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Richmond Fontaine Bring The Sound Of The Southwest To The UK

Richmond Fontaine Bring The Sound Of The Southwest To The UK

Uncut favourites, Richmond Fontaine are about to embark on a fourteen date tour of the UK and Ireland, starting this Saturday (February 10).

The group, fronted by songwriter Willy Vlautin, will preview material from their new LP “Thirteen Cities, which is due for release this April.

The album was recorded at Wavelab studios in Tucson, Arizona by JD Foster, who also produced their acclaimed albums, “Post To Wire” and “The Fitzgerald.”

Musicians from Howe Gelb to Calexico and Luca also contribute to the musical stories of redemption in the desert.

Speaking about the album’s contributors to www.uncut.co.uk, Willy Vlautin explained, “I didn't know Joey Burns or Jacob Valenzuela from Calexico, but JD introduced me to them and they're just great, really nice guys. In Tucson you meet so many cool guys. Howe Gelb came by and he was late for dinner with his wife, but he wanted to play piano on this song, so he was like “If we can do it in a half hour…” So those guys just kind of stopped by, if you were lucky and they were in town, or they had time, they'd play on the record, so for me it was a real, real lucky break.”

Richmond Fontaine will play the following venues this month:

Bedford, Esquires (February 10)
Winchester, Railway (11)
London, Dingwalls (13)
Bristol, St Bonaventures (14)
Leicester, The Musician (15)
Dublin, Whelans, Ireland (16)
Cork, Cyprus Avenue, Ireland (17)
Galway, Roison Dubh, Ireland (18)
Manchester, Academy 3 (20)
Leeds, The New Rocoe (21)
Glasgow, ABC2 (22)
Newcastle, Cluny (23)
Nottingham, Maze (24)
Norwich, Arts Centre (25)

Support on all dates comes from the Endrick Brothers and pedal steel player Paul Brainard.

Click here to see a video of new album track “Capsized”


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