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Bob Dylan approved for France's Légion d'Honneur

Bob Dylan approved for France's Légion d'Honneur

Bob Dylan has been nominated for France's Légion d'Honneur.

Dylan had his first nomination reportedly thrown out by the deciding council over his marijuana use and his opposition to the Vietnam War, reports Reuters.

The approval by the Légion d'Honneur council means France's minister of culture may soon decorate Dylan with the honour, which is the country's highest distinction. Previous performers awarded the honour include Paul McCartney and Charles Aznavour.

The 17-member council meet to discuss whether nominees conform with the government's institutional principles. On Sunday, via a letter sent to the Le Monde, the council's gran chancellor, Jean-Louis Georgelin, confirmed it had approved the nomination of Bob Dylan.

Georgelin called the singer/lyricist an "exceptional artist" known in his home country of the US and internationally, and said he was a "tremendous singer and a great poet". The grand chancellor also acknowledged the previous decision to throw out the nomination, citing what he called a "controversy" but he did no elaborate.

Last year (May 2012), Bob Dylan was honoured with the Medal Of Freedom by US president Barack Obama at the White House. Dylan, among 13 new recipients of the US' highest civilian award, was paid a glowing tribute by Obama, who said there was "no bigger giant in the history of American music".

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