

The centrepiece of the package is a stripped-down version of their 1989 album Don’t Tell A Soul, which the band always regarded as too slick.

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Dead Man’s Pop
features a newly completed mix of the album by Don’t Tell A Soul producer Matt Wallace, based on his 1988 Paisley Park mix; a disc of unreleased recordings, including a session with Tom Waits; plus the band’s entire June 2, 1989 show at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. In total, the box includes 60 tracks, 58 of which have never been heard before.

Presented in a 12×12 hardcover book – loaded with dozens of rarely seen photos – the box set features a detailed history of the Don’t Tell A Soul era written by Bob Mehr, who also wrote Trouble Boys: The True Story of the Replacements.

Mehr writes: “While it’s impossible to unhear a record that’s been around for three decades, Don’t Tell A Soul Redux is the album the band made and intended to release. In addition to Matt Wallace’s mix, Redux also restores several crucial elements from the sessions, including original drums tracks, vocal takes and tempos that were altered in post-production… [and] the band’s original sequence of the album.”

Wallace says: “The true spirit of The Replacements was always there on the recordings we did back in 1988, and now you can hear and feel it clearly… This was the project of a lifetime for me when we recorded it 30-plus years ago, and it’s even truer today as we’ve finally fulfilled our original vision.”

Check out the tracklisting below and pre-order Dead Man’s Pop here, where the first 500 purchasers will also receive a 14-track cassette featuring highlights from the box along with two additional unreleased tracks: the outtake “Asking Me Lies” and an instrumental of “I Won’t” (Bearsville Version). The cassette also features the original, unused cover art for Don’t Tell A Soul.

Disc One: Don’t Tell A Soul Redux
“Talent Show” – Matt Wallace Mix *
“I’ll Be You” – Matt Wallace Mix *
“We’ll Inherit The Earth” – Matt Wallace Mix *
“Achin’ To Be” – Matt Wallace Mix *
“Darlin’ One” – Matt Wallace Mix *
“Back To Back” – Matt Wallace Mix *
“I Won’t” – Matt Wallace Mix *
“Asking Me Lies” – Matt Wallace Mix *
“They’re Blind” – Matt Wallace Mix *
“Anywhere’s Better Than Here” – Matt Wallace Mix *
“Rock ’n’ Roll Ghost” – Matt Wallace Mix *

Disc Two: We Know The Night: Rare and Unreleased
“Portland” – Alternate Mix (Bearsville Version) *
“Achin’ To Be” – Bearsville Version *
“I’ll Be You” – Bearsville Version *
“Wake Up” – Alternate Mix – Bearsville Version *
“We’ll Inherit The Earth” – Bearsville Version *
“Last Thing In The World” *
“They’re Blind” – Bearsville Version *
“Rock ’n’ Roll Ghost” – Bearsville Version *
“Darlin’ One” – Bearsville Version *
“Talent Show” – Demo Version
“Dance On My Planet” *
“We Know The Night” – Alternate Outtake *
“Ought To Get Love” – Alternate Mix *
“Gudbuy T’Jane” – Outtake
“Lowdown Monkey Blues” – Featuring Tom Waits *
“If Only You Were Lonely” – Featuring Tom Waits *
“We Know The Night” – Featuring Tom Waits (Rehearsal) *
“We Know The Night” – Featuring Tom Waits (Full Band Version) *
“I Can Help” – Featuring Tom Waits *
“Date To Church” – Matt Wallace Remix*

Disc Three: The Complete Inconcerated Live, Part One
“Alex Chilton” *
“Talent Show” *
“Back To Back” *
“I Don’t Know” *
“The Ledge” *
“Waitress In The Sky” *
“Anywhere’s Better Than Here” *
“Nightclub Jitters” *
“Cruella De Ville” *
“Achin’ To Be” *
“Asking Me Lies” *
“Bastards Of Young” *
“Answering Machine” *
“Little Mascara” *
“I’ll Be You” *

Disc Four: The Complete Inconcerated Live, Part Two

“Darlin’ One” *
“I Will Dare” *
“Another Girl, Another Planet” *
“I Won’t” *
“Unsatisfied” *
“We’ll Inherit The Earth” *
“Can’t Hardly Wait” *
“Color Me Impressed” *
“Born To Lose” *
“Never Mind” *
“Here Comes A Regular” *
“Valentine” *
“Left Of The Dial” *
“Black Diamond” *

* previously unreleased

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Hear Tinariwen’s new song, “Zawal”

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Tinariwen’s new album Amadjar is out on September 6, featuring guests including Cass McCombs, Micah Nelson and Sunn O)))’s Stephen O’Malley.

