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Morrissey's World Peace Is None Of Your Business removed from iTunes and Spotify

 Morrissey's World Peace Is None Of Your Business removed from iTunes and Spotify

Morrissey's latest album, World Peace Is None Of Your Business, has been removed from US iTunes and Spotify.

The album has also been taken down from streaming site Rdio as well as the Stateside Amazon store as a digital purchase, reports Slicing Up Eyeballs, who add that it is currently not known if the move was at the behest of Morrissey or Harvest, the label on which the record was released. A UK representative for Morrissey refused to comment on the removal of the album in the US. At the time of writing, the album is still available to buy on UK iTunes and is streaming on UK Spotify.

Earlier this week (August 17), the singer claimed he had proof that he had been dropped by the label, after Harvest denied claims that their relationship had ended following the release of the album.

In a new statement posted on Morrissey fansite True To You on August 20, the singer detailed his disappointment with Harvest's marketing decisions, accusing them of not spending money to release proper music videos. Morrissey adds that Harvest "botched" the release of 'World Peace Is None Of Your Business'. Read the full statement here.

"I believed that the rich soil of the album had several strong hit singles," he wrote. "Frayed tempers began when Harvest arranged the ’spoken word’ films, none of which gave any clue as to what World peace is none of your business [sic] intended to be, or is. The films were OK, but they went nowhere and stayed there.? With every nerve alert, we pushed the label for a proper video for Istanbul to precede the album, not least of all because a single ahead of the album release might inch the album to a higher chart position."

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