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Morrissey writes 2,000 word essay on monarchy, animal cruelty and class

Morrissey writes 2,000 word essay on monarchy, animal cruelty and class

Morrissey has written a 2,000 treatise, which has appeared on his quasi-official fan site, True To You.

The post included his criticisms of cruelty to animals and the royal family. Titled The World Won't Listen, the post [dated November 18], is critical of "the depressive psychosis of modern Britain, which has become a most violent and melancholic country, with no space for measured debate."

"The days of Prime Ministers have gone, and it's time for a form of change that is far more meaningful than simply switching blue to red," he continued. "The print media will only support people who do not matter and who are incapable of instigating thought – David 'rent-a-smile' Beckham; his wife – famous for having nothing to do; the dum dum dummies of the Katie Price set; the overweight Jamie 'Orrible, who tells us all how to eat correctly."

The singer went on to conclude: "At what point did the did-United kingdom became a cabbagehead nation? Where is the rich intellect of debate? Where is our Maya Angelou, our James Baldwin, our Allen Ginsberg, our Anthony Burgess, our political and social reformers? At what point did the shatterbrained scatterbrains take over – with all leading British politicians suddenly looking like extras from Brideshead Revisited?

"Although it is clear to assess the Addams Family of SW1X as the utterly useless and embarrassing ambassadors of a sinking England, how can we effect change without being tear-gassed? In the absence of democracy, there is no way."

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