Read more about it here and listen to a new song from it, “Zawal”, about witnessing the solar eclipse. It features The Bad Seeds’ Warren Ellis, plus Noura Mint Seymali and Jeiche Ould Chighaly:

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Tinariwen have four UK and Ireland dates coming up, check them out below:

11.11.19 – Olympia – DUBLIN
12.11.19 – Trinity – BRISTOL
13.11.19 – Manchester Cathedral – MANCHESTER
14.11.19 – EaRTH – LONDON

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Send us your questions for Brittany Howard!

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Over the course of two albums and countless shows of declamatory rock’n’soul with Alabama Shakes, Brittany Howard has established herself as one of the most powerful voices in music.

Now she’s taking a sabbatical from the band to release her debut album Jaime, a record that’s more intimate and personal but just as hard-hitting.

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Musically influenced by everything from Prince and neo-soul to lo-fi funk, gospel and electronica, Jaime was realised with the help of a crack group of musicians including jazzers Nate Smith and Robert Glasper, and Howard’s Alabama Shakes bandmate Zac Cockrell.

Howard says that she was inspired to write the record by travelling across the USA. “I saw many beautiful things and many heartbreaking things: poverty, loneliness, discouraged people, empty and poor towns. And of course the great swathes of natural, untouched lands. Huge pink mountains, seemingly endless lakes, soaring redwoods and yellow plains that stretch for thousands of acres. There were these long moments of silence in the car when I could sit and reflect. I wondered what it was I wanted for myself next. I suppose all I want is to help others feel a bit better about being. All I can offer are my own stories in hopes of not only being seen and understood, but also to learn to love my own self as if it were an act of resistance.”

To get yourself up to speed, listen to the previously released singles from Jaime: “History Repeats” is here and “Stay High” is here.

So what do you want to ask? Send your questions to audiencewith@uncut.co.uk by Wednesday (July 24) – please note the new email address – and Brittany Howard will answer the best ones in a future issue of Uncut.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Watch a video for The Flaming Lips’ new single

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The Flaming Lips have released a typically psychedelic video for “How Many Times”.

The single is taken from their current album King’s Mouth, which was released on Friday. “Age has not withered their magical weirdness,” wrote Uncut’s Stephen Dalton in our 8/10 album review. Watch the video below:

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The Flaming Lips play three UK headline shows in September to celebrate the 20th anniversary of their classic album, The Soft Bulletin:

Thursday 5th September – EDINBURGH – Usher Hall
Friday 6th September – MANCHESTER – Academy
Saturday 7th September – LONDON – O2 Academy Brixton

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Introducing NME Gold: Best of NME 1985 – 1989

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To the ’80s, then. Or, more specifically, the second half. In this latest instalment of our ongoing NME Gold series, we witness creativity, rebirth and downright weirdness as it occurred during 1985 – 1989 as documented in the pages of NME. As someone who came of age during this period, these archive pieces on Madchester, The Smiths and more are especially vivid. And beyond that, there’s also a splendid forward by Black Francis. It’s in shops from this Thursday (July 25) but you can buy it from our online store here. Anyway, here’s John Robinson, our one-shots editor, to tell you more, as well as a teaser from Francis’ intro.

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The latest in our Best Of NME series charts 1985-9. A blend of archive features and new eyewitness accounts, the mag contains wonderful new insights on the music world post-Live Aid. Includes arguments with Joni Mitchell, the reinvention of Robert Plant, John Cale and the birth of Madchester, and life in the studio with Tom Waits: “Play like a fat guy in a hat!”

“When I first started, in Boston the mainstream side of things was really easy to laugh at,” recalls Black Francis in his introduction. “Heavy metal had grown into something with a lot of hair and all the clichés of spandex, something about the mainstream was shallow and it was easy to not be that. When MTV first started I was about seventeen and at high school, I’d never seen it before and I went on a ski trip and there was a television at the motel and MTV was on and I remember seeing The English Beat and Elvis Costello and stuff like that and I thought ‘oh, there’s something interesting going on in the world and it’s right here on MTV. A couple of years later when I was starting a band it had grown and become much more dominated by the big-selling commercial music. At the beginning we didn’t know what was gonna be hot and they were just throwing stuff at the wall to see what would stick.

“At the other end of the scene, though, was a very strong seam of underground college rock. In the USA there was a system of radio stations and radio was much more important to people in terms of their consumption of music. So literally at the left of the dial there were all these little, barely regulated college radio stations that college kids ran. So as you travelled around touring there was all this stuff happening on the radio, all these underground bands, and all the bands from out of town, Australia or England or wherever, they were all coming to your city and paying at the club. I was just looking to make music but there was this underground rock music all over that seemed quite healthy. I wanted in on that, that was my big motivator.”

