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Michael Jackson's doctor 'unable to administer CPR'

Michael Jackson's doctor 'unable to administer CPR'

Michael Jackson's doctor, Conrad Murray, allegedly told his bodyguards he didn't know how to administer CPR as the singer lay dying in June 2009, a Los Angeles court has heard.

Members of Jackson's staff have been testifying about the day he died at a preliminary hearing to decide whether Murray should be tried for involuntary manslaughter of the singer.

His former security chief Faheem Muhammed described how he saw Murray crouching alongside Jackson "in a panicked state asking, 'Does anyone know CPR?'" reports CNN.

He added: "We knew Dr Murray was a heart surgeon, so we were shocked."

Defence lawyer Ed Chernoff then asked Muhammed to clarify his statement, drawing the reply: "The way that he [Murray] asked it is as if he didn't know CPR."

Although Muhammed said he didn't see Murray performing CPR on Jackson, another member of the singer's security team, Alberto Alvarez, said he was present.

He explained: "After the second time, he gave a breath, he said, 'You know, this is the first time that I give mouth-to-mouth, but I have to do it, because he's my friend.'"

Alvarez went on to allege that Murray had also told him to collect various medicines from around Jackson's bedroom before paramedics had been called. "He then grabbed a handful of bottles or vials," Alvarez said. "He instructed me to put them in a bag."

The preliminary hearing is expected to run into next week. If the case does go to trial and Murray is found guilty, he could face up to four years in jail.

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