Fans of BBC’s Sherlock will know that the legendary detective has what he calls a Memory Palace, in which he is given to roam around, looking usually for clues to mysteries galore. My own equivalent is a sort of Memory Shed, where I am inclined to potter, most recently after reading Peter Watts’ excellent cover story on The Ramones in the current Uncut.


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Anyone who’s read any of Robert Gordon’s previous books, like Can’t Be Satisfied, for instance, his great biography of Muddy Waters, will no doubt be looking forward to Respect Yourself: Stax Records And The Soul Explosion, Gordon’s history of the legendary Memphis label, which is published this month by Bloomsbury.


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The new issue of Uncut has just gone on sale. The Kinks are on the cover and inside we have exclusive interviews with Ray and Dave Davies, who tell us what it will take for them to get back together to celebrate the band’s 50th anniversary in 2014, so we’ve titled this month’s free CD after one of their early hits.


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This is the last newsletter of 2013, and therefore an appropriate moment perhaps to thank you for your support over the last 12 months and wish you all the best for the New Year. The next time you hear from me, our first issue of 2014 will already be out – we’ll be on sale from Friday, January 3 – so here’s a brief taster of what to expect.


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The current issue of Uncut comes with a rather spiffing free 52-page magazine that hosts our essential guide to the best new albums, reissues, box sets, films, DVDs and books of 2013. This year we’ve expanded our new album section to a Top 80, as voted for by the Uncut staff and nigh on 50 of our regular contributors.


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First of all this week, let me quickly plug our most recent Ultimate Music Guide, which is dedicated to Depeche Mode. As with previous specials in the Ultimate Music Guide series on David Bowie, the Stones, Bruce Springsteen, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, The Beatles, John Lennon, Paul Weller, The Clash, Nick Cave, The Kinks, U2, REM and The Smiths – all of which you can order online at uncut.co.uk/store or order digitally at uncut.co.uk/download – Depeche Mode – The Ultimate Music Guide features brand new reviews of all Depeche’s albums, written by a stellar team of Uncut scribes, plus a ton of vintage interviews from the archives of Melody Maker and NME, reprinted for the first time in years and covering the whole of the band’s career from their first stirrings in deepest Basildon in the early 80s.

Depeche Mode – The Ultimate Music Guide is on sale now.


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You find us at that time in the month when things start getting more than a wee bit hectic, deadlines fast approaching as we head into the final week or so of work on the new issue, for which I am reviewing Roy Harper’s Man & Myth, his first album of new material since The Green Man, 13 years ago. There’s also the small matter of next month’s cover story, which I’m also writing, which means it’s all go at the moment.


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One of the projects we have just finished working on for the next issue of Uncut, on sale next week, was a special promotional feature we have produced in association with hmv, which is newly returned to robust high street health after recent rough times.


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God bless Rod Stewart

Not even creepy celebrity horse-whisperer Alan Yentob could wholly ruin last week’s highly entertaining BBC Arena special on Rod Stewart. His contributions were laughably witless all the same. “You look just like brothers!” he exclaimed excitedly of Rod and long-time mucker Ronnie Woods, which may have been true 40 years ago. These days they don’t even look like cousins.


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When The Rolling Stones appeared here in 1969, they played on a stage so ultimately flimsy it afterwards could have been towed away on the back of a truck or broken down on the spot and sold for scrap. Unlike the Stones, it was not built to last.


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Newsletter


Editor's Letter

Reviewed: Kate Bush, Hammersmith Apollo, August 27, 2014


There is a song on "Aerial", Kate Bush's eighth and possibly best album, called "Bertie". "Here comes the sunshine," it begins, "Here comes that son of mine/Here comes the everything/Here's a song and a song for him." Nine years later, here, perhaps is a show for him: an unexpected comeback; a...