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

The Meters’ Art Neville has died, aged 81

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Art Neville, singer and keyboardist of legendary New Orleans funk band The Meters, has died aged 81.

During a musical career that spanned seven decades, he was feted by everyone from Dr John to Paul McCartney to The Rolling Stones, his style proving hugely influential on the development of popular music.

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Neville was just 16 when his band The Hawketts recorded “Mardi Gras Mambo”, a song which remains of staple of New Orleans’ Mardi Gras celebrations.

He later formed Art Neville & The Neville Sounds who became the house band for Allen Toussaint’s Sansu Records, before morphing into The Meters. As well as putting out a string of trailblazing funk records, The Meters backed Dr John on In The Right Place and toured with The Rolling Stones in the mid-70s.

Neville then teamed up with his brothers Aaron and Cyril to form The Neville Brothers, who won a Grammy for “Healing Chant” from their acclaimed 1989 album Yellow Moon.

In later years, Neville reformed The Meters (sometimes billed as The Funky Meters) and continued to perform until his retirement last year.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Rufus and Martha Wainwright announce Christmas shows

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Rufus and Martha Wainwright have announced that they will play three special Christmas shows in December.

‘A Not So Silent Night’ comes to Dublin’s National Concert Hall on December 2 and 3, and London’s Royal Festival Hall on December 6. Special guests are promised, and The Feeling’s Dan Gillespie Sells will act as musical director.

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The shows mark the tenth anniversary of the Wainwrights’ last ‘A Not So Silent Night’ event in London, which was also the last ever live performance by their mother Kate McGarrigle. All proceeds from the concerts will go towards the Kate McGarrigle Fund supporting sarcoma research, and a music therapy programme for cancer patients to be launched by Martha Wainwright in conjunction with Stand Up To Cancer Canada.

Tickets go on general sale on Friday (July 26) although you can sign up for pre-sales by visiting the official event sites for London’s Southbank and Dublin’s National Concert Hall.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

The Who on their new album: “The songs are fabulous”

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The new issue of Uncut – in shops now or available to buy online by clicking here – features a comprehensive interview with The Who about their incredible 2019: orchestral shows, old favourites revisited, and the upcoming release of their first new album since 2006.

In Nick Hasted’s feature, among many other revelations, Roger Daltrey explains how he overcame his initial reservations about the new Who material.

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“Pete presented me with 12 demos,” the singer recalls. “And there were four, maybe five, of them which I really didn’t like. I thought it was a great Pete Townshend solo album. I told him that. And he got quite angry! He said, ‘I wrote them for you!’ I said, ‘Pete, I don’t know how I can improve it.’ I couldn’t see myself climbing in. I don’t know why. Maybe my passion for The Who’s started to disappear.”

Daltrey eventually modified Townshend’s words till he could sing them. “I said can I change the tense of that song, and move it from being an ‘I’ song to being inclusive? Pete said: ‘Yeah.’ So slowly but surely I climbed into it. I don’t think anyone’s ever understood, including Pete, that doing what I do with his songs is certainly not fucking easy. You have to live them. Do I have to change the songs till I can mean them? Yes. It has to come from my heart. It can’t come from my head. When it comes from my heart, I will touch you with those words. Sometimes I have to change the words to make that possible.”

By May, Daltrey had nearly finished his vocals for eight songs. He prefers to work nowhere near their writer. “Pete [initially] wanted this album out for June,” he says. “So I went under incredible pressure to a little studio near me in Sussex, and I didn’t have time to bugger around with a new producer. I got Dave Eringa, who produced my last solo album and the Wilko Johnson album, because he knows how I like to work. I went into the studio for eight afternoons – because I can only do three hours at a time. I don’t let my voice get worn out at all these days. When I record, I like to do it like I’m a painter. I sketch. I dab notes on, and go away and live with it for a while. Then I went in one day, after I’d done all my sketches, and did the whole thing.” He’s satisfied with the results. “I have to say it’s a far better Who album than it is a Pete Townshend album! I mean, I don’t know what people want out of The Who any more. But the songs are fabulous.”

Townshend summarised those songs, tongue in vicinity of cheek, as “dark ballads, heavy rock stuff, experimental electronica, sampled stuff, and clichéd Who tunes that begin with a guitar that goes danga-dang”.

