Festivals

William Tyler at End Of The Road 2013 – review

William Tyler at End Of The Road 2013 – review

Belle And Sebastian at End Of The Road 2013 - review
Ethan Johns at End Of The Road 2013 - review
David Byrne & St Vincent at End Of The Road 2013 - review
Eels at End Of The Road 2013 – review
Parquet Courts at End Of The Road 2013 – review
Mike Heron & Trembling Bells at End Of The Road 2013 – review

One of the highlights of this weekend's Uncut Tipi Tent is almost certainly William Tyler's performance on Sunday afternoon. It's hot and dry in Dorset, and Tyler's dusty, crystalline solo guitar pieces are the perfect counterparts.

The former Lambchop and Silver Jews musician plays to a surprisingly packed, and rapt, tent, mostly performing tracks from his second album, this year's Impossible Truth.

Live, the likes of "Cadillac Desert" - which Tyler dedicates to Marfa, Texas, a remote town of artists and musicians that gave him "the most psychedelic experience ever...without help" - are more luminously alive than on record, and with their chorus and echo effects, even more reminiscent of The Durutti Column's Vini Reilly.

Tyler closes his 40-minute set with the reverby "Country Of Illusion" - he explains it was inspired by the end of the world, but admits that he'd like to put a more positive 'new beginning' slant on it in honour of End Of The Road's positive vibes.

Tom Pinnock

Follow Tom on Twitter for more End Of The Road coverage: www.twitter.com/thomaspinnock

Visit our new, dedicated features section, with plenty of our best long pieces archived there. You can find it here.

Uncut is now available as a digital edition! Download here on your iPad/iPhone and here on your Kindle Fire or Nook.


Newsletter


Editor's Letter

The return of The Aphex Twin, and Caustic Window


Last year, Warp Records embarked on a campaign for Boards Of Canada's "Tomorrow's Harvest" comeback that was notable for its obtuseness. Unmarked 12-inches were hidden in record stores, strings of numbers and inexplicable broadcasts were strewn enigmatically across the internet. At one point, I...