He has teamed up with Paul Shaffer

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Historically, I’ve always found myself drawn to Bill Murray‘s extra-curricular activities.

After all, it’s hard not to enjoy tales of the actor performing karaoke with strangers, crashing stag dos or bartending at SXSW.

There is an especially heart-warming website called Bill Murray Stories, where members of the general public are invited to submit photographs and anecdotes of themselves featuring Bill Murray. Each one details unusual and random encounters with Murray at baseball games, on the golf course, or the Duty Free at JFK airport.

The stories carry headlines like, ‘Autograph At My Wedding’, ‘One Unbelievable Elevator Ride, Part 2’ and ‘Bill Murray Ate Church’s Chicken At My Choir Rehearsal’.

In the perfect Uncut meeting of the minds, it is even possible to watch Bill Murray sing Bob Dylan.

For his latest venture, Murray has teamed up with Paul Shaffer – an old comrade from the Saturday Night Live days who subsequently became musical director and sidekick for David Letterman‘s shows.

Shaffer has a new album out – Paul Shaffer & The World’s Most Dangerous Band – which features guest vocalist ranging from Dion to Jenny Lewis. Murray appears on a song called “Happy Street“: you can watch the video below. Meanwhile, Paul Shaffer & The World’s Most Dangerous Band is released on March 17 on Sire Records.

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The May 2017 issue of Uncut is now on sale in the UK – featuring our cover story on Buckingham Nicks. Elsewhere in the issue, there’s interviews with Elastica, Mac DeMarco, John Lydon and Mike Love. We take a trip to Morocco – North African destination of The Beatles, Stones, Hendrix and more – and look back at the life of Laura Nyro. Our free CD collects great new tracks from Father John Misty, Mark Lanegan Band, Fairport Convention, Thundercat and more. The issue also features Wire on their best recorded work. Plus Future Islands, Lemon Twigs, Sleaford Mods, Rod Stewart, Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, T.Rex, Cosey Fanni Tutti and more, plus 131 reviews

Uncut: the past, present and future of great music.