“I’m not too sold on the electronic stuff,” Daltrey considers. “Generally I find that stuff now is dated. I love guitars. And I love the bass guitar in particular. And he’s my favourite all-time guitarist. All the other guys are technicians and they’re brilliant, and they might be fast and they might be slick. Townshend’s always original. And that for me is everything. He’s always searching.”

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Brian Eno – Apollo: Atmospheres 
& Soundtracks

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As the ’80s dawned, humanity was once again turning its eyes to the skies. In March 1983, Ronald Reagan, a former screen cowboy turned 40th President Of The United States, unveiled his latest strategy in an increasingly hot Cold War – a strategic missile defence system which, in a nod to the pop culture of the day, earned the nickname “Star Wars”. Star Wars was conceived in the very American spirit that the best defence was a good offence.

The idea was that a notional Soviet strike might be averted by simply blasting enemy missiles out of the sky with laser-guided warheads – a sort of nuclear-powered equivalent of the quick-witted gunslinger in a Hollywood western who disarms his opponent by shooting the revolver out of his hand. It was all a reminder that the cosmos represented something new in the American psyche: not merely a blank canvas to be explored, but a place to be conquered – in the words of another TV show, the final frontier.

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Some four months after Reagan’s speech, music fans were granted another, rather more benign vision of the cosmos. Brian Eno had been experimenting with his idea of ambient music for approaching a decade, but Apollo: Atmospheres & Soundtracks was perhaps the finest, most refined example of ambient to date. Apollo is mostly rooted in a sort of dreamy somnambulance, but in fact underwent a rather troubled birth. It was originally commissioned as the score to a feature-length documentary by director Al Reinert that made use of previously unseen 35mm footage of the Apollo 11 moon landings. But after some poorly received test screenings, Reinert returned to the editing suite for some extensive reworking. (The film finally saw wide release in 1989 under the name For All Mankind, with some of Eno’s score excised.)

Instead, Eno’s Apollo took on a life of its own. In places, its 12 tracks recall earlier records that sought to grapple with the majesty and enormity of the cosmos. “The Secret Place” and “Signals” owe something to the minimal kosmische music practised by German electronic groups like Tangerine Dream and Cluster, creating a lonely and isolated sound using heavily treated guitars and synths soaked in echo and delay. But Apollo is not all so abstract. On the contrary, the presence of two new collaborators – a young Canadian guitarist/producer named Daniel Lanois and Eno’s younger brother Roger, a classically trained pianist here making 
his recording debut – nudges Apollo into more overtly musical territory.

Speaking with Reinert, Eno had discovered that all the astronauts on the Apollo mission had been allowed to take a cassette into space, and all but one had taken country music. Eno had grown up on country, which he had heard on American Armed Forces radio as a child, and he was struck by the juxtaposition. Country music, he told an interviewer in 1990, was “very much like ‘space music’… it has all the connotations of pioneering, of the American myth of the brave individual, and that myth has strong resonances throughout American culture.” In a way, then, Apollo is a sort of space-age frontier music. Tracks like “Silver Morning” and “Deep Blue Day” envisage a sort of weightless country & western, the soundtrack to an eternity drifting across the great plains of space, propelled by Lanois’ languid pedal steel.

This re-release commemorates 50 years since the Apollo 11 moon landings. While such anniversary events typically prompt a dredging through the archive for diverting outtakes, here Eno has taken a different approach. Alongside the original LP, remastered in full by Abbey Road’s Miles Showell, Eno reconvened the original trio for the first time since 1983, to create 11 brand-new tracks reimagining the soundtrack to For All Mankind. Unlike the original sessions, the trio worked remotely, with Lanois in the US and Roger Eno in Suffolk. 
The MIDI or WAV files they produced were then sent over to the elder Eno’s London studio, where he assembled the finished article. “What you hear now is a collaboration distant both in geographical terms, from one another, and temporal terms, from the original project,” explains Roger Eno.

Much of the spirit of the original remains intact though, but, with the division of labour split among more democratic lines, it’s perhaps easier to determine individual contributions. You can see Brian Eno’s fingerprints all over the eerie music-box progressions of “At The Foot Of The Ladder”, but a handful of Lanois compositions foreground chiming acoustic guitar and lap steel, radiating a sense of deep calm. And there is no doubting the quiet power of Roger Eno’s contributions; his “Waking Up” is striking in its restraint, little starbursts of treated piano bordering on moments of silence that feel like a quick gulp of oxygen.

