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Trevor Bolder dies ages 62

Trevor Bolder dies ages 62

Trevor Bolder has died at the age of 62. He passed away from cancer yesterday (May 21), according to reports. He had been suffering from the disease for four years.

Bolder joined David Bowie's backing band in 1971, playing on four of Bowie's key early Seventies albums - Hunky Dory, The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust And The Spiders From Mars, Aladdin Sane and Pin Ups alongside guitarist Mick Ronson and drummer Woody Woodmansey.

Bowie has released a brief statement of his own, saying: “Trevor was a wonderful musician and a major inspiration for whichever band he was working with. But he was foremostly a tremendous guy, a great man.”

After his work with Bowie, Bolder joined Uriah Heep in 1976 and most recently appeared on their 2011 album, Into The Wild.

He underwent surgery for pancreatic cancer earlier this year, and had hoped to be well enough to join Uriah Heep for their performance at Download Festival next month.

A statement from Uriah Heep said: "It is with great sadness that Uriah Heep announce the passing of our friend the amazing Trevor Bolder, who has passed away after his long fight with cancer.

"Trevor was an all-time great, one of the outstanding musicians of his generation, and one of the finest and most influential bass players that Britain ever produced.

"His long time membership of Uriah Heep brought the band's music, and Trevor's virtuosity and enthusiasm, to hundreds of thousands of fans across the world."

Lead guitarist Mick Box said: "Trevor was a world-class bass player, singer and songwriter, and more importantly a world-class friend."

Bolder also performed with Wishbone Ash and Cybernauts.

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