It is "based on train wrecks from the late 19th and early 20th Centuries"

The Residents have announced details of a new studio album.

The Ghost Of Hope is released on vinyl and CD on March 24. The album is described as “a historically accurate album based on train wrecks from the late 19th and early 20th Centuries.”

“After discovering a series of vintage news articles highlighting the dangers of train travel in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and inspired by the era’s graceful language, the group contrast that eloquence against the sheer horror of these devastating events. In their own unique style, the band has constructed a highly original series of tone poems quite unlike the music of anyone else – except, of course, The Residents. The album features guest collaborator Eric Drew Feldman – who has worked with everybody cool, so he’s already in your record collection.

“If there’s a primary metaphor within this collection it is certainly found in that humble word ‘hope.’ When powerful men of the world build political campaigns around this simple four-letter word and fail, one wonders what life might become without it. Regardless, whether it be historical and literal, symbolic and metaphorical or simply nonsense, The Residents remain mum.”

The tracklisting for The Ghost Of Hope is:

Horrors Of The Night
The Crash At Crush
Death Harvest
Shroud Of Flames
The Great Circus Train Wreck of 1918
Train vs Elephant
Killed At A Crossing

The March 2017 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on The 101 Weirdest Albums Of All Time. Elsewhere in the issue, Ryan Adams tells us about his new album, Greg Lake (in one of his last interviews) remembers Emerson Lake & Palmer, and our free CD collects great new tracks from King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard, Duke Garwood, The Necks and more. The issue also features Grandaddy’s Jason Lytle on his best recorded work. Plus Michael Chapman, Buzzcocks, Rick Parfitt, Paul Weller & Robert Wyatt, John Waters, St Paul & The Broken Bones, Tinariwen, Dirty Projectors, Cream, Lift To Experience, New Order and more, plus 131 reviews

Uncut: the past, present and future of great music.