Opening track “The End Of A Thin Chord” recalls Apollo’s “Deep Blue Day”, a sort of interstellar exotica spun from gentle, chiming melodies and a slight dusting of distortion, while Roger Eno’s chilling “Under The Moon” is bleaker in sound than anything on the original LP. Perhaps the most moving piece, though, is Brian Eno’s “Clear Desert Night”, with its lonely stargazing feel.

It’s an odd sort of idea: a trio paying tribute to themselves. But even if no new ground is being broken exactly, there’s a pleasure in hearing the old space cadets out on manoeuvres. The music of Apollo is meditative and benign, yet strangely inscrutable; a reminder that while you might be able to visit space, it will never be home.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Trash Kit – Horizon

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For a good decade now, London trio Trash Kit have been mining a very particular, streamlined sound – chipped, full of nervous, jangling energy, yet somehow symmetrical. Their first two records were packed with tightly interlocked songs, ticking and clock-wound, which sometimes came across, at first blush, as similar to The Raincoats, Y Pants or Pulsallama.

But comparisons to post-punk pioneers has always felt a little reductive, particularly when Rachel Aggs busts out one of her winding, circular guitar riffs, which sit closer to chimurenga or other types of South African popular music. You can hear this web of inspiration in Aggs’ other groups, too: in both the jittery, twisted songs of Shopping, and the refreshingly spare pop of Sacred Paws, Aggs’ distinctive playing and voice are at the core of the music’s character.

She’s one of the central figures in the London DIY underground that Trash Kit and Shopping are both part of, though it’s important to note that the politics of this loose collective of musicians seem to be more about the communal than the singular: about decentralisation, about claiming space for marginal and othered voices. Indeed, all of the members of Trash Kit, including their new bass player Gill Partington, are involved in other projects that align, somehow, with this scene – Partington and Horwood also play in Halo Halo; Horwood is a member of great bands like Bamboo and Bas Jan.

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It’s a refreshingly pluralistic scene, then, open to experimentation and play, and connected with other similar DIY gangs, such as Glasgow’s underground; indeed, the other member of Sacred Paws, Eilidh Rodgers, lives and works in Glasgow. And much like the other groups in their orbit, Trash Kit are fiercely independent, but never twee and “indie”, and they seem to have learned the best lessons from precursors like The Pastels and Huggy Bear about staying true to a strongly held set of ideals, while still being open and alive to the moment, to possibility.

Their debut self-titled effort was released in 2010, a year after the group formed, and it saw the group’s then-core membership of Rachel Horwood (drums, voice), Rachel Aggs (guitar, voice) and ex-Electrelane member Ros Murray (bass) spitting out pithy, shard-like bolts of lightning. A second album, 2014’s Confidence, found them starting to breathe out, the songs opening up, with Verity Sussmann joining 
in on saxophone for a few songs.

The latent possibilities hinted at on those LPs are writ large across the 11 songs on Horizon. It’s striking to hear just how confident the trio now are, and how interwoven their playing is; no mean feat when the songs are structured around long, sometimes meandering lines of thought, unspooling threads of melody and counter-melody, polyrhythms skittering across the stereo spectrum. Opener “Coasting” stretches out languorously, Horwood’s clattering drums subtly insistent and Aggs’ guitar weaving out a joyous, fleet-footed riff as Partington’s bass negotiates further intricacy, while the introduction of strings toward the end of the song gives its coda a sweeping gait. Aggs’ guitar in the following “Every Second” is tightly coiled, the better for sudden interjections of saxophone to curl around and nestle between the trio’s attenuated playing.

That opening riff is one of Aggs’ clearest gestures toward her love of South African pop. She’s talked previously about wanting to avoid “strumminess”, and the clean, glittery melodies of artists like Thomas Mapfumo have been core to Aggs’ thinking: “I had been getting into a lot of guitar music from Zimbabwe,” she says, “particularly early Thomas Mapfumo records, where you can clearly hear the progression from mbira rhythms to full-on radio pop… Also Soweto pop and funk really gets me excited.”

What a lot of this music shares is an incessant yet light-footed groove, and a lyricism that works right down to the level of the ensemble’s many interlocking parts; that deceptive simplicity is definitely part of Trash Kit’s remit.

And while, yes, you can still hear their love of post-punk, with some moments recalling The Raincoats circa Moving, or X-Ray Spex, Trash Kit’s palette is much broader still. Ask them what they’ve been listening to recently that might surprise and they’re refreshingly unorthodox: “We’ve always loved bands like Nissenenmondai and OOIOO, who are able to really stretch songs out in this psychedelic but still visceral way,” Aggs says. “And we love The Ex – they do a collaboration/cover version of a Konono No 1 song that we love so much.” You can hear this more expansive, “psychedelic” aesthetic on “Horizon” in particular, a song that strings its many different parts out across the skyline, a set of lights blinking in the night sky, all kinds of subtle details trickling into the song – a clacking woodblock here, one-note blurts of brass there – riding out a riff from Aggs that feels like it could go on forever, an ouroboros continually circling in on itself. It’s completely exhilarating.

