Album review

Laibach - The John Peel Sessions

The first significant rock act to emerge from the ailing communist states, Yugoslavia (or Slovenia's) Laibach were disconcerting to some, hilarious to others. Their militaristic posturing and musical fanfares, totalitarian iconography, gravel-scrunching backbeats and antlers drew accusations of fascism, but Laibach were explicitly anti-Nazi. In fact, their music, like "Hrava Gruda—Pldna Zemjla", is best taken as a poker-faced, complex satire on totalitarianism. They were also wryly aware of the latent fascistic tendencies of pop music. Sadly, their version of Queen's "One Vision" is not included, but their take on Opus' "Life Is Life", administered like a whip-master's chant to the galley slaves, is here in all its pseudo-pomp.

Rating: 3 / 10


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One of the many privileges and occasional disorientations of working for a monthly music mag is that we hear some music so far ahead of release that it can be easy to forget when the albums actually come out. So while the world of Ty Segall-related projects might have moved on...