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This month in Uncut

This month in Uncut

Joni Mitchell, AC/DC, King Crimson and George Harrison all feature in the new issue of Uncut, dated December 2013, and out now.

In an exclusive to celebrate the singer-songwriter’s 70th birthday, Joni Mitchell discusses her remarkable career, from being “the only virgin in art school” to being “ex-communicated from the airwaves”.

Analysing her place within her generation of musicians, Mitchell wryly says: “I didn’t really have a peer group. I’m too good for a girl, right?”

The eventful, tragic tale of AC/DC’s Bon Scott is told, while Robert Fripp discusses the return of King Crimson, his appearance on All Star Mr & Mrs and working with David Bowie and Brian Eno.

We also look into the making of George Harrison’s eternal and controversial hit “My Sweet Lord”, with the help of the musicians who played on it, including Bobby Whitlock, Bobby Keys and Dave Mason.

Nils Lofgren being a “band guy” and working with Bruce Springsteen and Neil Young, while Bernard Butler reveals all about his new group, Trans, and his recent musical re-awakening. Meanwhile, Lloyd Cole answers your questions on subjects including golf, Bryan Ferry’s hair tips and his country influences, and songwriting legend Jimmy Webb shows us the songs that have soundtracked his life.

In our 40 pages of reviews this month, we check out the latest new or archive releases from The Beatles, Bob Dylan, The Rolling Stones, The Who, Captain Beefheart, White Denim and Midlake.

The free CD, entitled Blue Notes, features tracks from Okkervil River, Jonathan Wilson, Linda Thompson, Bill Callahan and Howe Gelb.

The new issue of Uncut, dated December 2013, is out today.

Visit our dedicated features section, with plenty of our best long pieces archived there. You can find it here.

Uncut is now available as a digital edition! Download here on your iPad/iPhone and here on your Kindle Fire or Nook.


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Editor's Letter

The 43rd Uncut Playlist Of 2014


Very taken with Africa Express' version of "In C", by Terry Riley, this week. I have a few takes on the piece (50 years old this month, incidentally), the latest being one by Portishead's Adrian Utley from a couple of years back, though I still probably default to what I think is the original...