There are other, equally thrilling moments too – the hypnotic, streamlined surrealism of “Sunset”, with its simple chants; the devastatingly lovely melody of the following “Get Out Of Bed”, shouted out loud and gorgeous by Aggs and Horwood, which winds down into peaceable, ticking guitar chimes, adrift in a sunlit wash of reverb; the wild ride that is the seven-minute instrumental “Disco”, pushing ever forward, enraptured by its own momentum, before falling apart at the six-minute mark for a convincingly spry stretch of clinking, scratchy free improvisation. (The influence of groups like Dog Faced Hermans, or the Netherlands’ improv-punks The Ex, feels particularly strong here.)

Tellingly, there’s also the choir that Horwood assembled to ground “Sunset” and “Traffic Lights” – the latter’s lyrics summarising one of the album’s, and the group’s, core messages about friendship, musical and otherwise: “We play in tune not touching/We play in time not listening/Your music inside my body/In my heart and my head.”
“I’ve been singing with Jenny Moore’s Mystic Business for a while now and also had the pleasure to sing for Fay Zmija Nicolson’s Spa Songs last year,” Horwood explains. “I don’t think I would have felt confident to try and gather a choir and add the extra vocals [on Horizon] if it wasn’t for those experiences.”

But there’s something in the very sound of the choir on these songs, singing out proud and true, that sums up so much about Trash Kit: a fearlessness; an understanding of the power of collectivised voices; the musicality and creativity of people in their everyday worlds, in real time, bodies and minds in motion.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

The Doors’ The Soft Parade reissued with stripped-down versions

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The Doors’ 1969 album The Soft Parade is 50 years old this week. To mark the anniversary, Rhino will release a 3xCD + 1xLP Deluxe Edition of the album on October 18, featuring nearly two hours of unreleased material.

This includes stripped down versions of five tracks (“Tell All The People,” “Touch Me,” “Wishful Sinful,” “Runnin’ Blue,” and “Who Scared You”) where the controversial horns and strings have been removed, as well as three stripped-back versions with new guitar parts added by Robby Krieger (“Touch Me,” “Wishful Sinful” and “Runnin’ Blue”).

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There are also three songs from studio rehearsals with Ray Manzarek (AKA Screamin’ Ray Daniels) on vocals. Hear an early version of “Roadhouse Blues” below:

The package also includes the full version of the much bootlegged, hour-long studio jam, “Rock Is Dead”. Check out the tracklisting below and pre-order here.

Disc One
“Tell All The People”
“Touch Me”
“Shaman’s Blues”
“Do It”
“Easy Ride”
“Wild Child”
“Runnin’ Blue”
“Wishful Sinful”
“The Soft Parade”
Bonus Track
“Who Scared You” – B-side

Disc Two
“Tell All The People” (Doors only mix)*
“Touch Me” (Doors only mix w/new Robby Krieger guitar overdub)*
“Runnin’ Blue” (Doors only mix w/new Robby Krieger guitar overdub)*
“Wishful Sinful” (Doors only mix w/new Robby Krieger guitar overdub)*
“Who Scared You” (Doors only mix)*
“Roadhouse Blues” – Screamin’ Ray Daniels (a.k.a. Ray Manzarek) on vocal*
“(You Need Meat) Don’t Go No Further” – Screamin’ Ray Daniels (a.k.a. Ray Manzarek) on vocal*
“I’m Your Doctor” – Screamin’ Ray Daniels (a.k.a. Ray Manzarek) on vocal*
“Touch Me” (Doors only mix)*
“Runnin’ Blue” (Doors only mix) *
“Wishful Sinful” (Doors only mix)*

Disc Three
“I Am Troubled”
“Seminary School” (aka “Petition The Lord With Prayer”) *
“Rock Is Dead” – Complete Version *
“Chaos” *

* previously unreleased

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Blur to release 1994 BBC session on 10″ vinyl

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To celebrate the 25th anniversary of Parklife, Blur are releasing a 1994 BBC Radio 1 session on 10″ vinyl (and digital formats) on August 2.

Recorded for Mark Radcliffe on March 7, 1994 – six weeks before the release of ParklifeLive At The BBC features four tracks: “Girls & Boys”, “Jubilee”, “Trouble In The Message Centre” and “Lot 105”.

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Blur are also reissuing a range of classic Parklife-era merchandise, including tote bags and T-shirt featuring their greyhound, beer mat and football logos. See the whole range over at Blur’s official site.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Echo & The Bunnymen announce The John Peel Sessions 1979-1983

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Echo & The Bunnymen have announced the release of The John Peel Sessions 1979-1983 via Rhino on September 6.

The double album features 21 tracks recorded for John Peel’s Radio 1 show during the early years of the band’s existence.

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Says The Bunnymen’s Will Sergeant: “Without John Peel sessions, Echo And The Bunnymen in my opinion, would not exist! It’s that simple. The band got so much support from him and John Walters (Peel’s producer). Recording a Peel session was essential to the development of our songwriting skills while at the same time giving us amazing exposure and self-belief.”

Check out the tracklisting for The John Peel Sessions 1979-1983 below and pre-order a limited edition red vinyl version of the album here.

LP1 Side One
Read It In Books (John Peel Session)
Stars Are Stars (John Peel Session)
I Bagsy Yours (John Peel Session)
Villiers Terrace (John Peel Session)
The Pictures On My Wall (John Peel Session)
All That Jazz (John Peel Session)

LP1 Side Two
Over The Wall (John Peel Session)
All My Colours (John Peel Session)
That Golden Smile (John Peel Session)
Heaven Up Here (John Peel Session)
Turquoise Days (John Peel Session)

LP2 Side One
Taking Advantage (John Peel Session)
An Equation (John Peel Session)
No Hands (John Peel Session)
Silver (John Peel Session)
Seven Seas (John Peel Session)

LP2 Side Two
The Killing Moon (John Peel Session)
Nocturnal Me (John Peel Session)
Watch Out Below (John Peel Session)
Ocean Rain (John Peel Session)
My Kingdom (John Peel Session)

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Watch a trailer for Roger Waters’ concert film, Us + Them

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Roger Waters has announced details of a new concert film, Us + Them, captured in Amsterdam on the European leg of his 2017/2018 world tour of the same name.

Us + Them was co-directed by Sean Evans who also worked on 2014’s Roger Waters: The Wall. Watch a trailer below:

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“I’m so looking forward to the launch of the movie in October,” writes Waters in a press release. “Us + Them is not standard rock and roll fare, some in the audience may ‘yee haaaa!!!’ Which is OK, but many will weep. That is what I hope for. Us + Them is a call to action. Homo Sapiens stand at a crossroads, we can either pool our love, develop our capacity to empathise with others and act collectively for the good of our planet, or we can remain Comfortably Numb, and continue, like blind lemmings, on our current omnicidal death march towards extinction. Us + Them is a vote for love and life.”

Sean Evans
added: “This is a great film – an amazing performance delivered with care, emotion and meaning. Didn’t think it was possible, but I believe we’ve outdone The Wall…”

Us + Them will be screened in cinemas around the world on Wednesday, October 2 and Sunday, October 6 (in Dolby Atmos where available). Visit the official site to find out details of participating cinemas and to buy tickets.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Iggy Pop announces new album, Free

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Iggy Pop has announced that his new album Free will be released by Loma Vista / Caroline International on September 6.

Free was created in collaboration with jazz trumpeter Leron Thomas and guitarist Noveller AKA Sarah Lipstate, and is described in a press release as “a uniquely sombre and contemplative entry in the Iggy Pop canon”.

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“This is an album in which other artists speak for me, but I lend my voice,” explains Iggy Pop. “By the end of the tours following Post Pop Depression, I felt sure that I had rid myself of the problem of chronic insecurity that had dogged my life and career for too long. But I also felt drained. And I felt like I wanted to put on shades, turn my back, and walk away. I wanted to be free. I know that’s an illusion, and that freedom is only something you feel, but I have lived my life thus far in the belief that that feeling is all that is worth pursuing; all that you need – not happiness or love necessarily, but the feeling of being free. So this album just kind of happened to me, and I let it happen.”

The album includes takes on poems by Lou Reed (“We Are The People”) and Dylan Thomas (“Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night”). Check out the full tracklisting below:

1. Free
2. Loves Missing
3. Sonali
4. James Bond
5. Dirty Sanchez
6. Glow In The Dark
7. Page
8. We Are The People
9. Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night
10. The Dawn

You can pre-order Free here.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Spiritualized to play Acoustic Mainline show in Hackney

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Spiritualized have announced that they will play a special ‘Acoustic Mainline’ show at London’s Hackney Empire on September 14.

It’s part of the travelling Somewhere festival, whose trademark is that all acts play in front of a backdrop of 1001 candles.

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Jason Pierce first toured as Spiritualized Acoustic Mainline in 2007, accompanied by piano, string quartet and a trio of gospel singers. Tickets for the Hackney Empire show go on sale at 10am on Friday (July 19) from here.

Other artists confirmed for the London leg of Somewhere include The Libertines’ Caral Barat and Peter Doherty, who play two acoustic shows at Hackney Empire on September 5 and 6.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Sleater-Kinney’s Carrie Brownstein responds to Janet Weiss’s departure

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Two weeks ago, we reported the shock news that drummer Janet Weiss had quit Sleater-Kinney on the eve of the release of their new album The Center Won’t Hold.

“We are saddened by Janet’s decision to leave Sleater-Kinney,” read the band’s official statement at the time. “It has been an incredible privilege to work with such a talented musician and drummer over the course of so many albums… We wish Janet all the best as she starts a new chapter in her life.”

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Now, in response to a fan question on Instagram, singer/guitarist Carrie Brownstein has provided a more personal perspective on Weiss’ departure:

“She left. We asked her to stay. We tried. It’s hard and sad… She’s left us with a job to do, a job we also expected and wanted her to be a part of. Her playing on this record is amazing and she’s raved about this album to us and to Annie. But we have to keep looking to the future. Things change, even when those changes are hard and unexpected. Four amazing women worked on this record and we are going to honor that work. So, what’s up? The usual….Women picking up the pieces when someone quits, because we have to and want to. We’re going to keep going because we believe in ourselves and it’s a privilege to get to play music for people. It’s a new chapter. And all artistic entities have many chapters, if they’re lucky. Either the music will resonate or it won’t.”

The Center Won’t Hold is released by Mom + Pop on August 16. You can read an in-depth review, plus an interview with the band, in the new issue of Uncut – in UK shops tomorrow (July 18) or available to order online by clicking here.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Watch a video for Joan Shelley’s new single, “Cycle”

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Joan Shelley has announced that her new album Like The River Loves The Sea will be released by No Quarter on August 30.

Watch a video for the track “Cycle” below:

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Like The River Loves The Sea, her fifth solo album, was recorded at Greenhaus Studios in Reykjavik, Iceland, with James Elkington co-producing, and Elkington and Nathan Salsburg serving as the backing band. A pair of Icelandic sisters, Þórdís Gerður Jónsdóttir and Sigrún Kristbjörg Jónsdóttir, added strings.

Like The River Loves The Sea is built as a haven for overstimulated heads in uncertain times,” says Shelley. “The title (which comes from a song by Si Kahn) speaks of the inevitable and at times indifferent nature of love. Whether it be a physical place or an idea, everyone needs a place of comfort. One where we can look out again from that place of calm and see how to best act and to be in an uncertain world.”

You can read an in-depth interview with Joan Shelley in the new issue of Uncut, in UK shops on Thursday or available to buy online now by clicking here.

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.

Wilco announce new album, Ode To Joy

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Wilco have announced that their new album Ode To Joy will be released on October 4 via dBpm Records.

Hear lead single “Love Is Everywhere (Beware)” below:

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“There MUST be more love than hate. Right?! I’m not always positive we can be so sure,” says Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy. “In any case, I’m starting to feel like being confident in that equation isn’t always the best motivation for me to be my best self – it can kind of let me off the hook a little bit when I think I should be striving to contribute more love outside of my comfortable sphere of family and friends. So… I guess the song is sort of a warning to myself that YES, Love IS EVERYWHERE, but also BEWARE! I can’t let that feeling absolve me of my duty to create more.”

You can pre-order Ode To Joy here, including limited edition coloured vinyl and a special deluxe LP book formats. Peruse the tracklisting below, and see Wilco’s autumn tourdates here.

1.Bright Leaves
2. Before Us
3. One and a Half Stars
4. Quiet Amplifier
5. Everyone Hides
6. White Wooden Cross
7. Citizens
8. We Were Lucky
9. Love Is Everywhere (Beware)
10. Hold Me Anyway
11. An Empty Corner

The September 2019 issue of Uncut is on sale from July 18, and available to order online now – with The Who on the cover. Inside, you’ll find Blue Note, Dr John, Quentin Tarantino, Joan Shelley, Ty Segall, Buzzcocks, Ride, Lucinda Williams, Lloyd Cole and more. Our 15-track CD also showcases the best of the month’s new music, including Modern Nature, Sleater-Kinney, Ezra Furman and more.